[Federal Register: May 30, 1996 (Volume 61, Number 105)]
[Notices]
[Page 27097]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects from the Vicinity of Victorville, CA in
the Possession of the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, Los
Angeles, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C.
3003 (d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains and
associated funerary objects in the possession of the Los Angeles County
Museum of Natural History, Los Angeles, CA.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Los
Angeles County Museum of Natural History, Los Angeles, CA professional
staff in consultation with representatives of the San Manuel Band of
Mission Indians.
    In 1928, human remains representing four individuals, including
three adults and one infant, were excavated by Arthur Woodward, a
member of the museum staff. No known individuals were identified. The
three associated funerary objects include three strings of olivella
shell disk beads.
    Accession documentation describes the remains and associated
funerary objects as, ``Material from the ranch of J.C. Turner, in sandy
Mohave Riverbed 12 miles north of Victorville. Combination village and
burial site.'' The human remains and associated funerary objects are
dated to A.D. 1690-1770, based on the presence of incised olivella wall
beads. A representative of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians has
confirmed that the Turner Ranch site lies within traditional Serrano
lands and is an historic Serrano village.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the Los
Angeles County Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant
to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the
physical remains of four individuals of Native American ancestry.
Officials of the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History have also
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), that the three
strings of olivella beads listed above are reasonably believed to have
been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death
or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of
the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History have determined that,
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group
identity which can be reasonably traced between these Native American
human remains and associated funerary objects and the San Manuel Band
of Mission Indians.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the San Manuel Band of
Mission Indians. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that
believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains
and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Margaret Ann Hardin,
Curator and Section Head, Anthropology, the Los Angeles County Museum
of Natural History, 900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, CA; telephone:
(213) 744-3382, before [thirty days after publication in the Federal
Register]. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary
objects to the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians may begin after that
date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: May 22, 1996
Francis P. McManamon
Departmental Consulting Archeologist
Chief, Archeology and Ethnology Program
[FR Doc. 96-13582 Filed 5-29-96; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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