FR Doc E9-22220[Federal Register: September 15, 2009 (Volume 74, Number 177)]
[Notices]               
[Page 47270-47271]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr15se09-118]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of 
Dentistry, New York, NY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.
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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human 
remains

[[Page 47271]]

were removed from Santa Barbara County, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by New York 
University College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of 
the Santa Ynez Reservation, California.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from the Burton Mound, Santa Barbara County, 
CA, by an unknown individual. In 1924, the human remains were acquired 
by Frederick Hodge, and he donated the human remains to the Museum of 
the American Indian, Heye Foundation that same year. In 1956, the human 
remains were transferred to Dr. Theodore Kazamiroff, New York 
University College of Dentistry. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Museum of the American Indian records list the locality of origin 
as the Burton Mound, Santa Barbara, CA. The morphology of the human 
remains is consistent with Native American ancestry. Burton Mound was 
located at the Chumash village of Syujtun at the time of Spanish 
contact, in 1542. The inhabitants of the village were identified as 
Barbareno Chumash. Use of the mound stopped in the early 19th century 
and the Spanish settled in the area. Artifacts found in the mound 
suggest that it dates to the Prehistoric and Protohistoric phases of 
the Late Horizon.
    In 1919, human remains representing a minimum of 71 individuals 
were removed from San Miguel Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ralph 
Glidden, as part of a Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation 
expedition. In 1956, the human remains were transferred to Dr. Theodore 
Kazamiroff, New York University College of Dentistry. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Museum of the American Indian records list the locality of origin 
as San Miguel Island, CA, but do not list a specific site or sites from 
which the human remains were removed. The morphology of the human 
remains is consistent with Native American ancestry. San Miguel Island 
has a long occupation history with strong evidence for group continuity 
over millennia. The island was vacated by the 19th century, as the 
remaining residents were relocated to Spanish missions on the mainland. 
The inhabitants of the island were identified as Island Chumash 
speakers.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, 
CA, during the DeMoss Bowers expedition. In 1915, the human remains 
were donated to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. In 
1956, the human remains were transferred to Dr. Theodore Kazamiroff, 
New York University College of Dentistry. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Museum of the American Indian records list the locality of origin 
as Santa Cruz Island, CA, but do not list a specific site from which 
the human remains were removed. The morphology of the human remains is 
consistent with Native American ancestry. Santa Cruz Island has a long 
occupation history with strong evidence for group continuity over 
millennia. The island was vacated by the 19th century, as the remaining 
residents were relocated to Spanish missions on the mainland. The 
inhabitants of the island were identified as Island Chumash speakers.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of nine 
individuals were removed from Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, 
CA, by an unknown individual. The human remains were in the collection 
of Louis Dreyfus when it was purchased by the Museum of the American 
Indian, Heye Foundation in 1917. In 1956, the human remains were 
transferred to Dr. Theodore Kazamiroff, New York University College of 
Dentistry. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Museum of the American Indian records list the locality of origin 
as Santa Cruz Island, CA, but do not list a specific site or sites from 
which the human remains were removed. The morphology of the human 
remains is consistent with Native American ancestry. Santa Cruz Island 
has a long occupation history, with strong evidence for group 
continuity over millennia. The island was vacated by the 19th century, 
as the remaining residents were relocated to Spanish missions on the 
mainland. Inhabitants of the island were identified as Island Chumash 
speakers.
    Consultation, historical, and archeological evidence indicate that 
Santa Barbara, San Miguel Island, and Santa Cruz Island are part of the 
traditional territory of the Chumash. Tribal representatives identify 
the Northern Channel Islands and the mainland along the Santa Barbara 
Channel, as the traditional territory of the Chumash tribes. On the 
mainland, archeological data from the early historic sites shows strong 
continuity with Protohistoric and Late Horizon material. On the 
islands, there is archeological evidence of continuous occupation by 
the same group of people for at least 4,000 years.
    The first historic records of the Chumash villages in the Santa 
Barbara area date to 1542. By 1805, the Chumash remaining in the area 
were relocated onto five missions in the vicinity of Santa Barbara and 
Ventura, on the mainland of California. The missions were secularized 
and largely abandoned by the Chumash in 1832. In 1855, the Santa Ynez 
Reservation was created for the Chumash, and the Santa Ynez Band of 
Chumash was recognized in 1901.
    Officials of New York University College of Dentistry have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of 82 individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of New York University College of 
Dentistry also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), 
there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the Native American human remains and the Santa Ynez 
Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, 
California.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Louis Terracio, New York University College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th 
St., New York, NY 10010, telephone (212) 998-9917, before October 15, 
2009. Repatriation of the human remains to the Santa Ynez Band of 
Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The New York University College of Dentistry is responsible for 
notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa 
Ynez Reservation, California that this notice has been published.

    Dated: June 15, 2009
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E9-22220 Filed 9-14-09; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4312-50-S


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