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Curriculum Standards for Social Studies
National Council for the Social Studies

Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site:
Birthplace of the Modern Presidency

relates to the following Social Studies Standards:

    Theme II: Time, Continuity and Change

  • Standard C - The student identifies and describes selected historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, such as the rise of civilizations, the development of transportation systems, the growth and breakdown of colonial systems, and others.
  • Standard D - The student identifies and uses processes important to reconstructing and reinterpreting the past, such as using a variety of sources, providing, validating, and weighing evidence for claims, checking credibility of sources, and searching for causality.
  • Standard F - The student uses knowledge of facts and concepts drawn from history, along with methods of historical inquiry, to inform decision-making about and action-taking on public issues.

    Theme VI: Power, Authority, and Governance

  • Standard B - The student describes the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used, and justified.
  • Standard C - The student analyzes and explains ideas and governmental mechanisms to meet needs and wants of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security.
  • Standard F - The student explains conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict and cooperation within and among nations.
  • Standard G - The student describes and analyzes the role of technology in communications, transportation, information-processing, weapons development, or other areas as it contributes to or helps resolve conflicts.
  • Standard H - The student explains and applies concepts such as power, role, status, justice, and influence to the examination of persistent issues and social problems.

    Theme VII: Production, Distribution, and Consumption

  • StandardI - The student uses economic concepts to help explain historical and current developments and issues in local, national, or global contexts.
  • Standard J - The student uses economic reasoning to compare different proposals for dealing with a contemporary social issue such as unemployment, acid rain, or high quality education.

    Theme VIII: Science, Technology, and Society

  • Standard A - The student examines and describes the influence of culture on scientific and technological choices and advancement, such as in transportation, medicine, and warfare.

    Theme X: Civic Ideals, and Practices

  • Standard A - The student examines the origins and continuing influence of key ideals of the democratic republican form of government, such as individual human dignity, liberty, justice, equality, and the rule of law.
  • Standard B - The student identifies and interprets sources and examples of the rights and responsibilities of citizens.
  • Standard D - The student practices forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideals of citizens in a democratic republic.
  • Standard E - The student explains and analyzes various forms of citizen action that influence public policy decisions.
  • Standard F - The student identifies and explains the roles of formal and informal political actors in influencing and shaping public policy and decision-making
  • Standard J - The student examines strategies designed to strengthen the "common good," which consider a range of options for citizen action.

 

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