[Federal Register: October 5, 2001 (Volume 66, Number 194)]
[Notices]
[Page 51060-51062]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr05oc01-121]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Peabody Museum
of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with the provisions of the
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 42 CFR
10.9, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology
and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary
objects was made by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cayuga
Nation of New York; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of
Indians, Oklahoma; Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of
Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation of New York; St. Regis Band of Mohawk
Indians of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of
Oklahoma; Stockbridge-Munsee Community of Mohican Indians of Wisconsin;
Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York; Tuscarora Nation of New
York; and the nonfederally recognized Mohawk Nation Council of Chiefs.
    In 1886, human remains representing five individuals were donated
to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology by W.W. Adams.
Museum documentation indicates that in 1886, two of these individuals
were recovered by Mr. Adams from the St. Joseph site in Union Springs,
NY. According to museum documentation, Mr. Adams recovered three other
individuals from Cayuga County, NY, the same year, but there is no
additional provenience information available for these remains. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Museum information indicates that the interments from the St.
Joseph site most likely date to the Late Woodland period (A.D. 1000-
1600). Artifacts recovered from the site, but not associated with the
burials, are stylistically indicative of the Late Woodland period.
These objects include stone mortars and ceramics of typical Iroquoian
designs. The location of copper staining on the human remains suggests
the use of a shroud pin, and it is therefore likely that these
interments date to the Contact or Historic period (post-A.D. 1500).
    In 1889, human remains representing 21 individuals were recovered
from Avon, NY, by F.W. Putnam, who donated the remains to the Peabody
Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology the same year. No known individuals
were identified. The 592 associated funerary objects include copper,
glass, shell, and catlinite beads; ceramic sherds and vessels; wooden
knife handle fragments; animal bones and teeth, including bird bones
and a portion of a tortoise carapace rim; chipped chert; hematite; a
tomahawk; iron knives, an iron point, and iron fragments; pewter
implements; a brass kettle; sheet brass; a copper-plated iron bell;
sheet copper; copper ornaments; a shell pendant; a textile fragment; a
piece of lead; and a fossil.
    Documentary records in the possession of the Peabody Museum of
Archaeology and Ethnology indicate that these remains came from a
series of excavations led by Mr. Putnam at burial locations in Avon.
The exact locations of these excavations are not documented, although
two specific sites, the Brush Creek and Fort Hill sites, are described
in the field notebook. Museum documentation indicates that the Fort
Hill site was located on Anson Miller's farm. It is likely that these
two sites are adjacent to each other, possibly separated by Brush
Creek. The sites are thought to be located in the vicinity of the
Bosley Mill site along Route 15, near Trip Hammer Road, in the
southeastern section of Avon. More precise provenience information is
not available. Museum information indicates that interments from the
sites most likely date to the Historic period (post-A.D. 1700).

[[Page 51061]]

Artifacts recovered with the burials date from the 17th and 18th
centuries. The lack of a fortified village enclosure and the dispersed
settlement pattern further suggest that the remains were interred after
1675.
    In 1889, human remains representing one individual were donated to
the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology by Anson Miller. Museum
documentation indicates that Mr. Miller recovered these remains,
probably the same year, from Avon, NY. No known individual was
identified. The 25 associated funerary objects include parts of 2
ceramic vessels.
    Documentary records in the possession of the Peabody Museum of
Archaeology and Ethnology indicate that these remains came from the
same area as a series of excavations led by F.W. Putnam at burial
locations in Avon in 1889, and that the remains are from the (Anson)
Miller's Farm site. These burial sites are thought to be located in the
vicinity of the Bosley Mill site along Route 15, near Trip Hammer Road,
in the southeastern section of Avon. Museum information indicates that
interments from this series of sites most likely date to the Historic
period (post-A.D. 1700). The lack of a fortified village enclosure and
the dispersed settlement pattern further suggest that the remains were
interred after 1675.
    In 1896, human remains representing one individual were recovered
near Buffalo, NY, during a Peabody Museum expedition led by F.W.
Putnam. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    Museum documentation indicates that these remains were recovered
from a village site near Buffalo. This interment most likely dates to
the Contact period (A.D. 1500-1700). Although no artifacts are known to
be associated with the remains, other artifacts recovered from the site
date to the early Contact period. These objects include fragments of
brass and copper sheeting and triangular stone projectile points.
    In 1903, human remains representing 122 individuals were recovered
from Brant, NY, during a Peabody Museum expedition led by M.R.
Harrington and A.C. Parker. No known individuals were identified. The
1,478 associated funerary objects include charred corn and acorns;
potter's stones, polishing stones, nutting stones and other worked
stones; broken celts; flaked chert and debitage; a piece of chipped
quartz or red jasper; ceramic sherds, vessels and pipes; iron knives,
scissors, awls, and an axe; pigment; glass, shell, catlinite, copper,
and brass beads; bracelets of iron, brass, and wire; brass jingles,
brass earrings, and a brass point; sheet brass; broken and charred
wooden objects; shells; animal bones, hide and teeth, including fish
teeth; worked turtle shell, fragments that are probably part of a
rattle, and small pebbles from a rattle; bone tubes and an awl; antler
arrow flakers; charcoal; bark; and an organic concretion.
    Museum records indicate that these human remains and associated
funerary objects were recovered from the Silverheels site. This site is
located within the town of Brant, 1.5 miles east of the village of
Irving, on the Cattaraugus Indian Reservation, approximately 2.5 miles
upstream of Lake Erie on Cattaraugus Creek. These interments most
likely date to the Contact period (A.D. 1500-1700). Artifacts recovered
from the site which support this date include iron and early colonial
artifacts, Levanna- and Madison-style projectile points; ceramic
vessels with globular bodies, constricted, zoned incised necks, and
castellated rims; and a variety of terra cotta pipes, including pipes
with trumpet-shaped bowls and bowls with representations of human faces
and animals. In addition, multivariate attribute analysis of the
ceramic artifacts indicates that the site dates to the early 17th
century. In addition to the 1,478 associated funerary objects, a
projectile point embedded in a vertebra of an individual is included
for repatriation in this notice, although not specifically required
under NAGPRA.
    In 1904, human remains representing 36 individuals were recovered
from Ripley, NY, during a Peabody Museum expedition led by M.R.
Harrington. No known individuals were identified. The 220 associated
funerary objects include whole and broken ceramic vessels; chert knives
and stone tools, including a point, drill, and chip; a notched net
sinker; a smoothing stone; a celt; a worked stone; brass and shell
beads, an iron knife blade; an antler arrow flaker; animal claws,
bones, and teeth; bone and antler implements, including a perforator
and a hoe; a piece of worked shell; fragments of turtle shell; and red
ochre.
    Museum records indicate that these remains came from the Ripley
archeological site in the township of Ripley, approximately 5
kilometers east of the Pennsylvania border, on a sandy bluff
immediately above Lake Erie. At the time of excavation, the land was
owned by William Young. These interments most likely date to the Late
Woodland period or later (post-A.D. 1000). Radiocarbon dating indicates
that the site is multicomponent with occupations between A.D. 1300-1450
and A.D. 1550-1650. Artifacts recovered from site date to the Late
Woodland period (A.D. 1000-1600). These objects include Levanna- and
Madison-style projectile points, ceramic vessels with globular bodies,
constricted, zoned incised necks, and castellated rims, and a variety
of terra cotta pipes, including pipes with trumpet-shaped bowls and
bowls with representations of human faces and animals.
    In 1936, human remains representing one individual were discovered
uncatalogued in the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Museum
documentation suggests that these remains are from Ripley, NY. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Museum records indicate that these remains were originally from
Chautauqua County, NY. According to museum documents, the only
collection accessioned into the museum from Chautauqua County is
associated with the Ripley site. It is therefore likely that these
remains originate from that site. Radiocarbon dating indicates that the
Ripley site is multicomponent with occupations between A.D. 1300-1450
and A.D. 1550-1650. Artifacts recovered from site date to the Late
Woodland period (A.D. 1000-1600). These objects include Levanna- and
Madison-style projectile points, ceramic vessels with globular bodies,
constricted zoned incised necks, and castellated rims, and a variety of
terra cotta pipes, including pipes with trumpet-shaped bowls and bowls
with representations of human faces and animals.
    In 1905, human remains representing five individuals were recovered
from the Mohawk Valley in New York during a Peabody Museum expedition
led by M.R. Harrington and I. Hayden. The remains of three individuals
were recovered from Ephratah, Fulton County, NY. The remains of two
individuals were recovered from nearby St. Johnsville, Montgomery
County, NY. No known individuals were identified. The 29 associated
funerary objects include lithic rejects, a hammerstone, a miniature
ceramic vessel, broken pipe stems, worked deer phalanges, and ceramic
sherds.
    Museum records indicate that the remains of 3 individuals and 28
associated funerary objects came from the Garoga site, 6 miles north of
the Mohawk River, along the eastern bank of Caroga Creek, and that the
remains of 2 individuals and 1 associated funerary object came from the
Ganada site, adjacent to Crumb Creek. Remains from both sites most
likely date to the terminal Late Woodland period (A.D. 1300-1600).
Objects recovered from the

[[Page 51062]]

sites that support this date include Madison-style projectile points,
ceramic vessels with globular bodies, constricted zoned incised necks,
and castellated rims, and a variety of terra cotta pipes, including
pipes with trumpet-shaped bowls and bowls with representations of human
faces and animals. Ceramic seriation and radiocarbon dating suggest
that the sites date to A.D. 1525-1545.
    In 1921, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from Athens, PA, during a Peabody Museum expedition led by Paul F.
Scott. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    Museum documentation indicates that the site was discovered by
workmen digging a gas pipeline trench in Athens. The site is described
as being located in the narrowest portion of land between the
Susquehanna and Chemung Rivers. This interment most likely dates to the
Late Woodland period (A.D. 1000-1600). Ceramic fragments recovered from
the site, although not associated with the burial, include body sherds
with a smooth finish and a collar with a zoned, linear punctate design.
The fragments likely represent an Owasco Corded Collar, dating to the
early Late Woodland period (A.D. 1000-1300).
    In 1933, human remains representing one individual were donated to
the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology by R.P. Bigelow. Museum
documentation indicates that the remains were recovered from
Baldwinsville, NY, by an unknown collector in 1885. No known individual
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    According to museum records, the human remains came from a burial
ground in Baldwinsville. The remains were apparently excavated on the
site of the West Shore Railway in 1885. Despite a lack of documented
diagnostic artifacts, the preponderance of the evidence, based upon
museum records, indicates that these remains date to the Late Woodland
or Contact period (A.D. 1000-1700).
    In 1937, human remains representing one individual from Elmira, NY,
were donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology as part
of a collection from the Department of Archaeology, Phillips Andover
Academy, Andover, MA. According to museum records, these remains were
recovered by F. Smith before 1937. No known individual was identified.
No associated funerary objects are present.
    Museum documentation indicates that these remains come from an
Iroquois site in Elmira. Despite a lack of documented diagnostic
artifacts, the preponderance of the evidence, based upon museum
records, indicates that these remains date to the Late Woodland or
Contact period (A.D. 1000-1700).
    In 1938, human remains representing one individual from Chautauqua
County, NY, were donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology. According to museum records, these remains were collected
between 1888 and 1916. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Museum documentation describes the human remains as ``Iroquois.''
The attribution of such a specific cultural affiliation to the human
remains indicates that the interment postdates sustained contact
between indigenous groups and Europeans beginning in the 17th century.
Both consultation and historic evidence support the identification of
the area from which the human remains were recovered as Iroquois
territory at that time.
    Excavation and museum records indicate that these human remains and
associated funerary objects were removed from specific burials of
Native American individuals. Based on the date and the provenience of
the human remains and associated funerary objects from areas considered
to be aboriginal homelands and traditional burial areas of the
Iroquois, a reasonable link of shared group identity may be made
between these human remains and associated funerary objects and the
present-day tribes who represent the Iroquois: the Cayuga Nation of New
York, Oneida Nation of New York, Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin, Onondaga
Nation of New York, St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York,
Seneca Nation of New York, Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma, Tonawanda
Band of Seneca Indians of New York, and Tuscarora Nation of New York.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the Peabody
Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined that, pursuant to
43 CFR 10.2(d)(1), the human remains described above represent the
physical remains of 197 individuals of Native American ancestry.
Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology also have
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the 2,344 associated
funerary objects described above are reasonably believed to have been
placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or
later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the
Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined that,
pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group
identity that can be reasonably traced between these Native American
human remains and associated funerary objects and the Cayuga Nation of
New York, Oneida Nation of New York, Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin,
Onondaga Nation of New York, St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New
York, Seneca Nation of New York, Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma,
Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York, and Tuscarora Nation of
New York.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Cayuga Nation of New
York, Oneida Nation of New York, Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin, Onondaga
Nation of New York, St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York,
Seneca Nation of New York, Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma, Tonawanda
Band of Seneca Indians of New York, Tuscarora Nation of New York, and
the nonfederally recognized Mohawk Nation Council of Chiefs.
Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be
culturally affiliated with these objects should contact Patricia
Capone, Repatriation Coordinator, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138,
telephone (617) 496-3702, before November 5, 2001. Repatriation of
these human remains and associated funerary objects to the Cayuga
Nation of New York, Oneida Nation of New York, Oneida Tribe of
Wisconsin, Onondaga Nation of New York, St. Regis Band of Mohawk
Indians of New York, Seneca Nation of New York, Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of
Oklahoma, Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York, and Tuscarora
Nation of New York may begin after that date if no additional claimants
come forward.

    Dated: July 3, 2001.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 01-24963 Filed 10-4-01; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F
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