[Federal Register: October 3, 1997 (Volume 62, Number 192)]
[Notices]
[Page 51898-51903]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr03oc97-106]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Control of the Coconino National
Forest, United States Forest Service, Flagstaff, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C.
3003 (d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains and
associated funerary objects in the control of the Coconino National
Forest, United States Forest Service, Flagstaff, AZ.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by U.S. Forest
Service, Arizona State Museum, Arizona State University, Museum of
Northern Arizona, Northern Arizona University, Peabody Museum of
Archaeology and Ethnology (Harvard University), the Southwest Museum,
and University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professional staff in
consultation with representatives of the Havasupai Tribe, the Hopi
Tribe, the Hualapai Tribe, the Pueblo of Zuni, and the Yavapai-Prescott
Indian Tribe.
    In 1916, human remains representing one individual were removed
without permit from Chavez Pass Ruin, Coconino National Forest by Mrs.
Blanche Dougan, who donated the remains to the Southwest Museum. No
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Prior to 1934, human remains representing four individuals were
removed from Chavez Pass Ruin by George Woodbury and Gila Pueblo staff
and donated in 1934 to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology,
Harvard University. Gila Pueblo was an archeological research facility
located in Globe, AZ. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1967, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals
were recovered from a portion of Chavez Pass Ruin during legally
authorized collections by Dr. John Wilson of the Museum of Northern
Arizona following the disturbance of this portion by pothunters. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    In 1976, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from the surface of Chavez Pass Ruin by Northern Arizona University
staff following vandalism. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Between 1977 and 1981, human remains representing a minimum of
1,930 individuals were recovered from Chavez Pass Ruin during legally
authorized excavations by Dr. Fred Plog of Arizona State University. No
known individuals were identified. The 810 associated funerary objects
include pottery bowls, jars and sherds; shell beads and ornaments;
manos and metates; stone tools; projectile points; fiber matting and
basketry; seeds; charcoal; and animal bones.
    Chavez Pass Ruin has been identified as two large northern Sinagua
masonry pueblos occupied between 1250-1400 A.D. based on ceramic
seriation and radiocarbon dating.
    Between 1940 and 1960, human remains representing three individuals
were recovered from the Pollock site (NA 4317) during legally
authorized excavations conducted by Dr. John C. McGregor of the
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The Pollock site has been identified as a large northern Sinagua
masonry pueblo occupied between 1200-1325 A.D. based on material
culture, architecture, and site organization.
    During 1953-1955, human remains representing seven individuals were
removed from the Pollock site (NA 4317) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by Dr. John McGregor of the University of
Illinois and presently curated at the Museum of Northern Arizona. No
known individuals were identified. The 317 associated funerary objects
include pottery bowls and jars, shell bracelets, turquoise mosaics,
copper bells, shell beads and pendants, yucca fiber, and grinding
stones.
    This portion of the Pollock site has been identified as a northern
Sinagua masonry pueblo occupied between 1325-1400 A.D. based on
material culture, architecture, and site organization.
    In 1940, human remains representing seven individuals were
recovered from Kinikinick Ruin (NA 1629) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by Milton Wetherill of the Museum of Northern
Arizona. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    Between 1940 and 1960, human remains representing two individuals
were recovered from Kinikinick Ruin (NA 1629) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by Dr. John C. McGregor of the University of
Illinois Urbana-Champaign. No known individuals were identified. The
ten associated funerary objects include shell beads.
    Kinikinick Ruin has been identified as two northern Sinagua masonry
pueblos occupied between 1250-1350 A.D. based on material culture,
architecture, and site organization.
    Continuities of ethnographic materials, technology, architecture,
and published oral traditions indicate the affiliation of Chavez Pass
Ruin, Kinikinick Ruin, and the Pollock site with both the Hopi Tribe
and Pueblo of Zuni. Oral traditions presented by representatives of the
Hopi Tribe and Pueblo of Zuni further support this affiliation with the
northern Sinagua sites of Chavez Pass Ruin, Kinikinick Ruin, and the
Pollock site.
    In 1927, human remains representing one individual were purchased
by Gila Pueblo and transferred to the Arizona State Museum in 1950.
Collection information indicates this individual was removed site AR-
03-04-02-1892 without a permit by an unknown person. No known
individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a Sosi
pitcher in which the cremated human remains had been placed.
    Site AR-03-04-02-1892 has been identified as a small Sinagua-period
pueblo occupied between 1006-1300 A.D. based on material culture and
site organization.
    In 1927, human remains representing eight individuals were removed
from Turkey Hills Pueblo during legally authorized excavations by the
Arizona State Museum. No known individuals were identified. The two
associated funerary objects include pottery bowl and jars.
    Turkey Hills Pueblo has been identified as a large two-story pueblo
with a large open court containing small structures. The site appears
to have been occupied during the Sinagua elden-Turkey Hill phase,
between 1100-1225 A.D. based on material culture, site organization,
and architecture.
    In 1980 and 1985, human remains representing six individuals were
recovered from the Townsend Divide Site by University of Arizona staff

[[Page 51899]]

during legally authorized mitigation work on U.S. Highway 89. No known
individuals were identified. The 25 associated funerary objects include
potter jar and bowls, projectile points, stone tools, and shell
jewelry.
    The Townsend Divide Site has been identified as a Sinagua pithouse
village occupied between 1000-1225 A.D. based on material culture,
architecture, and site organization.
    In 1922, human remains representing one individual were donated to
the Southwest Museum by Mr. Elliot B. Loomis. These remains were
apparently removed from a cliff dwelling in Sycamore Canyon without a
permit by Mr. Loomis. No known individual was identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    This cliff dwelling in Sycamore Canyon has been identified as a
Southern Sinagua site occupied between 1100-1400 A.D. based on material
culture, architecture, and site organization.
    During the 1950s, human remains representing nine individuals were
removed from NA 4265 (Page site) during legally authorized excavations
by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals were
identified. The 21 associated funerary objects include pottery bowls
and jars, manos, and shell ornaments.
    During the 1950s, human remains representing a minimum of 37
individuals were removed from NA 4266 (Piper site) during legally
authorized excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known
individuals were identified. The 58 associated funerary object include
pottery jars, bowls, and pitchers; projectile points; stone beads; and
shell jewelry.
    During the 1950s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site NA 5700 during legally authorized excavations by the
Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    During the 1950s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site NA 5899 during legally authorized excavations by the
Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    During the 1950s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site NA 5971 during legally authorized excavations by the
Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    During the 1950s, human remains representing two individuals were
removed from site 6589 during legally authorized excavations by the
Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Site NA 4265 (Page Site), site NA 4266 (Piper Site), site NA 5700,
site NA5899, site NA 5971, and site NA 6589 consist of pithouses, small
masonry pueblos, and an alcove site occupied between 500-1300 A.D. by
people of the Northern Sinagua culture based on material culture,
architecture, and site organization.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site NA 7432 (Rincon Pueblo) during legally authorized
excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was
identified. The four associated funerary objects include pottery bowls.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site NA 8499 (Weimer Ruin) during legally authorized
excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing a minimum of two
individuals were removed from site NA 8507 (Red Bead Pueblo) during
legally authorized excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No
known individuals were identified. The twelve associated funerary
objects include pottery jars and bowls, and projectile points.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing two individuals were
removed from site NA 8722 (Cinder Hill Village) during legally
authorized excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known
individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are a
shell bracelet and pottery canteen.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing four individuals were
removed from site NA 8735 (Cinder Hill Annex) during legally authorized
excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals
were identified. The two associated funerary objects are pottery bowls.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing a minimum of six
individuals were recovered from site NA 8529 during legally authorized
excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals
were identified. The 25 associated funerary objects include pottery
bowls, jars, pitcher and ladle; stone tools, and bone tools.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual were
recovered from site NA 8723 during legally authorized excavations by
the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was identified. The
two associated funerary objects are pottery bowls.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site NA 8781 during legally authorized excavations by the
Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site NA 8787 during legally authorized excavations by the
Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was identified. The two
associated funerary objects are projectile points.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site NA 9091 during legally authorized excavations by the
Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing five individuals were
removed from site NA 9099 during legally authorized excavations by the
Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals were identified. The
two associated funerary objects are turquoise pendants.
    Sites NA 7432, NA 8499, NA 8507, NA 8722, NA 8735, NA 8529, NA
8723, NA 8781, NA 8787, NA 9091, and NA 9099 have been identified as a
group of pueblo and pithouse sites occupied between 1066-1250 A.D.
based on material culture and site organization.
    In 1932, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from the Calkins Ranch site (NA 2385) during legally authorized
excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1957, human remains representing five individuals were recovered
from the Calkins Ranch site (NA 2385) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by Dr. David A. Breternitz of the Museum of
Northern Arizona. No known individuals were identified. The eight
associated funerary objects include pottery bowls and jars, and shell
ornaments.
    The Calkins Ranch site (NA 2385) has been identified as a pithouse
village occupied between 900-1100 A.D. based on material culture and
site organization.
    Between 1966 and 1968, human remains representing three individuals
were recovered from Elden Pueblo (NA 142) during legally authorized

[[Page 51900]]

excavations conducted by Northern Arizona University, and curated by
the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals were identified.
The one associated funerary object is a turquoise bead earring.
    Since 1978, human remains representing fourteen individuals have
been recovered from Elden Pueblo (NA 142) during legally authorized
excavation and stabilization projects by the Coconino National Forest
in partnership with the Museum of Northern Arizona and other
institutions. No known individuals were identified. The 124 associated
funerary objects include pottery mugs, effigies, bowls, jars, and
sherds.
    Elden Pueblo has been identified as northern Sinagua pueblo,
pithouses, and outlier pueblos occupied between 1100-1275 A.D. based on
material culture, radiocarbon dating, architecture, and site
organization.
    In 1974 and 1975, human remains representing a minimum of 145
individuals were recovered from the Koharsho site (NA 10937) during
legally authorized excavations by Dr. William J. Beeson of Sacramento
State College. No known individuals were identified. The 1,575
associated funerary objects include stone beads, pottery bowls, shell
beads, and a shell pendant.
    The Koharsho site (NA 10937) has been identified as a northern
Sinagua masonry pueblo occupied between 1120-1250 A.D. based on
material culture, architecture, and site organization.
    Between 1984 and the summer of 1990, human remains representing 54
individuals were recovered from Lizard Man Village (NA 17957) during
legally authorized excavations by Dr. John Whittaker and Dr. Kathryn
Kamp of Grinnell College. No known individuals were identified. The 26
associated funerary objects include pottery miniatures and sherds;
projectile points; shell bracelet and beads; stone and bone tools.
    Lizard Man Village has been identified as a northern Sinagua
pithouse and surface rooms occupation dating to 1066-1325 A.D. based on
material culture, architecture, and site organization.
    Between 1984 and the summer of 1990, human remains representing two
individuals were recovered from Fortress Hill Pueblo (NA 6612) during
legally authorized excavations by Dr. John Whittaker and Dr. Kathryn
Kamp of Grinnell College. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Fortress Hill Pueblo has been identified as a northern Sinagua
masonry pueblo occupied between 1066-1325 A.D. based on material
culture, architecture, and site organization.
    During 1968-1970, human remains representing eleven individuals
were recovered from site NA 10101 during legally authorized excavations
by Dr. J. Richard Ambler of Northern Arizona University. No known
individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are a
shell bracelet and a corn cob.
    Site NA 10101 has been identified as a northern Sinagua masonry
pueblo occupied between 1100-1225 A.D. based on material culture,
architecture, and site organization.
    In 1957, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from site NA 1125 during legally authorized excavations by Dr. David A
Breternitz of the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site NA 1125 has been identified as a northern Sinagua pithouse
village occupied between 900-1066 A.D. based on material culture and
site organization.
    In 1974, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site NA 11553 during legally authorized excavations by Queens
College, City University, New York, NY and are curated by the Museum of
Northern Arizona. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    Site NA 11553 has been identified as a northern Sinagua masonry
pueblo occupied between 900-1066 A.D. based on material culture,
architecture, and site organization.
    In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals
were recovered from site NA 13259 by the Museum of Northern Arizona
during legally authorized collections following the discovery of
pothunting in areas of the site. No known individuals were identified.
No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site NA 13259 has been identified as a group of northern Sinagua
pithouses based on material culture and site organization.
    In 1958, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from site NA 19055 during legally authorized excavations conducted
jointly by the Museum of Northern Arizona and Northern Arizona
University as a field school supervised by Dr. David Wilcox. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Site NA 19055 has been identified as a northern Sinagua group of
pithouses occupied between 1066-1150 A.D. based on material culture and
site organization.
    During the early 1970s, human remains representing a minimum of
nineteen individuals were recovered from site NA 10772 during legally
authorized data recovery excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona.
No known individuals were identified. The six associated funerary
objects present include pottery bowls, metates, and olivella beads.
    During the early 1970s, human remains representing one individual
were recovered from site NA 10775 during legally authorized data
recovery excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known
individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a
pottery bowl.
    During the early 1970s, human remains representing 81 individuals
were recovered from site NA 10792 during legally authorized data
recovery excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known
individuals were identified. The seven associated funerary objects
present include pottery jar and bowls, and stone tools.
    During the early 1970s, human remains representing 27 individuals
were recovered from site 10794 during legally authorized data recovery
excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    During the early 1970s, human remains representing a minimum of 151
individuals were recovered from site NA 10803 during legally authorized
data recovery excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known
individuals were identified. The 94 associated funerary objects are a
pottery bowls, jars, ladles and pitchers; stone beads and tools; shell
beads and ornaments; and projectile points.
    During the early 1970s, human remains representing a minimum of 196
individuals were recovered from site NA 10806 during legally authorized
data recovery excavations by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known
individuals were identified. The 75 associated funerary objects are a
pottery canteen, bowls, jars, and pitchers; stone beads and tools;
shell beads and ornaments; and projectile points.
    Sites NA 10772, NA 10775, NA 10792, NA 10794, NA 10803, and NA
10906 consist of a group of northern Sinagua pithouse villages and
small masonry pueblo occupied between 900-1250 A.D. based on material
culture and site organization.

[[Page 51901]]

    In 1985, human remains representing three individuals were
recovered from Old Caves (NA 72) during legally authorized salvage
excavations conducted by U.S. Forest Service personnel. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were
present.
    The Old Caves site has been identified as a northern Sinagua
masonry pueblo and ball court occupied between 1250-1325 A.D. based on
material culture, architecture, and site organization.
    In 1939, human remains representing a minimum of sixteen
individuals were removed from Ridge Ruin (NA 1785) during legally
authorized excavations by Dr. John McGregor of the Museum of Northern
Arizona. No known individuals were identified. The 1,595 associated
funerary objects include pottery bowls, jars and pitchers; wood
carvings; stone and bone tools; projectile points; turquoise beads,
jewelry and figurines; shell beads and jewelry; burial mats; woven
baskets; and macaw remains.
    In 1939, human remains representing a minimum of fifteen
individuals were recovered from sites NA 3673 and NA 3676 during
legally authorized excavations by Dr. John McGregor of the Museum of
Northern Arizona. No known individuals were identified. The 118
associated funerary objects include a pottery bowl and sherds, and
stone beads.
    Ridge Ruin and associated sites NA 3673 and NA 3676 have been
identified as a northern Sinagua pueblo and pithouse villages occupied
between 1066-1200 A.D. based on material culture, architecture, and
site organization.
    During the 1940s, human remains representing one individual were
donated to the Museum of Northern Arizona by an anonymous individual
following recovery without a permit from the Honaki site (NA 1255). No
known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is
burial cloth wrappings.
    During the 1940s, human remains representing two individuals were
donated to the Museum of Northern Arizona by an anonymous individual
following recovery without a permit from Sugar Loaf Ruin (NA 1269). No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    In 1965, human remains representing one individual were donated to
the Museum of Northern Arizona by Paul Dyck following recovery without
a permit from the Dyck Site (NA 9471). No known individual was
identified. The 70 associated funerary objects include burial
wrappings, cordage, and shell bracelets.
    During the 1940s, human remains representing one individual were
turned over to Coconino National Forest by an anonymous individual
following recovery without a permit from site NA 19804. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1958, human remains representing one individual from
McGuireville Cave (NA 4007C) were turned over to the Coconino National
Forest by Montezuma Castle National Monument. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1949, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from Panorama Ruin (NA 5111) during legally authorized excavations
conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Between the 1950s and the early 1970s, human remains representing
two individuals were recovered from the Hackberry site (NA 3604) and
the Stoneman Lake site (NA 11254) during legally authorized excavations
by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1987, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from Moon Ranch Pueblo (NA 21979) during legally authorized salvage
excavations conducted by the Coconino National Forest. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    Prior to November 16, 1990, human remains representing one
individual were recovered from site NA 23401 during legally authorized
salvage excavations conducted by the Coconino National Forest. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    The Honanki site, Sugar Loaf Ruin, Dyck site, NA 19804,
McGuireville Cave, Panorama Ruin, Hackberry site, Stoneman Lake site,
Moon Ranch Pueblo, and NA 23401 have been identified as southern
Sinagua pithouses, masonry pueblos, and a cliff dwelling occupied
between 700-1400 A.D. based on material culture, architecture, and site
organization.
    In 1979, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from Sunset Pueblo (NA 1638) during legally authorized excavations
conducted by J.W. Hohman of the Coconino National Forest. No known
individual was identified. The four associated funerary objects include
pottery sherds.
    Sunset Pueblo has been identified as a northern Sinagua masonry
pueblo occupied between 1100-1200 A.D. based on material culture and
site organization.
    In 1928 and 1929, human remains representing eight individuals were
recovered from Turkey Hills Pueblo (NA 660) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by Dr. Byron Cummings of Arizona State
University. No known individuals were identified. The two associated
funerary objects include a pottery jar and bowl (curated at Arizona
State Museum).
    In 1985, human remains representing five individuals were recovered
from the surface of Turkey Hills Pueblo (NA 660) during legally
authorized surface collections conducted by Dr. David Wilcox of the
Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Turkey Hills Pueblo has been identified as a northern Sinagua
pueblo and pithouses occupied between 1250-1325 A.D. based on material
culture, architecture, and site organization.
    Between 1935-1939, human remains representing a minimum of 76
individuals were removed from sites within the Winona Village complex
(NA 2131, NA 2133, NA 2134, NA 3644) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by Dr. John C. McGregor of the Museum of Northern
Arizona. The approximately 44 associated funerary objects include
pottery pitcher, jars, and bowls; and shell and stone beads.
    The Winona Village complex has been identified as a group of
northern Sinagua pithouse villages occupied between 1066-1150 A.D.
based on material culture, architecture, and site organization.
    In 1981, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from site AR 03-04-02-1675 during legally authorized excavations by the
Coconino National Forest. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Site AR 03-04-02-1675 has been identified as a northern Sinagua
masonry pueblo occupied between 1150-1250 A.D. based on material
culture, architecture, and site organization.
    Between 1938 and 1940, human remains representing two individuals
were excavated from Padre Knoll Pueblo (NA 789) during legally
authorized excavations conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Between 1938 and 1940, human remains representing a minimum of five

[[Page 51902]]

individuals were excavated from Turkey Tank Pithouse (NA 2098) during
legally authorized excavations conducted by the Museum of Northern
Arizona. No known individuals were identified. The six associated
funerary objects include pottery bowls and jars.
    Between 1938 and 1940, human remains representing fourteen
individuals were excavated from Turkey Tank Caves (NA 117) during
legally authorized excavations conducted by the Museum of Northern
Arizona. No known individuals were identified. The 32 associated
funerary objects include pottery jars and bowls; and turquoise and
shell beads and ornaments.
    Between 1938 and 1940, human remains representing one individual
were recovered from Deadman's Wash (NA 2077) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Between 1938 and 1940, human remains representing two individuals
were excavated from Jack Smith Alcove House (NA 1295) during legally
authorized excavations conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Between 1938 and 1940, human remains representing one individual
were excavated from site NA 2801 during legally authorized excavations
conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was
identified. The four associated funerary objects include pottery bowl,
pitcher, and sherds.
    Between 1938 and 1940, human remains representing two individuals
were excavated from site NA 3996 during legally authorized excavations
conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Between 1938 and 1940, human remains representing one individual
were excavated from site NA 860 during legally authorized excavations
conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was
identified. The two associated funerary objects consist of a pottery
bowl and a stone tool.
    Padre Knoll Pueblo, Turkey Tank Pithouse, Turkey Tank Caves,
Deadman's Wash, Jack Smith Alcove House, site NA 2801, site NA 3996,
and site NA 860 have been identified as a group of northern Sinagua
pueblo, pithouse, and cave habitations occupied between 900-1400 A.D.
based on material culture, architecture, and site organization.
    During the 1930s, human remains representing three individuals were
excavated from Clear Creek Ruin (NA 2806) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    In 1970-1971, human remains representing six individuals were
excavated from Exhausted Cave (NA 10769) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by Bruce R. Gudgens of Northern Arizona
University. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    Clear Creek Ruin and Exhausted Cave have been identified as a group
of southern Sinagua cliff and cave dwellings occupied between 1100-1400
A.D. based on material culture and site organization.
    In 1931 and 1951, human remains representing six individuals were
excavated from the Juniper Terrace site (NA 1814) during legally
authorized excavations conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No
known individuals were identified. The 102 associated funerary objects
include pottery bowls and jars, stone pipe and beads, and faunal
material.
    The Juniper Terrace site has been identified as a group of northern
Sinagua and Cohonino masonry roomblocks occupied between 1150-1250 A.D.
based on material culture, architecture, and site organization.
    During 1962-1964, human remains representing eleven individuals
were excavated from Two Kivas Pueblo (NA 700) during legally authorized
excavations conducted by Dr. John C. McGregor of the University of
Illinois Urbana-Champaign. No known individuals were identified. The
twelve associated funerary objects include pottery jar and bowls, shell
beads, paint palette, and turquoise ornaments.
    Two Kivas Ruin has been identified as a group of northern Sinagua
pueblos occupied between 1150-1325 A.D. based on material culture,
architecture, and site organization.
    In 1974, human remains representing six individuals were recovered
from site NA 12559 during legally authorized excavations conducted by
the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individuals were identified.
The two associated funerary objects are a pottery sherd and a shell
bracelet.
    Site NA 12559 has been identified as a northern Sinagua trash mound
utilized between 1066-1100 A.D. based on material culture and site
organization.
    In 1970, human remains representing one individual were removed
from Boynton Canyon without a permit by an anonymous individual and
were donated to the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was
identified. The thirteen associated funerary objects include baskets, a
pottery bowl, woven goods, and gourds.
    The Boynton Canyon site is a southern Sinagua cave dwelling site
occupied between 1100-1300 A.D. based on material culture and site
organization.
    In 1938 and 1939, human remains representing five individuals were
recovered from sites NA 3679 and NA 3680 during legally authorized
excavations conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known
individuals were identified. The eight associated funerary objects
include pottery jar and bowls, a shell ring and bracelet, and a
projectile point.
    Sites NA 3679 and NA 3680 have been identified as two northern
Sinagua pithouse villages occupied between 1066-1150 A.D. based on
material culture and site organization.
    During the 1930s and 1970s, human remains representing six
individuals were recovered from site NA 5182 during legally authorized
excavations conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Site NA 5182 has been identified as a northern Sinagua pithouse
village occupied between 1066-1100 A.D. based on material culture and
site organization.
    During the 1930s, human remains representing one individual were
recovered from site NA 914 during legally authorized excavations
conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site NA 914 has been identified as three northern Sinagua rooms
associated with a cave utilized between 900-1300 A.D. based on material
culture and site organization.
    In 1934, human remains representing one individual from site Verde
5:41 were donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology,
Harvard University by Gila Pueblo, an archeological research facility
in Globe, AZ. These human remains had been recovered at an earlier
unknown date during legally authorized collections by Gila Pueblo. No
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Site Verde 5:41 has been identified as a large southern Sinagua
masonry pueblo occupied between 1300-1400

[[Page 51903]]

A.D. based on material culture, architecture, and site organization.
    In 1934, human remains representing three individuals from the
Lookout Ruin site (16:16) were donated to the Peabody Museum of
Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University by Gila Pueblo, an
archeological research facility in Globe, AZ. These human remains had
been recovered at an earlier unknown date during legally authorized
collections by Gila Pueblo. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    The Lookout Ruin site (16:16) has been identified as a northern
Sinagua masonry pueblo occupied between 1150-1300 A.D. based on
material culture, architecture, and site organization.
    In 1934, human remains representing one individual from the Canyon
Padre site were donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology, Harvard University by Gila Pueblo, an archeological research
facility in Globe, AZ. These human remains had been recovered at an
earlier unknown date during legally authorized collections by Gila
Pueblo. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    The Canyon Padre site has been identified as a small northern
Sinagua habitation occupied between 1150-1250 A.D. based on material
culture.
    In 1983, human remains representing one individual were confiscated
from pothunters at site AR 03-04-02-2512 by U.S. Forest Service law
enforcement personnel. No known individual was identified. The 99
associated funerary objects include pottery sherds.
    Site AR 03-04-02-2512 has been identified as a small northern
Sinagua masonry pueblo and associated trash mound utilized between
1150-1250 A.D. based on material culture and site organization.
    Between 1958 and 1960, human remains representing seven individuals
were recovered from the Pershing site (NA 7207) during legally
authorized excavations conducted by Dr. John C. McGregor of the
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. No known individuals were
identified. The three associated funerary objects include chipped
stone.
    The Pershing site has been identified as a large northern Sinagua
village occupied between 900 1066 A.D. based on material culture,
architecture, and site organization.
    Continuities of ethnographic materials, technology, architecture,
and published oral traditions indicate the affiliation of the northern
and southern Sinagua sites with the Hopi Tribe. Oral traditions
presented by representatives of the Hopi Tribe further support the
affiliation with northern and southern Sinagua sites in this area of
north-central Arizona.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the U.S.
Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1),
the human remains listed above represent the physical remains of 2,992
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the U.S. Forest
Service have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A),
the 5,331 objects listed above are reasonably believed to have been
placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or
later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the
U.S. Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001
(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and
associated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe; and the Native American
human remains and associated funerary objects from Chavez Pass Ruin,
Kinikinick Ruin, and the Pollock site with the Hopi Tribe and the
Pueblo of Zuni. .
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Havasupai Tribe, the
Hopi Tribe, the Hualapai Tribe, the Pueblo of Zuni, and the Yavapai-
Prescott Indian Tribe. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that
believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains
and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Frank E. Wozniak,
NAGPRA Coordinator, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service, 517 Gold
Ave. SW, Albuquerque, NM 87102; telephone: (505) 842-3238, fax: (505)
842-3800, before November 3, 1997. Repatriation of the human remains
and associated funerary objects to the culturally affiliated tribes may
begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: September 29, 1997.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 97-26245 Filed 10-2-97 ; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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