[Federal Register: November 25, 1998 (Volume 63, Number 227)]
[Notices]
[Page 65218-65219]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr25no98-127]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects from Bernalillo, Cibola, and Socorro
Counties, NM in the Control of the Cibola National Forest, United
States Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects from Bernalillo, Cibola, and Socorro Counties, NM in
the control of the Cibola National Forest, United States Forest
Service, Albuquerque, NM.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Maxwell
Museum (University of New Mexico), the Museum of New Mexico, Northern
Arizona University, and U.S. Forest Service professional staff in
consultation with representatives of the Pueblo of Acoma, the Hopi
Tribe, the Pueblo of Isleta, the Pueblo of Sandia, and the Pueblo of
Zuni.
    Between 1977 and 1979, human remains representing 28 individuals
were recovered from sites NA 21566, NA 23177, and NA 23178 during
legally authorized excavations conducted by J. Richard Ambler of
Northern Arizona University. No known individuals were identified. The
11 associated funerary objects include ceramic vessels, sherds, and
chipped stone.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization,
sites NA 21566, NA 23177, and NA 23178 have been identified as small
Anasazi pueblos occupied between 800-1150 A.D. Continuities of
ethnographic materials, technology, and architecture indicate
affiliation of Anasazi sites in

[[Page 65219]]

west-central New Mexico with historic and present-day Puebloan
cultures. Oral traditions presented by representatives of the Pueblo of
Acoma, the Hopi Tribe, and the Pueblo of Zuni support cultural
affiliation with Anasazi sites in west-central New Mexico.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the USDA
Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1),
the human remains listed above represent the physical remains of 28
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the USDA Forest
Service have also determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the
11 objects listed above are reasonably believed to have been placed
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as
part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the USDA
Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there
is a relationship of shared group identity which can be reasonably
traced between these Native American human remains and associated
funerary objects and the Pueblo of Acoma, the Hopi Tribe, and the
Pueblo of Zuni.
    Between 1948 and 1976, human remains representing 124 individuals
were recovered from Tijeras Pueblo (LA 581) during legally authorized
excavations and collections conducted by the University of New Mexico
Archeological Field School, the Museum of New Mexico, and the Cibola
National Forest. These human remains are currently curated at the
Maxwell Museum of Anthropology (University of New Mexico) and the
Museum of New Mexico. No known individuals were identified. The
approximately 360 associated funerary objects include ceramic vessels,
sherds, stone tools and jewelry, bone tools, botanical samples, corn
cobs, and projectile points.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization,
Tijeras Pueblo has been identified as a large masonry pueblo occupied
between 1300-1600 A.D.
    Between 1974 and 1977, human remains representing 33 individuals
were recovered from Gallinas Springs Ruin (LA 1178 and LA 1180) during
legally authorized excavations and collections conducted by the Western
Michigan University Archeological Field School and the University of
New Mexico Archeological Field School. These human remains are
currently curated at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology (University of
New Mexico). No known individuals were identified. The approximately 20
associated funerary objects include ceramic vessels, sherds, stone
tools, groundstone, and shell beads.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization,
Gallinas Springs Ruin has been identified as a large masonry pueblo
occupied between 1300-1600 A.D.
    Between 1982 and 1983, human remains representing four individuals
were recovered from Two Dead Juniper Village (LA 87432) during legally
authorized excavations and collections by the Center for
Anthropological Studies. These human remains are currently curated at
the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology (Univerity of New Mexico). No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were
present.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization, Two
Dead Juniper Village has been identified as an Anasazi pithouse village
occupied between 1150-1250 A.D.
    In 1987, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from the Bear Canyon site (LA 61032) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by University of New Mexico personnel. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization, the
Bear Canyon site has been identified as a small Anasazi pueblo occupied
between 1200-1600 A.D.
    Continuities of ethnographic materials, technology, and
architecture indicate affiliation of Anasazi sites in portions of
central New Mexico with historic and present-day Puebloan cultures.
Oral traditions presented by representatives of the Pueblo of Isleta
and the Pueblo of Sandia support cultural affiliation with Anasazi
sites in the portions of central New Mexico where the preceeding sites
are located.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the USDA
Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1),
the human remains listed above represent the physical remains of 162
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the USDA Forest
Service have also determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the
minimum of 380 objects listed above are reasonably believed to have
been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death
or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of
the USDA Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(e), there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and
associated funerary objects and the Pueblo of Isleta, the Pueblo of
Sandia, and Ysleta del Sur Pueblo.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Pueblo of Acoma, the
Hopi Tribe, the Pueblo of Zuni, the Pueblo of Isleta, the Pueblo of
Sandia, and Ysleta del Sur Pueblo. Representatives of any other Indian
tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human
remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Frank E.
Wozniak, NAGPRA Coordinator, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service,
517 Gold Ave., SW, Albuquerque, NM 87102; telephone: (505) 842-3238,
fax (505) 842-3800, before December 28, 1998. Repatriation of the human
remains and associated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe, the Pueblo
of Acoma, the Pueblo of Isleta, the Pueblo of Sandia, the Pueblo of
Zuni, and Ysleta del Sur Pueblo may begin after that date if no
additional claimants come forward.
Dated: November 18, 1998.
Veletta Canouts,
Acting Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Deputy Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 98-31483 Filed 11-24-98; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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