[Federal Register: October 9, 2001 (Volume 66, Number 195)]
[Notices]
[Page 51462-51463]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr09oc01-130]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Peabody Museum
of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology
and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary
objects was made by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
professional staff in consultation with the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal
Town, Oklahoma; Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe of
Indians of Florida; Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of
Creek Indians of Alabama; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe
of Florida, Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa
Reservations; and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma.
    In 1929, human remains representing two individuals from Stalling's
Island Mound, Columbia County, GA, were acquired by the Peabody Museum
of Archaeology and Ethnology. These human remains were collected during
a 1928-29 expedition sponsored by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology and led by Cornelius B. and Harriet S. Cosgrove with William
Claflin. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    This interment disturbed a previous burial, which contained a
carved shell gorget that dates to the Hollywood phase of the Late
Mississippian period (A.D. 1250-1450). Because this interment disturbed
the previous burial, it is reasonably assumed that these human remains
date to the Late Mississippian period (A.D. 1250-1450) or Protohistoric
period (A.D. 1450-1650) and that the individuals are Native American.
Oral traditions as well as ethnohistoric and archeological
documentation support Stalling's Island Mound as being within the
aboriginal and historical homelands of the Creek, Miccosukkee, and
Seminole peoples during the Hollywood phase of the Mississippian
period. With the abandonment of the Stalling's Island settlement just
prior to European contact, the population transferred to three distinct
tribal towns on the mainland, Coweta, Hitchiti, and Kashita. The
Hitchiti are recognized bands among the Miccosukee and Seminole today,
and the towns were distinct entities within the Creek, Miccosukee, and
Seminole peoples until recent times. These peoples are represented
today by the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Kialegee Tribal
Town, Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida; Muscogee
(Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama;
Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe of Florida, Dania, Big
Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations; and Thlopthlocco
Tribal Town, Oklahoma.
    In 1929, cultural items from Stalling's Island Mound, Columbia
County, GA, were acquired by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology. These objects, one large vessel with complicated stamped
decorations and one plain bowl, were collected during a 1928-29
expedition sponsored by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
and led by Cornelius B. and Harriet S. Cosgrove with William Claflin.
    Based on ceramic style, the vessels are dated to the Hollywood
phase of the Late Mississippian period (A.D. 1250-1450). The vessels
have been identified as associated funerary objects as defined in 43
CFR 10.2 (d)(2)(i) because, in

[[Page 51463]]

museum documentation, the vessels are described as an urn burial and
therefore were made to contain human remains. The burial context
indicates that the burial was of a Native American. The Peabody Museum
of Archaeology and Ethnology does not have possession or control of the
human remains from this burial. Oral traditions as well as
ethnohistoric and archeological documentation support Stalling's Island
Mound as being within the aboriginal and historical homelands of Creek,
Seminole, and Miccosukee people during the Hollywood phase of the Late
Mississippian period. With the abandonment of the Stalling's Island
settlement just prior to European contact, the population transferred
to three distinct tribal towns on the mainland, Coweta, Hitchiti, and
Kashita. The Hitchiti are recognized bands among the Miccosukee and
Seminole today, and the towns were distinct entities within the Creek,
Miccosukee, and Seminole peoples until recent times. These peoples are
represented today by the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma;
Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida;
Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of
Alabama; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe of Florida, Dania,
Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations; and Thlopthlocco
Tribal Town, Oklahoma.
    In 1985, cultural items from Stalling's Island Mound, Columbia
County, GA, were donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology as part of the William Claflin Collection. These objects, a
fragmentary vessel (represented by two sherds) with complicated stamped
decorations and one plain bowl, were collected during a 1928-29
expedition sponsored by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
and led by Cornelius B. and Harriet S. Cosgrove with William Claflin.
    Based on ceramic style, the vessels are dated to the Hollywood
phase of the Late Mississippian period (A.D. 1250-1450). The vessels
have been identified as associated funerary objects as defined in 43
CFR 10.2 (d)(2)(i) because, in museum documentation, the vessels are
described as an urn burial and therefore were made to contain human
remains. The burial context indicates that the burial was of a Native
American. The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology does not have
possession or control of the human remains from this burial. Oral
traditions as well as ethnohistoric and archeological documentation
support Stalling's Island Mound as being within the aboriginal and
historical homelands of Creek, Seminole, and Miccosukee peoples during
the Hollywood phase of the Late Mississippian period. With the
abandonment of the Stalling's Island settlement just prior to European
contact, the population transferred to three distinct tribal towns on
the mainland, Coweta, Hitchiti, and Kashita. The Hitchiti are
recognized bands among the Miccosukee and Seminole today, and the towns
were distinct entities within the Creek, Miccosukee, and Seminole
peoples until recent times. These peoples are represented today by the
Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Kialegee Tribal Town,
Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida; Muscogee (Creek)
Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; Seminole
Nation of Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe of Florida, Dania, Big Cypress,
Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations; and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town,
Oklahoma.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the Peabody
Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined that, pursuant to
43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the
physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry.
Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology also have
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2)(i), the four objects
listed above are reasonably believed to have been made to contain human
remains. Lastly, officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced
between these Native American human remains and associated funerary
objects and the Creek, Miccosukee, and Seminole peoples, who are
represented by the following federally recognized groups: Alabama-
Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma;
Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida; Muscogee (Creek) Nation,
Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; Seminole Nation of
Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe of Florida, Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton,
Hollywood & Tampa Reservations; and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Alabama-Quassarte
Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe
of Indians of Florida; Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band
of Creek Indians of Alabama; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Seminole
Tribe of Florida, Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa
Reservations; and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town. Representatives of any
other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated
with these human remains and associated funerary objects should contact
Patricia Capone, Repatriation Coordinator, Peabody Museum of
Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue,
Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617) 496-3702, before November 8, 2001.
Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to
the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Kialegee Tribal Town,
Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida; Muscogee (Creek)
Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; Seminole
Nation of Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe of Florida, Dania, Big Cypress,
Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations; and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town
may begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: July 18, 2001.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 01-25143 Filed 10-5-01; 8:45 am]
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