[Federal Register: March 12, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 48)]
[Notices]
[Page 12349-12351]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr12mr99-81]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Kansas State
Historical Society, Topeka, KS

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Kansas State Historical
Society, Topeka, KS.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Kansas State
Historical Society (KSHS) professional staff in consultation with
representatives of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes.
    In 1959, human remains representing one individual were excavated
from the Anthony site (14HP1, or Dow Mandeville site), Harper County,
KS by University of Kansas archeologist James Chism. At some time
during the 1960s, these human remains were transferred from the
University of Kansas to KSHS. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from the Anthony site (14HP1, or Dow Mandeville site), Harper
County, KS reportedly following their exposure during road construction
by Sydney Large, who donated the human remains to KSHS in 1988. No
known individual was identified. The seven associated funerary objects
are pottery sherds.
    Based on the estimated age of the human remains; and their
osteological identification as Mongoloid, both individuals have been
identified as Native American. Based on material culture and geographic
location, the Anthony site has been identified as a Bluff Creek complex
occupation dating from c. 1020 A.D. Based on temporal position,
geographic location, and the general character of material culture, the
Bluff Creek complex has been identified as possibly being ancestral to
the Wichita tribe.
    In 1969, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from site 14BA401, Barber County, KS during excavations conducted by
KSHS archeologists. No known individual was identified. The eight
associated funerary objects include ceramics, a catlinite pipe
fragment, bison bone, turtle shell, and a mollusc shell.
    Based on the archeological context and associated funerary objects,
this individual has been identified as Native American. Based on
material culture, site 14BA401 has been identified as a Pratt Complex
occupation dating to the late precontact period. Based on temporal
position; geographic location; and the general character of material
culture, particularly the use of grass houses, the Pratt Complex has
been identified as possibly being ancestral to the Wichita tribe.
    In 1967, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from site 14HP5 in Harper County, KS by KSHS archeologists following
the exposure of the remains due to roadwork. No known individuals were
identified. The 37 associated funerary objects include shell disc beads
and one piece of ocher.
    Based on archeological context, burial location, and associated
funerary objects, these individuals have been identified as Native
American. Based on

[[Page 12350]]

material culture, site 14HP5 has been identified as a Bluff Creek
Complex occupation dating from ca. 1020 A.D. Based on temporal
position, geographic location, and the general character of material
culture, the Bluff Creek Complex has been identified as possibly being
ancestral to the Wichita tribe.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual from
the Saxman site (14RC301), Rice County, KS were donated to KSHS by
Ralph Thode, who reportedly removed the remains from the site's
surface. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    Based on the reported association of these remains with the Saxman
site, this individual has been identified as Native American. Based on
material culture, the Saxman site has been identified as a village
occupation of the Little River Focus of the Great Bend Aspect (1400-
1600 A.D). Based on temporal position, geographic location, material
culture, radiocarbon dates, and historic documents originating with the
Coronado expedition of 1541, the Little River Focus is considered to be
a proto-historic manifestation of the present-day Wichita tribe.
    In 1934, human remains representing one individual from the Paint
Creek site (14MP1) were excavated by Nebraska State Historical Society
personnel. In 1987, these human remains were transferred from the
Nebraska State Historical Society to the KSHS. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on the archeological context of the human remains, this
individual has been identified as Native American. Based on material
culture, the Paint Creek site has been identified as a village
occupation of the Little River Focus of the Great Bend Aspect (1400-
1600 A.D.). Based on temporal position, geographic location, material
culture, radiocarbon dates, and historic documents originating with the
Coronado expedition of 1541, the Little River Focus is considered to be
a proto-historic manisfestation of the present-day Wichita tribe.
    In 1995, human remains representing two individuals from the
Country Club site (14CO3), Cowley County, KS were recovered during
legally authorized excavations conducted by KSHS archeologists. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were
present.
    Based on archeological context, these individuals have been
identified as Native American. Based on material culture, the Country
Club site has been identified as a village occupation of the Lower
Walnut Focus of the Great Bend Aspect (1400-1700 A.D.). Based on
temporal position, geographic location, material culture, radiocarbon
dates, and historic documents originating with the Onate expedition of
1601, the Lower Walnut Focus is considered to be a proto-historic
manifestation of the present-day Wichita tribe.
    In 1995, human remains representing two individuals from site
14CO331, Cowley County, KS were recovered during legally authorized
excavations conducted by KSHS archeologists. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    Based on archeological context, these individuals have been
identified as Native American. Based on material culture and
radiocarbon dates, site 14CO331 has been identified as a village
occupation of the Lower Walnut Focus of the Great Bend Aspect (1400-
1700 A.D.). Based on temporal position, geographic location, material
culture, radiocarbon dates, and historic documents originating with the
Onate expedition of 1601, the Great Bend Aspect culture is considered
to be a proto-historic manifestation of the present-day Wichita tribe.
    In 1995, human remains representing one individual from site
14CO1509, Cowley County, KS were recovered during legally authorized
excavations conducted by KSHS archeologists. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    Based on archeological context, this individual has been identified
as Native American. Based on material culture and radiocarbon dates,
sit 14CO1509 has been identified as a village occupation of the Lower
Walnut Focus of the Great Bend Aspect (1400-1700 A.D.). Based on
temporal position, geographic location, material culture, radiocarbon
dates, and historic documents originating with the Onate expedition of
1601, the Great Bend Aspect culture is considered to be a proto-
historic manifestation of the present-day Wichita tribe.
    In 1995, human remains representing five individuals from site
14CO385, Cowley County, KS were recovered during legally authorized
excavations conducted by KSHS archeologists. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    Based on archeological context, these individuals have been
identified as Native American. Due to the extremely fragmented nature
of the human remains from this site, the minimum number of individuals
was based on one individual per each storage pit for this village.
Based on material culture and radiocarbon dates, site 14CO385 has been
identified as a village occupation of the Lower Walnut Focus of the
Great Bend Aspect (1400-1700 A.D.). Based on temporal position,
geographic location, material culture, radiocarbon dates, and historic
documents originating with the Onate expedition of 1601, the Great Bend
Aspect culture is considered to be a proto-historic manifestation of
the present-day Wichita tribe.
    In 1994, human remains representing two individuals from site
14CO501 were recovered during legally authorized excavations conducted
by KSHS archeologists. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects were present.
    Based on archeological context, these individuals have been
identified as Native American. Based on material culture and
radiocarbon dates, site 14CO501 has been identified as a village
occupation of the Lower Walnut Focus of the Great Bend Aspect (1400-
1700 A.D.). Based on temporal position, geographic location, material
culture, radiocarbon dates, and historic documents originating with the
Onate expedition of 1601, the Great Bend Aspect culture is considered
to be a proto-historic manifestation of the present-day Wichita tribe.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the Kansas
State Historical Society have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains
of 19 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Kansas
State Historical Society have also determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR
10.2 (d)(2), the 52 objects listed above are reasonably believed to
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials
of the Kansas State Historical Society have determined that, pursuant
to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity
which can be reasonably traced between these Native American human
remains and associated funerary objects and the Wichita and Affiliated
Tribes.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Wichita and
Affiliated Tribes. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that
believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains
and associated funerary objects should contact Randall Thies,
Archeologist, Kansas State Historical Society, 6425 SW Sixth Avenue,
Topeka, KS 66606-1099; telephone: (913) 272-8681, ext. 267, before
April 12, 1999. Repatriation of the human remains and associated

[[Page 12351]]

funerary objects to the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes may begin after
that date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: March 1, 1999.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 99-6110 Filed 3-11-99; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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