[Federal Register: August 14, 1998 (Volume 63, Number 157)]
[Notices]
[Page 43722]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr14au98-105]

[[Page 43722]]

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
from Plymouth, MA and an Associated Funerary Object from Barnstable, MA
in the Possession of Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains from Plymouth, MA in
the possession of Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth, MA.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Pilgrim Hall
Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the
Wampanoag Repatriation Confederation on behalf of the Wampanoag Tribe
of Gay Head (Aquinnah).
    In 1861, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from Cummaquid, Barnstable, MA by Amos Otis while plowing a field. No
known individual was identified. The associated funerary objects
include a copper kettle, a canister of metal fragments and nails, and
other grave goods.
    Although these human remains had been believed to be those of
Sachem Iyannough, examination of the remains indicated they were
actually of a young woman. In 1974, this individual and most of the
associated funerary objects were repatriated to Frank James
(Wampanoag). This remaining container of metal fragments and nails
which is clearly associated with the burial, was accidentally
overlooked at that time and recently found during inventorying the
collections. Based on the associated funerary objects, this burial has
been determined to be from the historic period. Several 17th-century
colonial sources indicate the presence of Wampanoag people in the
Barnstable area during the early contact period.
    The associated funerary object listed above constitutes a newly-
found item from a previously repatriated collection. Because the
previously repatriated collection was returned prior to the enactment
of NAGPRA, this item is being published to document the return of an
associated funerary object as part of an action on a repatriation
request pending on the date of NAGPRA's enactment.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of Pilgrim Hall
Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the one
object listed above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of
the death rite or ceremony. Officials of Pilgrim Hall Museum have also
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3009 (2), this object is part of
an action on a repatriation request pending on the date of enactment of
NAGPRA and will therefore be repatriated to the Wampanoag Repatriation
Confederation on behalf of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah).
    In 1884, human remains representing one individual were recovered
by Mr. Paulding from Watson's Hill in Plymouth, MA during house
construction. In 1962, these human remains, consisting of hair
fragments, were donated to Pilgrim Hall Museum by Eunice Paulding
Bassett. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    In 1884, human remains representing one individual were recovered
by Dr. Edward B. Stephens from Watson's Hill in Plymouth, MA during
house construction. At some time after 1884, Dr. Stephens donated a
large Native collection to Pilgrim Hall Museum which contained the
human remains, consisting of hair fragments. Documents note that during
the house construction, Dr. Stephens recovered a skeleton, some hair,
and a stone tablet. The location of the skeleton and stone tablet is
unknown. No associated funerary objects are present in the collections
of Pilgrim Hall Museum.
    Based on historical documents, Watson's Hill in Plymouth, MA is a
known settlement of the Patuxet Wampanoag who lived in the Plymouth
area prior to the arrival of Europeans on the Mayflower and other
ships. Early historic documents list the Native place name as
Cantaugheantiest, a Wampanoag term meaning ``planted fields.'' Based on
the discovery of many human remains in this area, Watson's Hill is
likely to have been a Patuxet Wampanoag burial ground in the late pre-
contact and early historic periods.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of Pilgrim Hall
Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human
remains listed above represent the physical remains of two individuals
of Native American ancestry. Officials of Pilgrim Hall Museum have also
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship
of shared group identity which can be reasonably traced between these
Native American human remains and the Wampanoag Repatriation
Confederation on behalf of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah).
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Wampanoag
Repatriation Confederation on behalf of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head
(Aquinnah). Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes
itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains should
contact Karin J. Goldstein Curator, Pilgrim Hall Museum, 75 Court
Street, Plymouth, MA 02360; telephone (508) 746-1620, ext. 4, before
September 14, 1998. Repatriation of the human remains to the Wampanoag
Repatriation Confederation on behalf of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head
(Aquinnah) may begin after that date if no additional claimants come
forward.
Dated: August 4, 1998.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 98-21834 Filed 8-13-98; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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