[Federal Register: April 10, 2001 (Volume 66, Number 69)]
[Notices]
[Page 18654-18656]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr10ap01-114]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the University of
Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver,
CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the University of Denver
Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the
University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of
Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of
the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River
Reservation, Wyoming; the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck
Indian Reservation, Montana; the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma;
the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South
Dakota; the Comanche Indian Tribe, Oklahoma; the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe
of the Crow Creek Reservation, South Dakota; the Flandreau Santee Sioux
Tribe of South Dakota; the Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; the
Jicarilla Apache Tribe of the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New
Mexico; the Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe
of the Lower Brule Reservation, South Dakota; the Lower Sioux Indian
Community of Minnesota Mdewakanton Sioux Indians of the Lower Sioux;
the Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian
Reservation, Montana; the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge
Reservation, South Dakota; the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; the Prairie
Island Indian Community of Minnesota Mdewakanton Sioux Indians of the
Prairie Island Reservation, Minnesota; the Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the
Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota; the Santee Sioux Tribe of the
Santee Reservation of Nebraska; the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux
Community of Minnesota (Prior Lake); the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe
of the Lake Traverse Reservation, South Dakota; the Spirit Lake Tribe,
North Dakota (formerly known as the Devils Lake Sioux Tribe); the
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North and South Dakota; the Upper Sioux
Indian Community of the Upper Sioux Reservation, Minnesota; and the
Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota.
    Sometime between the 1920s and the 1950s, human remains
representing one individual (catalog number DU 6054) were recovered
near Greeley, Weld County, CO, by F.B. Dunn. The remains were
transferred to Dr. E.B. Renaud, founder of the University of Denver
Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, sometime during
that period. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    The only information available for these remains is a note in the
museum records that describe the remains as an ``Historic Indian
Skull.'' This suggests that the remains may have been found with
artifacts or other indications that postdate the introduction of
European-derived trade goods in the 1600s.
    In 1931, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from site CO E:2:1 (5WL59) on the Prosser Ranch, formerly known as the
Ketcham Ranch, Weld County, CO, by Dr. E.B. Renaud, of the University
of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology. No
known individual was identified. The 10 associated funerary objects are
6 chipped stone flakes, 1 worked animal bone, 1 ground stone object,
and 2 Dismal River ceramic sherds.
    The Dismal River aspect, circa A.D. 1650-1725, is an early contact-
period cultural development on the central plains characterized by
distinctive ceramics, multifamily houses, and an economy based on
horticulture and hunting. Many archeologists have identified the Dismal
River people as ancestral to the Plains Apache tribes, based on
interpretations of the material culture, ethnohistoric record, and
geography. Oral historical information presented during the
consultations indicates a broader cultural affiliation with the tribes
of the central plains.
    In 1934, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from site CO E:8:4 (5WL177), Weld County, CO, by Dr. E.B. Renaud, of
the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of
Anthropology, and his assistant, Wayne Kraxberger. No known individuals
were identified. The 54 associated funerary objects are 51 chipped
stone flakes, 1 scraper, 1 shell, and 1 nonhuman bone.
    Site CO E:8:4 is a camp, burial, and hunting blind site. No
additional information on the age or context of the site is available.
There are no additional artifacts from this site in the University of
Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology.
    In 1965, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from the Spring site, CO K:12:3 (5DA120), Douglas County, CO, by Dr.
A.P. Olson, a member of the University of Denver Department of
Anthropology. No known individual was identified. The 54 associated
funerary objects are 3 cord-marked ceramic sherds, 34 chipped stone
flakes, and 17 nonhuman bone fragments.
    The Spring site has multiple occupations beginning in the
Paleoindian or Archaic periods and extending to the Plains Woodland
period (A.D. 400-1000). The presence of the cord-marked ceramics in
association with these remains indicates that they date no earlier than
the Plains Woodland period, when pottery first appeared in eastern
Colorado.
    In 1954, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from site CO L:11:20 (5EL66), Elbert County, CO, during an
archeological project led by Dr. Arnold Withers, a University of Denver
Department of Anthropology faculty member. No known individual was
identified. The 50 associated funerary objects are 16 chipped stone
flakes, 2 projectile points, 9 rocks, 2 ground stone fragments, 2 shell
fragments, and 19 sherds, including cord-marked and stamped sherds.

[[Page 18655]]

    Site CO L:11:20 (5EL66) is a hilltop camp and burial site located
in the West Bijou Valley. The ceramics indicate that the site was
occupied after A.D. 400, when ceramics were first introduced to the
area, and is possibly a Plains Woodland period (A.D. 400-1000) site.
    Sometime between the 1920s and the 1950s, human remains
representing one individual (catalog number DU 6055) were recovered
from Hugo, Lincoln County, CO, by F. Hines. The remains were
transferred to Dr. E.B. Renaud, of the University of Denver Department
of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, sometime during that
period. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    The only information available for these remains is a note in the
museum records that describes the remains as an ``Historic Indian
Skull.'' This suggests that the remains may have been found with
artifacts or other indications that postdate the introduction of
European-derived trade goods in the 1600s.
    In 1955, cultural objects associated with human remains were
recovered from site CO T:3:10 (5LN32), Jod Ranch, Lincoln County, CO,
by Dr. Arnold Withers, of the University of Denver Department of
Anthropology, Willena D. Cartwright, and Maurice Frink, executive
director of the Colorado Historical Society. The human remains
(Colorado Historical Society catalog number 0.7364.1) and some of the
associated funerary objects are presently held by the Colorado
Historical Society. The University of Denver Department of Anthropology
and Museum of Anthropology holds 61 associated funerary objects. The 61
associated funerary objects are 26 sherds; 10 bone beads; 5 projectile
point fragments, 1 of which is Paleoindian; 5 metate fragments; 2
manos; 1 bone tool; 2 stone knifes; 4 scrapers; 1 coprolite; 1 chert
core; 1 chopper; 1 utilized flake; and 2 stone flakes.
    Site CO T:3:10 was described as a ``burial pit blowout,''
containing the remains of at least four individuals. The sherds from
the burials have not been identified but probably date to a period
later than the Plains Woodland (A.D. 400-1000). A post-Woodland date,
combined with the absence of any European-derived trade goods, suggests
that these burials dated to the period of approximately A.D. 1000-1700.
The information available for the burials does not indicate the
original context of the Paleoindian point, and the burials are
associated with much later artifacts that indicate that they do not
date to the Paleoindian period (circa 10000-6000 B.C.).
    In 1989, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from the Herrell site, CO T:5:1, near Pumpkin Corners, Lincoln County,
CO, by a group of amateur archeologists under the supervision of Jim
Herrell, a University of Denver alumnus. Mr. Herrell apparently gave
the materials to Dr. Sarah Nelson, a professor in the University of
Denver Department of Anthropology, for transmittal to the museum. No
known individuals were identified. The 38 associated funerary objects
are 3 marked ceramic sherds and 35 Native American clay pipe fragments.
    The exact date of the occupation of the Herrell site has not been
determined. The presence of the ceramics in association with these
remains indicates that they date no earlier than the Plains Woodland
period (A.D. 400-1000), when pottery first appeared in eastern
Colorado.
    In 1930, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from site CO U:16:1 (5PW20), near Granada, Prowers County, CO, by Dr.
E.B. Renaud, of the University of Denver Department of Anthropology,
and his assistant, Charlie Steen. No known individual was identified.
The 10 associated funerary objects are 7 chipped stone flakes, 2 ground
stone artifacts, and 1 marked ceramic sherd.
    The exact date of the occupation of site CO U:16:1 has not been
determined. The presence of the ceramics in association with these
remains indicates that they date no earlier than the Plains Woodland
period (A.D. 400-1000), when pottery first appeared in eastern
Colorado.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
recovered from site CO BB:10:3, Baca County, CO, by an unknown
individual. There is no information on how the museum acquired these
remains. No known individual was identified. The 15 associated funerary
objects are 14 ceramic sherds, 1 of which is tube-shaped, and 1 chipped
stone flake.
    The exact date of the occupation of site CO BB:10:3 has not been
determined. The presence of the ceramics in association with these
remains indicates that they date no earlier than the Plains Woodland
period (A.D. 400-1000), when pottery first appeared in eastern
Colorado.
    Unless specifically stated above, collections documentation is
limited concerning possible dates, cultural affiliation(s), or the
circumstances under which the Native American human remains and
associated funerary objects described above were found. Colorado's
history of tribal relocation, however, suggests that all of the human
remains and associated funerary objects described above date prior to
contact with Europeans. The ``Indian Land Areas Judicially Established
1978 Map'' indicates the legal claim to land based upon traditional use
for the Cheyenne and Arapaho. The ``Early Indian Tribes, Culture Areas,
and Linguistic Stocks Map'' establishes the presence of Arapaho,
Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, and Jicarilla Apache at the time of contact
with Europeans. The Colorado Office of Archaeology and Historic
Preservation map of Native American distribution in Colorado
establishes the presence of the Pawnee, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche,
Kiowa, Apache, and Kiowa-Apache. Representatives from five Sioux tribes
presented oral testimony during consultation that placed the Sioux in
Colorado back to at least the Plains Woodland period. The five Sioux
tribes are the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River
Reservation, South Dakota; the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge
Reservation, South Dakota; the Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud
Indian Reservation, South Dakota; the Santee Sioux Tribe of the Santee
Reservation of Nebraska; and the Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota.
Based on the totality of the circumstances surrounding the acquisition
of these human remains and associated funerary objects, the evidence of
traditional territories, oral traditions, archeological context, and
material culture, officials of the University of Denver Department of
Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology have determined that there is
cultural affiliation with the present-day Indian tribes who claim a
presence in the region prior to and during the contact period.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the
University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of
Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the
human remains described above represent the physical remains of 11
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the University of
Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology also have
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the 289 objects
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of
the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the University of
Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology have
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR

[[Page 18656]]

10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and
associated funerary objects and the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; the
Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; the Assiniboine
and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana; the
Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of
the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; the Comanche Indian
Tribe, Oklahoma; the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow Creek
Reservation, South Dakota; the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe of South
Dakota; the Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; the Jicarilla Apache
Tribe of the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico; the Kiowa
Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe of the Lower
Brule Reservation, South Dakota; the Lower Sioux Indian Community of
Minnesota Mdewakanton Sioux Indians of the Lower Sioux; the Northern
Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana;
the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota; the
Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; the Prairie Island Indian Community of
Minnesota Mdewakanton Sioux Indians of the Prairie Island Reservation,
Minnesota; the Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation,
South Dakota; the Santee Sioux Tribe of the Santee Reservation of
Nebraska; the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community of Minnesota (Prior
Lake); the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe of the Lake Traverse
Reservation, South Dakota; the Spirit Lake Tribe, North Dakota
(formerly known as the Devils Lake Sioux Tribe); the Standing Rock
Sioux Tribe of North and South Dakota; the Upper Sioux Indian Community
of the Upper Sioux Reservation, Minnesota; and the Yankton Sioux Tribe
of South Dakota.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Apache Tribe of
Oklahoma; the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming;
the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation,
Montana; the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; the Cheyenne River
Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; the
Comanche Indian Tribe, Oklahoma; the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow
Creek Reservation, South Dakota; the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe of
South Dakota; the Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; the Jicarilla
Apache Tribe of the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico;
the Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe of the
Lower Brule Reservation, South Dakota; the Lower Sioux Indian Community
of Minnesota Mdewakanton Sioux Indians of the Lower Sioux; the Northern
Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana;
the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota; the
Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; the Prairie Island Indian Community of
Minnesota Mdewakanton Sioux Indians of the Prairie Island Reservation,
Minnesota; the Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation,
South Dakota; the Santee Sioux Tribe of the Santee Reservation of
Nebraska; the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community of Minnesota (Prior
Lake); the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe of the Lake Traverse
Reservation, South Dakota; the Skull Valley Band of Goshute Indians of
Utah; the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation,
Colorado; the Spirit Lake Tribe, North Dakota (formerly known as the
Devils Lake Sioux Tribe); the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North and
South Dakota; the Upper Sioux Indian Community of the Upper Sioux
Reservation, Minnesota;
the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation, Utah; the Ute
Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico
and Utah; and the Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota. Representatives
of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally
affiliated with these human remains and associated funerary objects
should contact Jan I. Bernstein, Collections Manager and NAGPRA
Coordinator, University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum
of Anthropology, 2000 Asbury, Sturm Hall S-146, Denver, CO 80208-2406,
e-mail jbernste@du.edu, telephone (303) 871-2543, before May 10, 2001.
Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to
the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River
Reservation, Wyoming; the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck
Indian Reservation, Montana; the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma;
the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South
Dakota; the Comanche Indian Tribe, Oklahoma; the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe
of the Crow Creek Reservation, South Dakota; the Flandreau Santee Sioux
Tribe of South Dakota; the Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; the
Jicarilla Apache Tribe of the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New
Mexico; the Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe
of the Lower Brule Reservation, South Dakota; the Lower Sioux Indian
Community of Minnesota Mdewakanton Sioux Indians of the Lower Sioux;
the Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian
Reservation, Montana; the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge
Reservation, South Dakota; the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; the Prairie
Island Indian Community of Minnesota Mdewakanton Sioux Indians of the
Prairie Island Reservation, Minnesota;
the Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South
Dakota; the Santee Sioux Tribe of the Santee Reservation of Nebraska;
the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community of Minnesota (Prior Lake); the
Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe of the Lake Traverse Reservation, South
Dakota; the Spirit Lake Tribe, North Dakota (formerly known as the
Devils Lake Sioux Tribe); the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North and
South Dakota; the Upper Sioux Indian Community of the Upper Sioux
Reservation, Minnesota; and the Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota may
begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: March 20, 2001.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 01-8700 Filed 4-9-01; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F
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