[Federal Register: June 21, 2001 (Volume 66, Number 120)]
[Notices]
[Page 33270-33271]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr21jn01-63]
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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Williamson
Museum, Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Natchitoches, LA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Williamson Museum,
Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Natchitoches, LA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the
Williamson Museum, Northwestern State University of Louisiana,
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Caddo
Indian Tribe of Oklahoma.
    In the 1960s, human remains representing a minimum of one
individual were recovered from the Cedar Bluff site (16WN1), Winn
Parish, LA, by Clint Pine and H.F. Gregory, who donated these remains
to the Williamson Museum, Northwestern State University of Louisiana.
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Cedar Bluff is located within 12-15 miles of sites known to have
been inhabited by two historic Caddoan speaking groups, the
Natchitoches and Doustioni. The archeological sequence derives these
tribal entities directly from a long occupation of northwestern
Louisiana by these Caddoan tribal groups. Surface collections including
sherds and projectile points suggest a Caddo II-III (Belcher-Bossier
phase, circa A.D. 1200-1500) affiliation for this site.
    In 1939-40, human remains representing one individual were
recovered from the Lawton Gin site, Natchitoches Parish, LA, by an
unknown person. In the 1960s, the remains were donated to the
Williamson Museum, Northwestern State University of Louisiana, by
Caroline Dormon. Information in the Dormon Papers in Northwestern State
University of Louisiana Archives indicates that these remains were
taken from the Lawton Gin site. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    The Lawton Gin site is a postcontact site, dating to the 1700s.
Consultation with the Caddo Tribe has identified these remains as
Caddo. In addition, archeological evidence from this and
contemporaneous sites was used to define the Lawton Phase (A.D. 1714-
1800), which has been culturally identified with the Natchitoches
confederacy of the Caddo. Lawton Phase sites cluster around
Natchitoches, which was established as a French trading post in 1714.
While other tribes visited the area to trade, the Native American
settlements were Caddoan. The archeological evidence for the cultural
continuity between Lawton Phase sites and the Caddo Tribe consists
primarily of ceramic styles, vessel forms, and geographical locations.
The historical record includes documentary and cartographic materials
describing the Natchitoches confederacy of the Caddo Tribe, which lived
along the Red River near Natchitoches.
    In the 1970s, human remains representing a minimum of one
individual were recovered from the J.C. LaCaze site, Natchitoches
Parish, LA, by Northwestern State University of Louisiana students, who
donated them to the Williamson Museum, Northwestern State University of
Louisiana. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    The remains were collected from the surface of a plowed field.
Sherd collections suggest that this midden site dates to Caddo I period
(A.D. 900-1200). Archeological evidence in northwestern Louisiana,
eastern Texas, and southwestern Arkansas suggests that the contemporary
Caddo people are the descendants of peoples whose cultural development
began in the Caddo I period.
    In the 1980s, human remains representing a minimum of one
individual were recovered from the Luster site (16NA403), Bayou Terre

[[Page 33271]]

Blanche, Natchitoches Parish, LA, by H.F. Gregory and Randall Pleasant,
who donated them to the Williamson Museum, Northwestern State
University of Louisiana. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    The remains were collected from the backdirt of a pot-hunter's
excavation. Sherd collections from this midden seem to date it to the
Caddo III-IV periods (A.D. 1200-1400). The Adaes were the nearest
historic Caddoan group. To the north were historic Yatasi villages, and
about 16 miles east were the Natchitoches villages. All of these groups
are Caddoan speakers.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the
Williamson Museum, Northwestern State University of Louisiana, have
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains
listed above represent the physical remains of four individuals of
Native American ancestry. Officials of the Williamson Museum,
Northwestern State University of Louisiana, also have determined that,
pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group
identity that can be reasonably traced between these Native American
human remains and the Caddo Indian Tribe of Oklahoma.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Caddo Indian Tribe of
Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes
itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains should
contact Dr. Pete Gregory, Director, Williamson Museum, Northwestern
State University of Louisiana, Natchitoches, LA 71497, telephone (318)
357-8170, before July 23, 2001. Repatriation of the human remains to
the Caddo Indian Tribe of Oklahoma may begin after that date if no
additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: May 25, 2001.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 01-15562 Filed 6-20-01 ; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F
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