[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 63 (Monday, April 2, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 19687-19689]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office 
[www.gpo.gov ]
[FR Doc No: 2012-7890]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and 
Recreation, Sacramento, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The California Department of Parks and Recreation has completed an 
inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation 
with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is a 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary 
objects and present-day Indian tribes. Representatives of any Indian tribe 
that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and 
associated funerary objects may contact the California Department of Parks 
and Recreation. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional 
claimants come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural 
affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects should 
contact the California Department of Parks and Recreation at the address 
below by May 2, 2012.

ADDRESSES: Rebecca Carruthers, NAGPRA Coordinator, California Department of 
Parks and Recreation, 1416 9th Street, Room 902, Sacramento, CA 95814, 
telephone (916) 653-8893.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native 
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of 
the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects under the control of the California Department of Parks and 
Recreation. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed 
from ten sites located in northeastern San Diego County, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, 
institution or Federal

[[Page 19688]]

agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated 
funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by the California Department of Parks and Recreation 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Agua Caliente 
Band of Cahuilla Indians of the Agua Caliente Indian Reservation, California; 
Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians, California (formerly the Augustine Band 
of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Augustine Reservation); Cabazon Band of 
Mission Indians, California; Cahuilla Band of Mission Indians of the Cahuilla 
Reservation, California; Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeno Indians, 
California (formerly the Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla & Cupeno Indians of the 
Los Coyotes Reservation); Morongo Band of Mission Indians, California 
(formerly the Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Morongo 
Reservation); Ramona Band of Cahuilla, California (formerly the Ramona Band 
or Village of Cahuilla Mission Indians of California); Santa Rosa Band of 
Cahuilla Indians, California (formerly the Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla 
Mission Indians of the Santa Rosa Reservation); and Torres-
Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians, California (formerly the Torres-
Martinez Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of California) (hereafter referred 
to as ``The Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    The human remains and associated funerary objects listed in this notice 
were removed from ten sites located in northeastern San Diego County, CA. The 
geographical location of these ten sites indicates the human remains were 
recovered within the historically documented territory of the Cahuilla. The 
traditional aboriginal territory of the Cahuilla, as defined by 
anthropologist Lowell John Bean, encompasses a geographically diverse area of 
mountains, valleys and low desert zones. The southernmost boundary 
approximately followed a line from just below Borrego Springs to the north 
end of the Salton Basin and the Chocolate Mountains. The eastern boundary ran 
along the summit of the San Bernardino Mountains. The northern boundary stood 
within the San Jacinto Plain near Riverside, while the base of Palomar 
Mountain formed the western boundary. According to Bean and archeologist 
William D. Strong, the northern end of Anza Borrego Desert State Park lies 
within the traditional territory of the Cahuilla and includes the areas of 
Borrego Palm Canyon, Coyote Canyon, Clark Valley, the Santa Rosa Mountains, 
Jackass Flat, Rockhouse Canyon and Horse Canyon.
    In April of 1972, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from site CA-SDI-343 (Santa Caterina/Lower Willows) in the 
Coyote Canyon area of Anza Borrego Desert State Park by Professor Paul Ezell 
and archeology students from San Diego State University. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The age of the 
human remains is unknown.
    At an unknown date in the 1970s, a cremated human bone representing, at 
minimum, one individual was removed from site CA-SDI-
489 (Ocotillo Flats) in the Coyote Canyon area of Anza Borrego Desert State 
Park by archeologist William Seidel during a survey of the area. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The 
age of the human remains is unknown.
    At an unknown date in the 1970s, a cremated human bone representing, at 
minimum, one individual was removed from site CA-SDI-
1116 in the Coyote Canyon area of Anza Borrego Desert State Park by 
archeologist William Seidel during a survey of the area. No known individual 
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The age of the 
human remains is unknown.
    In 1955, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were 
removed from site CA-SDI-1465 (Hidden Springs) in the Borrego Palm Canyon and 
Jackass Flats areas of Anza Borrego Desert State Park. No known individuals 
were identified. The 40 associated funerary objects are 1 quartzite flake; 8 
potsherds of undetermined ware; 6 buffware potsherds; 11 potsherds in pieces; 
1 flake of obsidian shatter; 1 obsidian finishing/resharpening flake (source 
determined to be Obsidian Butte); 2 obsidian finishing/resharpening flakes; 1 
quartz flake; 1 charred Agavaceae seed; 1 green fused shale biface tip; 1 
burnt wonderstone flake; 2 burned worked faunal bone fragments; l lot of 
faunal bone fragments; 1 lot of unidentified faunal bone fragments; 1 burnt 
Olivella dama shell bead; and 1 burnt shell disk bead (possibly an Olivella 
callus or clam shell disk bead). The age of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects is unknown.
    At an unknown date in the 1970s, human cranial bone fragments 
representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site CA-SDI-
2366 (Carlburg) located near Clark Dry Lake in Anza Borrego Desert State Park 
by archeologist William Seidel. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present. The age of the human remains is 
unknown.
    At an unknown date in the 1990s, a cremated human bone representing, at 
minimum, one individual was removed from the surface of site CA-SDI-16494 
(Horse Camp) in the Coyote Canyon area of Anza Borrego Desert State Park by 
California State Parks Archaeologist Rae Schwaderer. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The age of the human 
remains is unknown.
    At an unknown date in the 1970s, human bone fragments representing, at 
minimum, two individuals were removed from an unidentified site located south 
of the elementary school in Borrego Springs, CA by archeologist William 
Seidel. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present. The age of the human remains is unknown.
    At an unknown date in the late 1950s or early 1960s, a human bone 
representing, at minimum, one individual was removed from an unidentified 
site described as a ``sand dune in Clark Dry Lake'' approximately seven miles 
northeast of Borrego Springs, CA, by archeologist William Wallace. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The 
age of the human remains is unknown.
    On March 5, 1955, human bones representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from an unidentified site described as a ``sand dune in Clark 
Dry Lake'' in Anza Borrego Desert State Park by Ben McCown. No known 
individual was identified. The 181 associated funerary objects are 1 lot of 
burnt shell beads; 1 granite mano fragment; 2 fragments of obsidian shatter; 
4 wonderstone flakes; 1 wonderstone cottonwood triangular projectile point; 3 
faunal bones; 1 lot of burnt faunal bone; and 168 potsherds. The age of the 
human remains is unknown; however, the cottonwood triangular projectile 
suggests a date for both the remains and associated funerary objects in the 
``Late Period.''
    In 1975 and 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from site CA-SD-98 in the Borrego Palm Canyon area of Anza 
Borrego Desert State Park by archeologist William Seidel. No known individual 
was identified. The 33 associated funerary objects are 2 lots of faunal 
bones; 8 soil samples; 1 lot of

[[Page 19689]]

Olivella biplicata rough disk shell beads; 2 lots of various shell fragments; 
3 ceramic pipe fragments; 1 polished bone fragment; 1 rusted square nail; 2 
rusted iron fragments; 1 sample of organic matter; 5 projectile points or 
fragmentary projectile points; 1 lot of obsidian flakes; 1 lot of wonderstone 
flakes; 1 lot of quartz flakes; 1 lot of quartzite flakes; 1 lot of sherds 
representing a painted pottery scoop of Tumco Buffware; 1 lot of sherds of 
pottery with an undetermined ware; and 1 lot of Brownware pottery sherds.
    The human remains and associated funerary objects listed above were 
stored at facilities within the Colorado Desert District of the California 
Department of Parks and Recreation until an inventory effort was begun in 
2004. Since then, the remains have been stored at the Bigole Archaeological 
Research Center (BARC-2) in Borrego Springs, CA.

Determinations made by the California Department of Parks and Recreation

    Officials of the California Department of Parks and Recreation have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this 
notice represent the physical remains of fifteen individuals of Native 
American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 254 associated funerary objects 
are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human 
remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group 
identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human 
remains and The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally 
affiliated with the human remains should contact Rebecca Carruthers, NAGPRA 
Coordinator, California Department of Parks and Recreation, 1416 9th Street, 
Room 902, telephone (916) 653-8893, before May 2, 2012. Repatriation of the 
human remains to The Tribes may proceed after that date if no additional 
claimants come forward.
    The California Department of Parks and Recreation is responsible for 
notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: March 28, 2012.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2012-7890 Filed 3-30-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P






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