Long Island Head Light

[photo]
Long Island Head Light
Photo by Jeremy D'Entremont, www.lighthouse.cc
Long Island, Boston Harbor's longest island, has been the home to a resort hotel, military fortifications, a state prison hospital and four light houses. First established in 1819, the light station consisted of a 28-foot tall, stone tower. It was replaced by a cast-iron tower in 1844, which was itself replaced in 1881. The present cylindrical tower was constructed in 1901 on the highest point of land at the northeast end of Long Island. The World War I remains of Fort Strong lie a short distance from the tower, revealing its strategic location. Access to the 52-foot tall tower is through an enclosed brick workroom topped by a gable roof. The attached workroom and the tower are the only station buildings that exist today.

[photo]
Long Island Head Light
Photo by Jeremy D'Entremont, www.lighthouse.cc

Long Island Head Light was automated in 1929 and deactivated in 1982. Relit in 1985 using a solar-powered optic, Long Island Light remains an active aid to navigation. The U.S. Coast Guard repaired the tower's interior in 1994. In 1998, the exterior was repainted and some of the original brick, mortar and iron work replaced.

Long Island Head Light is located on the northeastern end of Long Island at the entrance to Boston's Inner Harbor. It is owned and maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard as an active aid to navigation. Long Island is one of 34 islands comprising Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, which is managed by a 13-member partnership that includes the National Park Service and other public and private organizations. A bridge connects the City of Quincy, Massachusetts, with Long Island, but use of the bridge is highly restricted. Both the island and the light station are closed to the public and are best seen by boat. Further information can be found on the websites of the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area and Boston Harbor Islands Partnership.

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