[Federal Register: August 27, 1997 (Volume 62, Number 166)]
[Notices]
[Page 45437-45438]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr27au97-112]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
in the Possession of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C.
3003 (d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the
possession of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Bishop
Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the
Hawaiian Civic Club, AluLike, Inc., The Princess Nahoa 'Olelo O
Kamehameha Society, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna
'O Hawai'i Nei, Friends of 'Iolani Palace, and Ka Lahui Hawaii.
    In 1889, Joseph S. Emerson sold a wood image from Waimea, O'ahu, to
the Bishop Museum. Human hair is incorporated into this object. No
known individuals were identified.
    In 1889, a helmet (or wig) incorporating human hair and a refuse
container incorporating human teeth and bone were bequeathed to the
Bishop Museum by Queen Emma. No known individuals were identified.
    In 1889, a kahili incorporating human bone became part of the
original collections of the Bishop Museum. This kahili was given to
Bernice Pauahi by Ke'elikolani. No known individual was identified.
    In 1891, a refuse container incorporating human teeth and a kahili
incorporating human bone were acquired with the collections of the
Hawaiian National Museum which were transferred to the Bishop Museum.
No further documentation is available. No known individuals were
identified.
    In 1892 or before, an image from Kaua'i with human hair was
purchased by Bishop Museum Director William T. Brigham on behalf of the
Bishop Museum. No known individuals were identified.
    Prior to 1892, an image incorporating human hair was received as a
gift by the Bishop Museum from the Trustees of O'ahu College. No known
individuals were identified.
    Prior to 1892, two bracelets incorporating human bone were received
from an unknown source as part of the original Bishop Museum
collections. No known individuals were identified.
    In 1893, a sash with human teeth, a pahu (drum) incorporating human
teeth, and a refuse container with human teeth were removed from
'Iolani Palace by the Provisional Government and sent into the
collections of the Bishop Museum. No known individuals were identified.
    In 1895, an image incorporating human hair was purchased by the
Bishop Museum from the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign
Missions. No further information is available. No known individual was
identified.
    In 1908, an ipu with human teeth from Kohala, Hawai'i was purchased
by the Bishop Museum from the estate of William E.H. Deverill. No
further information is available. No known individual was identified.
    In 1910, a sash incorporating human teeth was received by the
Bishop Museum as a gift from Queen Lili'uokalani. No further
information is available. No individual was identified.
    In 1916, a piece of fishhook made of human bone and a tool made of
human bone were donated to the Bishop Museum by Mr. Albert F. Judd, Jr.
No further information is available. No individuals were identified.
    In 1920, a kahili incorporating human bone was received by the
Bishop Museum as a gift from Elizabeth Keka'ani'auokalani Pratt and Ewa
K. Cartwright Styne. No further information is available. No individual
was identified.
    In 1923, three kahili incorporating human bone were received by the
Bishop Museum as a gift from Elizabeth Kahanu Kalaniana'ole Woods. No
further information is available. No individuals were identified.
    In 1932, a kahili handle incorporating human bone was received by
the Bishop Museum as a bequest from Lucy K. Peabody.
    In 1936, a netting shuttle of human bone was received by the Bishop
Museum as a gift from Annie E. Zablan. The donor's father had obtained
this shuttle in 1917 from Eugene Duvechelle. No known individual was
identified.
    In 1936, an awl of human bone was received by the Bishop Museum as
a gift from John M. Warinner who had obtained it from a cave on the
Kohala side of Keauhou. No known individual was identified.
    In 1940, two pieces of human bone modified for tool making were
removed from a cave at Keauhou, Kona, Hawai'i and donated to the Bishop
Museum by Keith K. Jones. No known individual was identified.
    In 1944, a refuse container incorporating human teeth was donated
to the Bishop Museum by Catherine

[[Page 45438]]

Goodale. This container had been on loan to the Bishop Museum since
1928. No known individual was identified.
    In 1946, a composite fishhook of human bone was received by the
Bishop Museum. The donor and means of acquisition are unknown. No known
individual was identified.
    In 1949, a fishing toggle of human bone from Kalalau Valley, Kaua'i
was donated to the Bishop Museum by Rebecca Banks. No known individual
was identified.
    In 1989, an inventory of the collection included four human teeth
which may have been parts of a necklace or similar ornamentation. No
further information is available. No known individuals were identified.
    In consultation with Native Hawaiian organizations, the Bishop
Museum has decided that no attempt would be made to determine the age
of the human remains. These human remains and cultural items are Native
Hawaiian based on geographic location and known Native Hawaiian
tradition and practices.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the Bishop
Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (b) (4-6) the 34
objects listed above are not sacred objects, unassociated funerary
objects, or objects of cultural patrimony. Based on consultation with
Native Hawaiian organizations and anthropological evidence, the Bishop
Museum has determined that, pursuant to Section 10.2 (d)(1), these
human remains were not freely given or naturally shed by the
individuals from whose bodies they were obtained. Officials of the
Bishop Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the
human remains listed above represent the physical remains of a minimum
of 34 individuals of Native American ancestry. Lastly, officials of the
Bishop Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2),
there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and the
Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna 'O Hawai'i Nei, The
Princess Nahoa Olelo 'O Kamehameha Society, and Friends of 'Iolani
Palace. .
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Office of Hawaiian
Affairs, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna 'O Hawai'i Nei, The Princess Nahoa
Olelo 'O Kamehameha Society, Friends of 'Iolani Palace, Daughters and
Sons of Hawaiian Warriors, James Bartels, Quentin Kawananakoa, and Matt
Mattice. Representatives of any other Native Hawaiian organization that
believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains
should contact Janet Ness, Registrar, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum,
1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu, HI 96817; telephone: (805) 848-4105,
before September 26, 1997. Repatriation of the human remains to the
Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna 'O Hawai'i Nei, The
Princess Nahoa Olelo 'O Kamehameha Society, and Friends of 'Iolani
Palace may begin after that date if no additional claimants come
forward.
Dated: August 14, 1997.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 97-22736 Filed 8-26-97; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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