FR Doc E9-31223[Federal Register: January 5, 2010 (Volume 75, Number 2)]
[Notices]               
[Page 433-434]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr05ja10-103]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service
 
Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Seton Hall 
University Museum, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.
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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Seton Hall 
University Museum, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, that meets 
the definitions of "sacred object" and "object of cultural 
patrimony" under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    Consultation was conducted with representatives of the Onondaga 
Nation of New York and the Tuscarora Nation of New York. Requests for 
consultation were sent to the Cayuga Nation of New York; Oneida Nation 
of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Seneca Nation of New 
York; Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians 
of New York; the Mohawk Nation (which is comprised of the Mohawks of 
the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York; Mohawk Council of Akwesasne; 
and Mohawk Nation Council of Chiefs); and the Haudenosaunee Standing 
Committee on Burial Rules and Regulations, a non-Federally recognized 
Indian group.
    The artifact is a miniature false face mask or medicine face. The 
miniature was obtained at a "reservation near Syracuse," by Mr. 
Samuel Tarrant of Newark, NJ. Museum officials reasonably believe that 
the reservation is the Onondaga Reservation, which is near Syracuse, 
NY. It is not known when or how Mr. Tarrant obtained it. The Seton Hall 
University Museum purchased it from Mr. Tarrant in 1962 or 1963.
    Written evidence of Haudenosaunee oral tradition identifies false 
face masks as being sacred objects needed by traditional Haudenosaunee 
religious leaders, as well as being objects of cultural patrimony that 
have ongoing historical, traditional, and cultural significance to the 
group and could not have been alienated by a single individual. The 
Haudenosaunee Confederacy includes the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, 
Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora Nations (which are represented by the 
following Federally-recognized groups: Cayuga Nation of New York; 
Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; 
Onondaga Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga 
Tribe of Oklahoma; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York; Tonawanda Band 
of Seneca Indians of New York; and Tuscarora Nation of New York). Based 
on the provenience, this false face mask is considered to be culturally 
affiliated to the Onondaga Nation of New York.
    Officials of the Seton Hall University Museum have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(C), the cultural object described above 
is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American 
religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American 
religions by their present-day adherents. Officials of the Seton Hall 
University Museum have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 
(3)(D), the cultural item described above has ongoing historical, 
traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American 
group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. 
Lastly, officials of the Seton Hall University Museum have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared 
group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object/
object of cultural patrimony and the Onondaga Nation of New York.
    Representatives of any other Indian nation or tribe that believes 
itself to be culturally affiliated with this sacred object/object of 
cultural patrimony should contact Dr. Thomas W. Kavanagh, Seton Hall 
University Museum, Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Ave., South 
Orange, NJ 07079, telephone (973) 275-5873, or Thomas.Kavanagh@shu.edu, 
before February 4, 2010. Repatriation of the sacred object/object of 
cultural patrimony to the Onondaga Nation of New York may proceed after 
that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Seton Hall University Museum is responsible for notifying the 
Haudenosaunee Standing Committee on Burial Rules and Regulations, and 
the Cayuga Nation of New York; Oneida

[[Page 434]]

Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Onondaga 
Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York; Tonawanda Band of Seneca 
Indians of New York; and Tuscarora Nation of New York, that this notice 
has been published.

    Dated: November 25, 2009.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E9-31223 Filed 1-4-10; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4312-50-S

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