National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior

National Register of Historic Places Program:
Landscape Architecture Month - Showcase
Platt National Park Historic District

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.

 

National Register coordinators were invited to submit images of designed landscaes listed in the National Register that they think are among the best in their state.

Platt National Park Historic District

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Photograph courtesy of Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office

Platt National Park Historic District

Sulpher, Oklahoma

Reference Number:11000628 (National Historic Landmark)

The 848-acre landscape that comprised the boundaries of Platt National Park in 1940 is nationally significant for its tangible representation of the federal policies in conservation, outdoor recreation, and national resource planning central to the Federal Government’s response to the Great Depression under President Franklin D. Roosevelt and became known as the New Deal.  The Platt National Park Historic District meets National Historic Landmark Criterion 1 for its highly illustrative association with the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), one of the most widespread and popular economic relief programs of the New Deal.  At Platt National Park from 1933 to 1940 enrollees from CCC Camp 808 engaged in one of the most carefully orchestrated programs of conservation work in the national park system.  The Platt National Park Historic District also meets National Historic Landmark Criterion 4 for its outstanding representation of the design principles and practices of landscape design that were formulated by NPS designers in the early twentieth century and, in the 1930s, became the hallmark of CCC work in national, state, and local parks.