[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 211 (Thursday, October 31, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65357-65359]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov ]
[FR Doc No: 2013-25989]



[[Page 65357]]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-14043; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human 
remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian 
tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian 
tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice 
that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and 
associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the 
University of Michigan. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to the University of Michigan at the address in this notice 
by December 2, 2013.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of 
Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming 
Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone (734) 
647-9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from Jackson, Lenawee, Livingston, Oakland, 
Sanilac, and Shiawassee Counties, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay 
Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky 
Boy's Reservation, Montana; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa 
Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay 
Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, 
Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-
e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; 
Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed 
as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, 
Michigan and Indiana; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; and 
the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan.
    Additional requests for consultation were sent to the Bad River 
Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River 
Reservation, Wisconsin; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota 
Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Fond du 
Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County 
Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota 
Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Leech 
Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Mille Lacs Band 
of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band 
of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian 
Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, 
Minnesota; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa 
Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North 
Dakota; White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
and the Wyandotte Nation.
    Hereafter, all tribes listed in this section are referred to as 
``The Tribes.''

History and Description of the Remains

    On an unknown date prior to 1965, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual were removed from the O'Brien Road site (20JA247) 
in Jackson County, MI. Workers unearthed human remains during gravel 
pit operations near Spring Arbor Township. Amateur archeologists 
excavated the remains of one adult male from the site and donated them 
to the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology (UMMA) in 1964. No 
date or time period for the human remains could be established. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1930, human remains representing, at minimum, 12 individuals 
were removed from the Hayworth site (20JA250) in Jackson County, MI. A 
landowner unearthed the burials while conducting road-grading 
activities on his property and collected the remains of ten adults, one 
infant, and one cremated individual. The ten adults and one infant were 
found buried in flexed positions, with groupings of individuals noted. 
The landowner donated the human remains to the UMMA on October 31, 
1930. The human remains date to the Pre-Contact Period based on 
mortuary treatment. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date prior to 1977, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Garrison site (20LE99) in 
Lenawee County, MI. A landowner found the remains of one adult female 
while working on her property. The landowner collected the human 
remains and gave them to a local archeologist in 1976, who subsequently 
donated the remains to the UMMA within the same year. No date or time 
period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, 8 individuals were 
removed from the Harsh Family site (20LE1) in Lenawee County, MI. A 
landowner discovered the burials while conducting dirt removal 
activities on his property. Dan Morse of the UMMA assisted the 
landowner with the excavation of two burial pits containing the remains 
of seven adults and one

[[Page 65358]]

child. The landowner donated the collections to the UMMA on October 4, 
1958. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1974, human remains representing, at minimum, 12 individuals 
were removed from the GL-0174 site (20LE38) in Lenawee County, MI. 
Representatives of the UMMA found and excavated a small borrow pit that 
contained commingled burials in Macon Township and collected the 
remains of eight cremated adults, three cremated children, and one non-
cremated adult, along with two associated funerary objects. Red ochre 
was noted as covering the cremations. The human remains date to the 
Late Archaic Period based on mortuary treatment. No known individuals 
were identified. The 2 associated funerary objects present are 1 stone 
``cloud blower'' pipe fragment and 1 animal bone.
    In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Bernard Pepper site (20LE37) in Lenawee County, MI. A 
landowner discovered the burial on his property during construction 
activities and contacted the Michigan State Police. The police 
collected the remains of one older female and one associated funerary 
and sent them to the UMMA for identification. Donald F. Huelke, 
Professor of Anatomy, concluded the individual was Native American. The 
landowner subsequently donated the collections to the UMMA. The human 
remains date to sometime between the Late Archaic and Middle Woodland 
Periods based on the funerary object. No known individuals were 
identified. The 1 associated funerary object present is a Busycon 
contrarium conch shell.
    In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Hamburg site (20LV1) in Livingston County, MI. The son 
of a landowner living near Whitewood Lake found the human remains 
submerged in the water near the shoreline. They were brought to the 
UMMA and identified as those of an adult female. The landowner donated 
the collections to the UMMA in July of 1960. No date or time period for 
the human remains could be established. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary are present.
    In 1997, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Whitmore Lake site in Livingston County, MI. A 
construction crew engaged in gravel operations near Whitmore Lake 
discovered the burial and contacted the Whitmore Lake Police 
Department. The police collected an isolated, fragmented cranium of an 
adult male and sent the remains to the Washtenaw County Medical 
Examiner's Office. The Medical Examiner concluded they were Native 
American and donated them to the UMMA. No date or time period for the 
human remains could be established. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were 
removed from the Tessmer site (20OK5) in Oakland County, MI. The 
burials were discovered on private land east of Pontiac, MI, during 
commercial gravel operations that destroyed two-thirds of a Pre-Contact 
Period cemetery. Emerson Greenman of the UMMA excavated the cemetery 
with the assistance of R. Hatt and A. Spaulding and collected the 
remains of one adult male, one young adult female, and one associated 
funerary object. One cranium showed evidence of an ancient plaque 
removal. Museum records indicate that the UMMA's total holdings from 
this site entered the museum between the years 1951-1959 as portions of 
4 separate accessions. The completion of an artificial lake completely 
destroyed the site in 1959. The human remains date to the Middle Late 
Woodland Period (900-1200 A.D.) based on mortuary treatment. No known 
individuals were identified. The 1 associated funerary object present 
is a ceramic sherd.
    In 1934, human remains representing, at minimum, 14 individuals 
were removed from the Farmington 1 site (20OK2) in Oakland County, MI. 
Workers for a commercial gravel pit operation discovered the burials 
and contacted the Oakland County Sherriff's Department. The Sheriff's 
Deputies contacted James Griffin of the UMMA to investigate the site. 
Griffin identified and excavated a large ossuary pit, collecting the 
remains of 10 adults, one sub-adult (under 12 years old), two children, 
and one neonate, along with 161 associated funerary objects. Ancient 
modifications were noted on one set of long bones with the ends cut, 
shaved, and drilled. Additionally, one cranium of an older male, with 
two ancient drillings, was found encased in blue clay and with blue 
clay packed into the nose and mouth cavities. Based on historical 
documentation, archeologists have associated these types of post-mortem 
holes/drillings with the ``feast of the dead'' where skeletons were 
ceremonially re-articulated using such holes. The human remains date to 
the Middle Late Woodland Period (900-1200 A.D.) based on diagnostic 
artifacts and mortuary treatment. No known individuals were identified. 
The 161 associated funerary objects present are all ceramic sherds.
    In November 1934, human remains representing, at minimum, 8 
individuals were removed from the Yerkes site (20OK3) in Oakland 
County, MI. A landowner collected the remains of seven adults and one 
sub-adult, along with 40 associated funerary objects, on his property 
near 10 Mile Road and donated these collections to the UMMA. The human 
remains date to sometime during the Middle Late Woodland Period to the 
Late Late Woodland Period (900-1400 A.D.) based on diagnostic 
artifacts. The 40 associated funerary objects present are 1 animal 
mandible fragment, 2 animal teeth, 1 unworked snail shell, 35 ceramic 
sherds, and 1 worked flint.
    In 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, 21 individuals 
were removed from the Troy Township Gravel Pit site (20OK4) in Oakland 
County, MI. Workers discovered the burials during gravel pit 
operations. They contacted Wilbert Hinsdale of the UMMA who excavated 
the remains of 14 adults, four adolescents, and three children, along 
with eight associated funerary objects. Within a month after Hinsdale 
had excavated the burials, a local woman contacted him to report that 
she had found a bone needle in the vicinity of the site and wanted to 
donate it to the museum. Hinsdale returned to the site to collect the 
donation and search the burial site again. He found and collected one 
small clay cup. The human remains date to the Middle Late Woodland 
Period (900-1200 A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts. No known 
individuals were identified. The 10 associated funerary objects present 
are 5 ceramic sherds, 3 faunal bones, 1 animal bone needle, and 1 small 
clay cup with traces of yellow ochre.
    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Union Lake site (20OK8) in Oakland County, MI. A 
contractor found and removed the remains of one adult male, located in 
a peat deposit, while constructing an artificial lake. He later donated 
the human remains to the UMMA on May 18, 1960. The human remains date 
to the Middle Archaic Period (7000  400 years B.P.) based on pollen 
analysis from residues inside the cranium. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, 5 individuals were 
removed from the Hamilton site (20OK338) in Oakland County, MI. A 
landowner collected the remains of four females and one male from a 
gravel pit

[[Page 65359]]

and donated them to the UMMA on June 13, 1940. Ancient modifications 
were noted on the remains, with one cranium having been drilled and 
evidence of cradle boarding noted on several of the crania. The human 
remains date to the Early-to-Late Woodland Period (500-1400 A.D.) based 
on mortuary treatment. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In September 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Tynride site (20OK55) in Oakland 
County, MI. Construction workers discovered the burial and contacted 
the Oakland County Medical Examiner. The Medical Examiner collected 
remains from one young adult female, along with one associated funerary 
object, and subsequently donated these collections to the UMMA in 
November of 1978. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. The 1 associated 
funerary object present is a animal bone.
    In 1940, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were 
removed from the Schreiber site in (20SL3) Sanilac County, MI. A 
landowner collected the remains of three adults, along with two 
associated funerary objects, from a site near the shore of Lake Huron 
and donated these collections to the UMMA on October 26, 1940. The 
human remains date to the Early Late Woodland Period (500-1000 A.D.) 
based on diagnostic artifacts. No known individuals were identified. 
The 2 associated funerary objects present are both ceramic sherds.
    At some time during or prior to June of 1926, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 7 individuals were removed from the Warren 
Clough site (20SE29) in Shiawassee County, MI. The UMMA's Emerson 
Greenman excavated the remains of five adults, one adolescent, and one 
child from one of three mounds that comprised the site. Museum records 
indicate that either looters or amateur archeologists had destroyed the 
other mounds. The human remains date to the Woodland Period (500-1400 
A.D.) based on mortuary practices. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 
individuals were removed from the Gilde-Thorpe site (20SE8) in 
Shiawassee County, MI. Construction workers engaged in gravel 
operations collected the remains of one adult male and one child, along 
with two associated funerary objects. Red ochre was noted as being 
present in the burials. The human remains were donated to the UMMA in 
1983. The human remains date to the Archaic Period (3500-500 B.C.) 
based on mortuary treatment. No known individuals were identified. The 
2 associated funerary objects present are 1 piece of red ochre and 1 
piece of yellow ochre.

Determinations Made by the University of Michigan Museum of 
Anthropology

    Officials of the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on cranial morphology, dental 
traits, accession documentation, and archeological context.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 101 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 220 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day 
Indian tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed is the aboriginal land of the Bad River Band of the Lake 
Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, 
Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett 
Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Chippewa-Cree Indians 
of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, 
Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of 
the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa 
and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; 
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of 
Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of 
Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of 
Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Mille 
Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Nottawaseppi 
Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as the Huron 
Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and 
Indiana; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the 
Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Quechan Tribe of the Fort 
Yuma Indian Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake 
Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa 
Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault 
Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa 
Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle 
Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; White Earth Band of 
the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; and the Wyandotte Nation.
     Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate 
that the land from which the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The 
Tribes.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects may be to The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Ben 
Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of the 
Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., 
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone (734) 647-9085, email 
bsecunda@umich.edu, by December 2, 2013. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may 
proceed.
    The University of Michigan is responsible for notifying The Tribes 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 16, 2013.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2013-25989 Filed 10-30-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P



Back to the top