[Federal Register: May 2, 1996 (Volume 61, Number 86)]
[Notices]
[Page 19635]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]

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[[Page 19635]]

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and an Associated Funerary Object from Arizona in the Possession of the
Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C.
3003(d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains and an
associated funerary object from Arizona in the Possession of the Hood
Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the museums
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Gila
River Indian Community.
    Both of the items described below were collected in 1906 at
Sacaton, Arizona by Frank and Clara Churchill. Frank Churchill was a
Special Federal Inspector of Indian Schools who bequeathed his
collection to Dartmouth College in 1946. Both items were further
identified as having been ``found six inches beneath the surface,
Sacaton, Arizona''.
    The human remains include about 200 ``human bone fragments from a
burial jar'' based on Hood Museum records. Information from the
professional staff indicate that these remains are from at least three
individuals and that some of the fragments appear to be from fetal
bones. Due to the very fragmentary nature of the remains no further
information was available.
    The burial jar is an Olla (water jar) decorated with red on white
floral designs. The jar is 5 3/4 in. high by 7 1/2 in. in diameter at
the belly. The neck has a 4 1/4 in. diameter. In 1979 this vessel was
mistakenly identified as stylistically similar to those produced by the
Tarahumara of Chihuahua, Mexico. Officials of the Gila River Indian
Community have, based on their evaluation of photographic materials,
confirmed that this jar is consistent with the pottery of the Gila
River Indian Community.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the Hood
Museum of Art have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the
human remains listed above represent the physical remains of at least
three individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Hood
Museum of Art have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001
(3)(A), the object listed above is reasonably believed to have been
placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or
later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the
Hood Museum of Art have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001
(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and
associated funerary object and the Gila River Indian Community.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Gila River Indian
Community. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes
itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains and
associated funerary object should contact Kellen G. Haak, Registrar and
repatriation Coordinator, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College,
Hanover, NH 03755; telephone: (603) 646-3109, before June 3, 1996.
Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the
Gila River Indian Community may begin after that date if no additional
claimants come forward.
Dated: April 26, 1996
Francis P. McManamon
Departmental Consulting Archeologist
Chief, Archeology and Ethnography Program
[FR Doc. 96-10957 Filed 5-1-96; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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