[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 128 (Tuesday, July 3, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 39505-39506]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office 
[www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-16205]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-10417; 2200-1100-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Wesleyan University, Middleton, CT

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Wesleyan University, Middleton, CT, has completed an 
inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian 
tribes, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between 
the human remains and present-day Indian tribes. Representatives of any 
Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the 
human remains may contact Wesleyan University, Middleton, CT. 
Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below may 
occur if no additional claimants come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact Wesleyan 
University, Middleton, CT, at the address below by August 2, 2012.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Sonia Ma[ntilde]jon, Chief Diversity Officer, Wesleyan 
University, 237 High Street, Middletown, CT 06457, telephone (860) 685-
3927.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the 
possession of Wesleyan University, Middleton, CT. The human remains were 
removed from Hamilton County, TN.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, 
institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American 
human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Wesleyan 
University professional staff in consultation with representatives of 
Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern Band of 
Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; 
Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; and the United Keetoowah Band of 
Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma.

History and Description of the Remains

    In the late 1800s, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from Hamilton County, TN, during exploration of 
a mound on William's Island (site 40Ha60) by George D. Barnes, an amateur 
collector from Dayton, TN, with the permission of the landowner. This is 
part of a larger collection purchased from Barnes by A.R. Crittenden of 
Middletown, CT, in 1896 and deposited in the Wesleyan University Museum 
until the purchase price ($1000) could be raised by the Wesleyan 
University Museum. The collection was officially purchased by the 
Wesleyan University Museum in 1899. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present. The majority of the material 
culture from William's Island site has been provisionally assigned to the 
mid/late Mississippian period (late prehistoric/early historic). The 
human remains are Native American based on the site context.
    In the late 1800s, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from a mound 12 miles north of Chattanooga, TN, 
on the Yarnell (or Garnell) farm by George D. Barnes, an amateur 
collector from Dayton, TN. This is part of a larger collection purchased 
from Barnes by A. R. Crittenden of Middletown, CT, in 1896 and deposited 
in the Wesleyan University Museum until the purchase price ($1000) could 
be raised by the Wesleyan University Museum. The collection was 
officially purchased by the Wesleyan University Museum in 1899. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. 
The mound is believed to be date to the Mississippian period. The human 
remains are Native American based on the mound context.
    In the late 1800s, human remains representing, at minimum, five 
individuals were removed from ``vicinity of Chattanooga,'' in Hamilton 
County, TN, by George D. Barnes, an amateur collector from Dayton, TN. 
This is part of a larger collection purchased from Barnes by A. R. 
Crittenden of Middletown, CT, in 1896 and deposited in the Wesleyan 
University Museum until the purchase price ($1000) could be raised by the 
Wesleyan University Museum. The collection was officially purchased by 
the Wesleyan University Museum in 1899. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains 
are Native American based on the collecting practices of Mr. Barnes.
    Archeological evidence, oral tradition, and geographical location 
supports a cultural affiliation determination to all three Federally 
recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern Band of 
Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; and the United Keetoowah Band of 
Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma), which were one group until their forced 
relocation known as The Trail of Tears, which resulted from the Indian 
Relocation Act of 1830. Oral tradition supports archeological research 
that suggests a much longer Cherokee occupation of the region associated 
with the upper Tennessee, Little Tennessee, and Hiwassee rivers. 
According to one source, ``[d]ue to similar culturally conservative 
traits, such as commonality in burial practices, house patterns, and 
community organization, a temporal progression is suggested from Dallas 
to Mouse Creek to Overhill Cherokee based on shifts in ceramic styles, 
settlement characteristics, and sociopolitical organizations'' (Schroedl, 
1986). The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians support this conclusion, and 
their oral tradition reinforces this determination. Based on the Indian 
Claims Commission decision, Hamilton County, TN, is the aboriginal 
territory of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Based on Indian Land 
Cessions 1784-
1894, Hamilton County, TN, is the aboriginal territory of all three 
Federally recognized Cherokee tribes.

Determinations Made by Wesleyan University

    Officials of Wesleyan University have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this 
notice represent the physical remains of ten individuals of Native 
American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared 
group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains is to the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern Band of 
Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; and the United Keetoowah Band of 
Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally

[[Page 39506]]

affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Sonia Ma[ntilde]jon, 
Chief Diversity Officer, Wesleyan University, 237 High Street, 
Middletown, CT 06457, telephone (860) 685-3927, before August 2, 2012. 
Repatriation of the human remains to the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; 
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; and the United 
Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma may proceed after that 
date if no additional claimants come forward.
    Wesleyan University is responsible for notifying the Cherokee Nation, 
Oklahoma; Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of 
North Carolina; Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek 
Indians of Alabama; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in 
Oklahoma that this notice has been published.

    Dated: May 23, 2012.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2012-16205 Filed 7-2-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P






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