FR Doc 2010-23915[Federal Register: September 24, 2010 (Volume 75, Number 185)]
[Notices]               
[Page 58430-58431]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr24se10-127]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service
 
Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Montana, Missoula, 
MT

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.
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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and an associated funerary 
object in the possession of the University of Montana, Missoula, MT. 
The human remains and associated funerary object were removed from a 
location in western Montana and Missoula County, MT.

[[Page 58431]]

    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary object. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University 
of Montana, Department of Anthropology, professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Confederated Salish & Kootenai 
Tribes of the Flathead Reservation, Montana.
    In 1950, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from a location in western Montana. According to a slip of 
paper in the box with the human remains, the burial was recovered from 
under a conical rock mound and appeared to be a secondary burial of 
disarticulated bones and excavated by a University of Montana 
archeological team, led by Carling Malouf. The slip of paper also 
indicates that the burial was excavated from a site "located a few 
yards away from those found earlier by Turney-High and White." No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Harry H. Turney-High and Thain White were known to excavate in 
western Montana in the vicinity of the Flathead Reservation where White 
owned property; therefore, museum officials reasonably believe that 
these remains are from western Montana and from White's private 
property on the Flathead Reservation. This region was occupied 
prehistorically and historically by the Salish and Kootenai tribes.
    In 1952, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from the University of Montana campus, Missoula County, 
MT. The remains were excavated by Carling Malouf. No known individuals 
were identified. The one associated funerary object is a set of glass 
beads.
    The set of beads - colors, size, manufacture and shape - provide 
both a temporal period and cultural affiliation. According to 
archeologist W. Mark Timmons, dyed beads were manufactured starting in 
1850 and the wide use of dyed beads peaked in the 1880s. The remaining 
beads in the collection appear to be of an older origin, and when 
compared with the beads recovered from the Saleesh House excavations 
they seem similar in size, color, and manufacture. Considering that the 
Saleesh House operated by Salish Tribal members until the early 1850s, 
and the presence of only a few dyed beads in the assemblage, a burial 
date in the range of the 1860s to the 1870s would seem to be a 
reasonable inference. In addition, a tribal representative has 
identified Missoula County, MT, as part of the Salish and Kootenai 
tribes traditional occupation area. This region was occupied 
prehistorically and historically by Salish and Kootenai tribes.
    Officials of the University of Montana have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above 
represent the physical remains of three individuals of Native American 
ancestry. Officials of the University of Montana also have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described above 
is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual 
human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite 
or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the University of Montana have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship 
of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary object and the 
Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation, 
Montana.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and/or associated 
funerary object should contact John Douglas, Chair and Professor, 
Department of Anthropology, University of Montana, 32 Campus Dr., 
Missoula, MT 39812, telephone (406) 243-4246, before October 25, 2010. 
Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the 
Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation, 
Montana, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    The University of Montana is responsible for notifying the 
Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation, 
Montana, that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 10, 2010
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2010-23915 Filed 9-23-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S




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