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Curriculum Standards for Social Studies
National Council for the Social Studies

Federal Courthouses and Post Offices: Symbols of Pride and Permanence in American Communities
relates to the following Social Studies Standards:

    Theme I: Culture

  • Standard C – The student explains and gives examples of how language, literature, the arts, architecture, other artifacts, traditions, beliefs, values, and behaviors contribute to the development and transmission of culture.

    Theme II: Time, Continuity and Change

  • Standard B - The student identifies and uses key concepts such as chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity.

    Theme III: People, Places and Environments

  • Standard A - The student elaborates mental maps of locales, regions, and the world that demonstrate understanding of relative location, direction, size, and shape.
  • Standard B – The student creates, interprets, uses, and distinguishes various representations of the earth, such as maps, globes, and photographs.
  • Standard G – The student describes how people create places that reflect cultural values and ideals as they build neighborhoods, parks, shopping centers, and the like.
  • Standard H – The student examines, interprets, and analyzes physical and cultural patterns and their interactions, such as land uses, settlement patterns, cultural transmission of customs and ideas, and ecosystem changes.

    Theme IV: Individual Development and Identity

  • Standard B - The student describes personal connections to places associated with community, nation, and world.
  • Standard H - The student works independently and cooperatively to accomplish goals.

    Theme V: Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

  • Standard B - The student analyzes group and institutional influences on people, events, and elements of culture.
  • Standard C – The student describes the various forms institutions take and the interactions of people with institutions.
  • Standard G - The student applies knowledge of how groups and institutions work to meet individual needs and promote the common good.

    Theme VI: Power, Authority and Governance

  • Standard B - The student describes the purpose of the government and how its powers are acquired.
  • Standard C - The student analyzes and explains ideas and governmental mechanisms to meet wants and needs of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security.
  • Standard E – The student identifies and describes the basic features of the political system of the United States, and identifies representative leaders.
  • Standard I - The student gives examples and explains how governments attempt to achieve their stated ideals at home and abroad.

    Theme VII: Production, Distribution and Consumption

  • Standard D – The student describes a range of examples of the various institutions that make up economic systems such as households, business firms, banks, government agencies, labor unions, and corporations.

    Theme X: Civic Ideals and Practices

  • Standard A - The student examines the origins and continuing influence of key ideals of the democratic republican form of government, such as individual human dignity, liberty, justice, equality, and the rule of law.

 

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