Angel Island
NHL Photograph
The National Register of Historic Places recognizes the historical contribution of Asian and Pacific peoples in the United States. Throughout the 19th century, Asian people immigrated to the United States, helping build the industrial infrastructure that fueled America's Industrial Revolution. May 10th, 1999 marks the 130th Anniversary of the original Golden Spike ceremony. A unit of the National Park Service, Golden Spike National Historic Site is the place where the nation's first Transcontinental Railroad was completed in 1869. From the early 1800s to the late 20th century, Asian and Pacific peoples have played a vital role in the development of the United States, struggling for full citizenship, fighting prejudice, and making lasting contributions in all elements of American society. The month of May is National Asian-Pacific Heritage Month, and as part of the recognition, this site showcases historic properties listed in the National Register and National Park units highlighting the rich heritage of Asian and Pacific peoples in America. Join the National Register in commemorating just a few of the places where Asian and Pacific people have made history.



Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park

Asian American Heritage

  • Golden Spike National Historic Site
  • Manzanar National Historic Site
  • Pacific Islander Heritage

  • Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
  • Kalaupapa National Historical Park
  • Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park
  • Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park
  • Puukohola Heiau National Historic Site
  • War in the Pacific National Historical Park


  • Japanese laborers in the fields of the Delta, 1905-1920.
    Courtesy of the Ira Brown Cross Collection, Bancroft Library, University of California Berkeley

  • Angel Island

  • A National Historic Landmark that served as the West Coast's "Ellis Island" to hundreds of thousands of Chinese and Japanese immigrants.


  • Locke and Walnut Grove Chinese and Japanese Historic Districts

  • Three neighboring Asian-American communities established in the Delta Region of California by immigrant agricultural workers.

  • Seattle's International District (Chinatown)
    A Seattle historic district that combines Asian and Western architectural traditions into a uniquely American neighborhood.


    "CRM" is the flagship publication of the NPS Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnership Programs and contains articles on the full range of cultural resources management and preservation topics. The following issues deal directly with questions regarding Asian and Pacific Islands cultural resources.

    Approaches to Heritage: Hawaiian and Pacific Perspectives on Preservation
    A CRM issue that explores aspects of Hawaiin and Pacific Perspectives. (PDF format)
    Search the Issue Archives then, search Issue Title for "Approaches to Heritage: Hawaiian and Pacific Perspectives on Preservation".

    Preservation in the Pacific Basin
    A CRM issue that explores aspects of Preservation in the Pacific Basin. (PDF format)
    Search the Issue Archives then, search Issue Title for "Preservation in the Pacific Basin".

    Another View from Hawai'i
    A CRM issue that explores aspects of Another View from Hawai'i. (PDF format)
    Search the Issue Archives then, search Issue Title for "Another View from Hawai'i".

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