[Federal Register: July 22, 1998 (Volume 63, Number 140)]
[Notices]
[Page 39293-39294]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr22jy98-74]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
in the Control of the Gila National Forest, USDA Forest Service, Silver
City, NM

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of
the Gila National Forest, USDA Forest Service, Silver City, NM.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Arizona
State Museum, Field Museum, Logan Museum, Maxwell Museum (University of
New Mexico), Museum of New Mexico, Ohio Historical Society, Peabody
Museum (Harvard University), University of Texas at Austin, and Western
New Mexico University Museum professional staffs and USDA Forest
Service professional staff in consultation with representatives of the
Hopi Tribe, the Pueblo of Acoma, and the Pueblo of Zuni.
    In 1935 and 1936, human remains representing 19 individuals were
recovered from Starkweather Ruin within the Gila National Forest during
legally authorized excavations by Paul H. Nesbitt of Beloit College,
Beloit, WI. These human remains are presently curated at the Logan
Museum at Beloit College. No known individuals were identified. The 45
associated funerary objects include ceramic vessels and sherds, shell
and stone jewelry, and a projectile point.
    Based on materical culture, architecture, and site organization,
the Starkweather Ruin has been identified as an Upland Mogollon
pithouse village and pueblo occupied between 500-1000 A.D. and 1100-
1300 A.D.
    Between 1935-1955, human remains representing 51 individuals were
recovered from SU site, Oak Springs Pueblo, Tularosa Cave, Apache Creek
Pueblo, Turkey Foot Ridge Stie, Wet Leggett Peublo, Three Pines Pueblo,
South Leggett Pueblo, and Brown site by Dr. Paul Martin of the Field
Museum, Chicago, IL. These human remains are currently curated at the
Field Museum, Chicago, IL. No known individuals were identified. The
115 associated funerary objects include ceramic vessels and sherds,
stone and shell jewelry, stone and bone tools, and projectile points.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization, the
nine sites listed in the preceding paragraph have been identified as an
Upland Mogollon cave, pithouse villages, and pueblos occupied between
300-1300 A.D.
    In 1955, human remains representing 19 individuals were recovered
from Apache Creek Pueblo (LA 2949) during legally authorized
excavations and collections conducted by Stewart Peckham of the Museum
of New Mexico as part of a New Mexico Highway's Department project.
These human remains are currently curated at the Museum of New Mexico.
No known individuals were identified. The 32 associated funerary
objects include ceramic vessels, and shell and stone jewelry.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization,
Apache Creek Pueblo (LA 2949) has been idetnfied as an Upland Mogollon
masonry pueblo with pithouses occupied between 1150-1300 A.D.
    In 1987 and 1988, human remains representing three individuals were
recovered from the SU site (LA 64931) and the Brown site (LA 68924)
during legally authorized excavations conducted by Dr. Chip Wills of
the University of New Mexico as part of a field school. These human
remains are currently curated at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology,
University of New Mexico. No known indviduals were identified. The 12
associated funerary objects include stone tools and animal bone.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization, the
SU site and the Brown site have been

[[Page 39294]]

identified as an Upland Mogollon village and masonry roomblock occupied
between 600 1100 A.D.
    Between 1979-1986, human remains representing one individual were
recovered from the WS Ranch site during legally authorized excavations
and collections conducted by Dr. James A. Neely of the University of
Texas at Austin. These human remains are currently curated at the
University of Texas at Austin. No known individual was identified. The
five associated funerary objects include lithics, sherds, and ceramic
jars. The ceramic jars are curated at Western New Mexico University.
    Based on materical culture, architecture, and site organization,
the WS Ranch site has been identified as an Upland Mogollon masonry
pueblo occupied between 1150 -1300 A.D.
    In 1933, human remains representing three individuals from Mogollon
Village during legally authorized excavations and collections conducted
by Dr. Emil Haury of the Gila Pueblo Foundation. These human remains
are currently curated at the Peabody Museum, Harvard University and the
Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona. No known individuals were
identified. The seven associated funerary objects include beads and a
projectile point fragment.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization,
Mogollon Village has been identified as an Upland Mogollon pithouse
village occupied between 600-1050 A.D.
    Between 1947-1949, human remains representing nine individuals were
recovered from the Jewett Gap site during legally authorized
excavations and collections by the Gila Pueblo Foundation. These human
remains are currently curated by the Arizona State Museum, University
of Arizona. No known individuals were identified. The 26 associated
funerary objects include ceramic vessels.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization, the
Jewett Gap site has been identified as an Upland Mogollon pueblo
occupied between 1000-1150 A.D.
    In 1986, human remains representing one individual from the Eva
Faust site were recovered during legally authorized excavations and
collections conducted by Dr. James Neely, University of Texas-Austin.
These human remains are currently curated at the Western New Mexico
State University Museum. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects were present.
    Based on material culture and site organization, the Eva Faust site
has been identified as a Mogollon pithouse village with surface rooms
occupied between 600-1100 A.D.
    In 1955, human remains representing three individuals were
recovered from sites LA 2947 and LA 2948 during legally authorized
excavations and collections conducted by Edwin N. Ferdon of the Museum
of New Mexico. These human remains are currently curated at the Museum
of New Mexico. No known individuals were identified. The two associated
funerary objects include ceramic vessels.
    Based on material culture and site organization, LA 2947 and LA
2948 have been identified as two Upland Mogollon pithouses occupied
between 200-1000 A.D.
    In 1971 and 1972, human remains representing a minimum of 49
individuals were recovered from sites LA 4987, LA 4988, LA 6082, and LA
6083 during legally authorized excavations and collections conducted by
David W. Kayser of the Museum of New Mexico. These human remains are
currently curated at the Museum of New Mexico. No known individuals
were identified. The 60 associated funerary objects include ceramic
vessels, a stone bowl, and stone tools.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization, LA
4987, LA 4988, LS 6082, and LA 6083 have been identified as Upland
Mogollon pueblos and a pithouse occupied between 1150-1300 A.D.
    In 1973, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals
were removed without a permit from an un-named site northwest of Apache
Creek by Mr. Brad Triplehorn. Mr. Triplehorn then donated these human
remains to the Ohio Historical Society, where they are currently
curated. No known individuals were identified. The 12 associated
funerary objects include ceramic sherds and animal bone.
    Based on material culture, this site has been identified as an
Upland Mogollon site occupied between 600-1300 A.D.
    Continuities of ethnographic materials, technology, and
architecture indicate affiliation of the Upland Mogollon sites listed
above with historic and present-day Puebloan cultures. Oral traditions
presented by representatives of the Hopi Tribe, the Pueblo of Acoma,
and the Pueblo of Zuni support cultural affiliation with these Upland
Mogollon sites in this portion of southwestern New Mexico.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the USDA
Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1),
the human remains listed above represent the physical remains of a
minimum of 162 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of
the USDA Forest Service have also determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR
10.2 (d)(2), the 319 objects listed above are reasonably believed to
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials
of the USDA Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR
10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and
associated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe, the Pueblo of Acoma,
and the Pueblo of Zuni.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the the Hopi Tribe, the
Pueblo of Acoma, and the Pueblo of Zuni. Representatives of any other
Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with
these human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr.
Frank E. Wozniak, NAGPRA Coordinator, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest
Service, 517 Gold Ave., SW, Albuquerque, NM 87102; telephone: (505)
842-3238, fax (505) 842-3800, before August 21, 1998. Repatriation of
the human remains and associated funerary objects to the the Hopi
Tribe, the Pueblo of Acoma, and the Pueblo of Zuni may begin after that
date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: June 16, 1998.
Veletta Canouts,
Acting Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Deputy Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 98-19536 Filed 7-21-98; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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