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[Graphic] Bell Court Historic Neighborhood District
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[Photo] Homes in the Bell Court Historic District reflect the Victorian and Queen Anne styles that were popular around the turn of the 20th century.
Photograph by Eric Thomason, courtesy of the Blue Grass Trust for Historic Preservation

The Bell Court Historic Neighborhood District was developed around the turn of the 20th century as a middle-class neighborhood near the heart of downtown. The location of the district was pivotal because it allowed residents to walk to their jobs downtown prior to the advent of the automobile. There are 157 buildings in the district, nearly all of which are residential in nature. The core of the district is the historic building known as Bell Place. This impressive home was designed by famed Lexington architect Thomas Lewinski, who combined elements of the Greek Revival and Romanesque styles into the design of the home. Bell Place was donated to the city of Lexington in 1940 and the property continues to be used as a public park to this day. The Clay Villa is also located in the Bell Court Neighborhood and is the oldest home in the district. The villa was constructed for James B. Clay, son of statesman Henry Clay, in 1846.
 
[Photo] The Pulliam House, 505 East Main Street
Photo from National Register collection

Most of the homes in the district reflect the Victorian and Queen Anne styles that were popular around the turn of the 20th century. There are also many Arts and Crafts style houses that dot the development. Visitors to the district can park their cars and travel the way residents of the district did shortly after its construction, by foot, and appreciate the architecture and landscape. The Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd lies in the district at the southwest corner of East Main and Bell Court. Completed in 1925-26, it is a sterling example of late Gothic Revival style.

Bell Court Historic Neighborhood District includes several main streets: Bell Court, Forest Ave., Sayre Ave., Russell Ave., Delmar Ave., and Boonesboro Ave. The private homes within the district are not open to the public.

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