[Federal Register: August 16, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 159)]
[Notices]
[Page 49998-50000]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr16au00-84]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the
Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections Facility,
Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Anthropological Studies
Center (ASC), Archaeological Collections Facility (ACF), Sonoma State
University, Rohnert Park, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible

[[Page 49999]]

for the determinations within this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by ASC
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Elem
Indian Colony of Pomo Indians of the Sulphur Bank Rancheria,
California; the Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California; and
the Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians of California.
    In 1973, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals
were removed from the Garner Island site (CA-LAK-28) during
unauthorized excavations and donated to the ACF by Don Branscomb, an
amateur archeologist. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of 23 individuals
were removed from the Garner Island site (CA-LAK-28) during
unauthorized excavations and donated to the ACF by Don Branscomb, an
amateur archeologist. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological records, these human remains have been
identified as Native American from the pre-contact period. Based on
surface evidence, the Garner Island site (CA-LAK-28) has been
identified as a habitation site occupied during pre-contact times.
    In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals
were removed from the Slater Island site (CA-LAK-30) during
unauthorized excavations and donated to the ACF by Don Branscomb, an
amateur archeologist. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological records, these human remains have been
identified as Native American from the pre-contact period. Based on
surface evidence, the Slater Island site (CA-LAK-30) has been
identified as a habitation site occupied during pre-contact times.
    In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals
were removed from site CA-LAK-159 during unauthorized excavations and
donated to the ACF by Don Branscomb, an amateur archeologist. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Based on archeological records, these human remains have been
identified as Native American from the pre-contact period.
    In 1973 and 1974, human remains representing a minimum of 34
individuals were excavated from the Mostin site (CA-LAK-380/1) by
professional staff of Sonoma State University and Cabrillo College in
response to an eroding creek bank. No known individuals were
identified. The 58 associated funerary objects include perforated stone
tablets, bone tools, obsidian and chert projectile points, groundstone,
and various bone and lithic debitage.
    In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of 20 individuals
were removed from the Mostin site (CA-LAK-380/1) during unauthorized
excavations and donated to the ACF by Don Branscomb, an amateur
archeologist. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    Based on obsidian hydration data and diagnostic material culture,
the Mostin site has been identified as a habitation site occupied
between 4000-1000 B.C.
    In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of one individual
were recovered from site CA-LAK-384 during a surface collection
conducted by John Parker. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological records, this individual has been identified
as Native American from the pre-contact period.
    In 1975, human remains representing a minimum of nine individuals
were recovered from the Cole Creek site (CA-LAK-425) during salvage
excavations conducted by Ron King and Dr. David A. Fredrickson when
road construction exposed human remains within Clear Lake State Park.
No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary
object is a pestle.
    Based on artifact analysis, the Cole Creek site has been identified
as a Native American habitation site occupied between 3000 B.C.-A.D.
500.
    In 1981, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals
were recovered from the Creager site (CA-LAK-510) during an auguring
test by Lowell Damon of the ASC for the Pacific Telephone Company. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    In 1982, human remains representing a minimum of six individuals
were recovered from the Creager site (CA-LAK-510) during a field school
conducted by James A. Bennyhoff of Sonoma State University. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    In 1982, human remains representing a minimum of one individual
were recovered from the Creager site (CA-LAK-510) during a field school
excavation sponsored by the Santa Rosa Junior College. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1986, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals
were recovered from the Creager site (CA-LAK-510) by the ASC during
mitigation for a sewer line that borders the site. No known individuals
were identified. The 814 associated funerary objects include projectile
points, shell beads, historic-era nails, buttons, and other clothing
fasteners.
    Based on artifact analysis, the Creager site has been identified as
a habitation site occupied between 10000 B.C.-A.D.1900. No carbon dates
have been taken from this site, and therefore the estimated age of
these human remains is unknown. Based on the associated funerary
objects from the 1986 excavations, an historic date for these burials
is most likely.
    In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of one individual
were recovered from the Mud Flat site (CA-LAK-528) during unauthorized
excavations and donated to the ACF by Don Branscomb, an amateur
archeologist. No known individual was identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological records, these human remains have been dated
to pre-contact times. Based on surface evidence, the Mud Flat site has
been identified as a habitation site occupied during pre-contact times.
    In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of one individual
were recovered from site CA-LAK-679 during unauthorized excavations and
donated to ACF by Don Branscomb, an amateur archeologist. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological records, these human remains have been dated
to pre-contact times.
    In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals
were recovered from an unknown site in the Upper Lake area of Lake
County, CA during unauthorized excavations and donated to ACF by Don
Branscomb, an amateur archeologist. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on excavation notes, these individuals have been identified
as Native American from the pre-contact period.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the
Anthropological Studies Center, Sonoma State University have determined
that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above
represent the physical remains of a minimum of 113 individuals of
Native American ancestry. Officials of the Anthropological Studies
Center,

[[Page 50000]]

Sonoma State University also have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR
10.2 (d)(2), the 873 objects listed above are reasonably believed to
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials
of the Anthropological Studies Center, Sonoma State University have
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship
of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between these
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the
Elem Indian Colony of Pomo Indians of the Sulphur Bank Rancheria,
California; the Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California; and
the Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians of California. This notice has
been sent to officials of the Elem Indian Colony of Pomo Indians of the
Sulphur Bank Rancheria, California; the Middletown Rancheria of Pomo
Indians of California; and the Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians of
California. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes
itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains and
associated funerary objects should contact Sarah E. Blanchfield, NAGPRA
Project Manager, Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological
Collections Facility, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA 95472,
telephone (707) 664-2381, before September 15, 2000. Repatriation of
the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Elem Indian
Colony of Pomo Indians of the Sulphur Bank Rancheria, California; the
Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California; and the Scotts
Valley Band of Pomo Indians of California may begin after that date if
no additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: August 9, 2000.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 00-20824 Filed 8-15-00; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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