FR Doc 04-6652
[Federal Register: March 25, 2004 (Volume 69, Number 58)]
[Notices]               
[Page 15367-15368]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr25mr04-92]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion: Anthropological Studies Center, 
Archaeological Collections Facility at Sonoma State University, Rohnert 
Park, CA.

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the Anthropological Studies Center, 
Archaeological Collections Facility at Sonoma State University, Rohnert 
Park, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
recovered from two sites in Mendocino County, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of 
the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The 
National Park Services is not responsible for the determinations within 
this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
Anthropological Studies Center professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Round Valley Indian Tribes of the Round Valley 
Reservation, California.
    Between November 1977 and May 1978, human remains were recovered 
from the Kopase site (CA-MEN-69) near Covelo, Mendocino County, CA, 
during salvage excavations conducted by archeologist Barry Price. In 
1978, human remains representing a minimum of 11 individuals were 
identified from the Kopase site collections and were reburied at the 
site. The remaining archeological collections from the Kopase site were 
in Mr. Price's possession for analysis from 1978 to April 1994, after 
which they were returned to the Anthropological Studies Center, 
Archaeological Collections Facility, Sonoma State University. In 1997, 
additional human remains representing a minimum of 20 individuals were 
identified during an inventory of the collections from the Kopase site. 
The human remains include disassociated fragments from 4 of the 
individuals reburied in 1978, and the fragmentary remains of 16 other 
individuals. Discovery of the additional human remains brings the total 
number of individuals recovered from the Kopase site to 27. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present. Radiocarbon dates and analysis of the archeological collection 
from the Kopase site indicate that the human remains were probably 
buried between 300 B.C. and A.D. 200.
    In October 1979, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were recovered from the Eel River Work Center site (CA-MEN-
320/643) near Covelo, Mendocino County, CA, by staff of the 
Anthropological Studies Center under the direction of Dr. David A. 
Fredrickson. All identified human remains were reburied at the site in 
1985. In 1997, additional human remains representing one individual 
were identified during an inventory of the collections from the Eel 
River Work Center site. Due to the disturbed nature of the original 
burial, it cannot be determined if the human remains identified in 1997 
are from the same individual reburied in 1985. Thus, the evidence 
indicates the possibility that the remains represent two individuals. 
No known individuals were identified. One chert scraper was identified 
within the burial matrix during excavation and seven additional 
artifacts were listed in the catalog as possible associated funerary 
objects, for a total of eight associated funerary objects. The eight 
associated funerary objects include one shell bead, three projectile 
points, one chert scraper, and three grinding stone implements. 
Analysis of the associated funerary objects and the archeological 
collection from the Eel River Work Center site indicates that the human 
remains were probably buried between A.D. 300 and A.D. 1500.
    The human remains have been identified as Native American based on 
archeological evidence from the Kopase and Eel River Work Center sites. 
Radiocarbon dates and analysis of artifacts from the Kopase and Eel 
River Work Center sites indicate that these human remains and 
associated funerary objects date to between 300 B.C. and A.D. 1500. 
Ethnographic and archeological evidence indicates that the Kopase and 
Eel River Work Center sites are located within traditional Central Yuki 
territory. Ethnographic accounts and information provided by 
representatives of the Round Valley Indian Tribes of the Round Valley 
Reservation, California demonstrate cultural affiliation with the human 
remains, as the Round Valley Indian Tribes are composed of descendants 
of Yuki, Concow Maidu, Little Lake and other Pomo, Nomlaki, Cahto, 
Wailaki, and Pit River peoples.
    The professional staff of the Anthropological Studies Center, 
Archaeological Collections Facility at Sonoma State University have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001, the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of 21 individuals of 
Native American ancestry. The professional staff of the Anthropological 
Studies Center, Archaeological Collections Facility at Sonoma State 
University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 
(3)(A), the eight objects described above are reasonably believed to 
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of 
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, the 
professional staff of the Anthropological Studies Center, 
Archaeological Collections Facility at Sonoma State University have

[[Page 15368]]

determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects described above and the Round Valley Indian Tribes of the Round 
Valley Reservation, California.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects described above should contact Regina George, NAGPRA Project 
Coordinator, Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections 
Facility, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA 94928-3609, 
telephone (707) 664-2381, before April 26, 2004. Repatriation of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects described above to the 
Round Valley Indian Tribes of the Round Valley Reservation, California 
may begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections 
Facility, Sonoma State University is responsible for notifying the 
Round Valley Indian Tribes of the Round Valley Reservation, California 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: February 9, 2004.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources.
[FR Doc. 04-6652 Filed 3-24-04; 8:45 am]

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