Federal Register  / Vol. 60 No.  156 / Monday, August  14, 1995 /

          Notices                                        Page 41898 & 41899



          DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR



          National Park Service



          Notice of Inventory Completion  for Native American Human Remains

          and  Associated Funerary Objects from  the State of  Texas in the

          Possession of  The Fort Hood Archeological  Laboratory, Ft. Hood,

          TX



          AGENCY:  National Park Service, Interior



          ACTION:  Notice



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          Notice  is  hereby given  in  accordance with  provisions  of the

          Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, 25 U.S.C.

          3003(d),  of the completion of the inventory of human remains and

          associated  funerary  objects in  the  curation  facility of  the

          Directorate of Public  Works at Fort Hood, TX  from five sites in

          the state of Texas.



          A detailed  inventory and  assessment of these  remains has  been

          made  by the staff archeologist at Fort Hood in consultation with





          representatives of the Comanche Tribe of Oklahoma and the Tonkawa

          tribe of Oklahoma.   Copies of this inventory have also been sent

          to  the Apache  Tribe  of Oklahoma,  the  Wichita and  Affiliated

          Tribes, the Caddo Indian Tribe of Oklahoma and the Kiowa Tribe.



          The partial  and fragmentary human remains of 48 individuals were

          recovered in 1985  from a  vandalized burial  ground at  Javalina

          shelter  in Bell  County,  Texas.   A total  of  1,214 bones  and

          fragments were  recovered from  the surface  where they  had been

          discarded by  vandals.  Inventory and examination  of the remains

          established  that   the  partial   remains  of  20   adults,  ten

          adolescents, nine children and nine infants were present.  Sex of

          the remains could not  be determined.  No known  individuals were

          identified.  Artifacts recovered from  the site with the  remains

          included a flake of obsidian and debitage of local cherts.  



          This  site has  been identified  as  being within  the Comanche's

          traditional  occupation  area based  on  the  abnormal number  of

          juvenile  remains,  suggesting  a  historical  disease  epidemic,

          evidence  of  access  to  obsidian, the  Comanche  occupation  of

          Central  Texas  in  historic  times, and  consultation  with  the

          Comanche  Tribe.    Based  on the  above  mentioned  information,

          officials  of   the  Fort  Hood  Archeological   Laboratory  have

          determined  that,  pursuant  to  25U.S.C.  3001(2),  there  is  a

          relationship  of shared  group identity  which can  be reasonably

          traced  between  these  human  remains  and  associated  funerary

          objects  and  the Comanche  Tribe.   Officials  of the  Fort Hood





          Archeological Laboratory have also  determined that the artifacts

          are reasonably believed to have been placed with individual human

          remains either at the time of death or later as a part of a death

          rite or ceremony of a culture, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A).



          On  November 22,  1991  the above  human  remains and  associated

          funerary objects were repatriated  to the Reverend John Pahdocony

          of  the Comanche  Cemetery Committee  on  behalf of  the Comanche

          Tribal Council.  



          The partial  and fragmentary  remains of  a one  adult individual

          were collected in 1986 from an erosional gully on the bank of the

          Leon  River near Fort Griffin,  Bell County, Texas.   The remains

          eroded from  the bank of  the Leon  River near a  dark and  dense

          midden deposit from an open campsite on the flood plain.  The sex

          of the individual could  not be determined.  No  known individual

          was identified.  



          This site  has been  identified  as being  within the  Comanche's

          traditional  occupation   area,   based  on   consultation   with

          representatives  of  the  Comanche  Tribe  and  written  historic

          records.  



          Officials  of  the   Fort  Hood  Archeological  Laboratory   have

          determined  that,  pursuant  to 25  U.S.C.  3001(2),  there is  a

          relationship  of shared  group identity  which can  be reasonably

          traced between these human remains and the Comanche Tribe.





          On  November  22, 1992  the  above mentioned  human  remains were

          repatriated  to  Phillip R.  Narcomey  of  the Comanche  Cemetery

          Committee on behalf of the Comanche Tribal Council.  



          The  partial and fragmentary  remains of  a one  adult individual

          were  collected in 1992 from  the surface of  a vandalized burial

          site (41BL0844).  The remains consist of nine bone fragments.  No

          known individual was identified.  



          This site  has been  identified  as being  within the  Comanche's

          traditional  occupation   area,   based  on   consultation   with

          representatives  of  the  Comanche  Tribe  and  written  historic

          records.  



          Officials  of   the  Fort  Hood  Archeological   Laboratory  have

          determined  that,  pursuant  to 25  U.S.C.  3001(2),  there is  a

          relationship  of shared  group identity  which can  be reasonably

          traced between these human remains and the Comanche Tribe.  



          On  November 21,  1993  the above  mentioned  human remains  were

          repatriated  to  Phillip R.  Narcomey  of  the Comanche  Cemetery

          Committee on behalf of the Comanche Tribal Council.



          The partial and fragmentary human remains of six individuals were

          recovered  during  the summer  of  1990 from  a  rockshelter site

          (41BL671)  on Fort Hood, by a field school conducted by Texas A&M

          University.  Inventory and examination of the remains established





          that the remains of two adult males, one adult female, one  child

          between the  ages of 6 and  10 years, one new-born  child, and an

          individual  whose age and sex could not be determined.  Artifacts

          recovered  elsewhere in  the site  suggested it  was  occupied by

          peoples of the Toyah and  Austin Foci, acknowledged as  ancestral

          to the Tonkawa Tribe.  No known individuals were identified.  



          This site  has  been identified  as  being within  the  Tonkawa's

          aboriginal occupation  area based on  the oral traditions  of the

          Tonkawa  tribe  and historic  accounts  of  their occupations  in

          central  Texas through consultations  with representatives of the

          Tonkawa   Tribe  of  Oklahoma.    Officials   of  the  Fort  Hood

          Archeological Laboratory  have determined  that,  pursuant to  25

          U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of  shared group identity

          which can  be reasonably traced  between these human  remains and

          the Tonkawa Tribe who are generally acknowledged to have occupied

          the  Bell County area of central  Texas before the arrival of the

          Comanche in the eighteenth century.



          On November 20, 1994 the above six human remains were repatriated

          to  Ms. Virginia  Combrink,  President of  the  Tonkawa Tribe  of

          Oklahoma on behalf of that Tribe.



          Between  1984 and February 25,  1986, 78 fragments  of human bone

          representing  four  individuals were  collected  from rockshelter

          site (41BL0069)  on Fort Hood,  by a field  party from Texas  A&M

          University.  Inventory and examination of the remains established





          that the remains  of two adult  individuals, one adolescent,  and

          one  child between the ages  of 6 and 10 years,  sex could not be

          determined.  Artifacts recovered  elsewhere in the site suggested

          it  was occupied by prehistoric  peoples of the  Toyah and Austin

          Foci.  No known individuals were identified.  



          This  site  has been  identified  as being  within  the Tonkawa's

          aboriginal  occupation area based  on the oral  traditions of the

          Tonkawa  tribe  and historic  accounts  of  their occupations  in

          central Texas through  consultations with representatives of  the

          Tonkawa  Tribe  of   Oklahoma.    Officials  of   the  Fort  Hood

          Archeological  Laboratory  have   determined  that,  pursuant  to

          25U.S.C.  3001(2),  there  is  a  relationship  of  shared  group

          identity  which  can be  reasonably  traced  between these  human

          remains and the Tonkawa  Tribe who are generally acknowledged  to

          have  occupied the Bell County  area of central  Texas before the

          arrival of the Comanche in the eighteenth century.





          During  the  1978 recording  of 41CV0130  on  Fort Hood  a single

          fragment of a human adult femur was recovered from surface spoil.

          41CV0130  also yielded  evidence  of occupation  during the  late

          archaic period.  



          This  site  has been  identified  as being  within  the Tonkawa's

          aboriginal  occupation area based  on the oral  traditions of the

          Tonkawa  tribe  and historic  accounts  of  their occupations  in





          central Texas  through consultations with representatives  of the

          Tonkawa  Tribe  of   Oklahoma.    Officials  of   the  Fort  Hood

          Archeological  Laboratory  have   determined  that,  pursuant  to

          25U.S.C.  3001(2),  there  is  a  relationship  of  shared  group

          identity  which  can be  reasonably  traced  between these  human

          remains and the Tonkawa  Tribe who are generally acknowledged  to

          have  occupied the Bell County  area of central  Texas before the

          arrival of the Comanche in the eighteenth century.



          This notice has  been sent to officials  of the Tonkawa  tribe of

          Oklahoma, The Comanche Tribe,  the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes,

          the  Caddo  Tribe of  Oklahoma, the  Kiowa  Tribe and  the Apache

          Tribe.  Representatives  of any other Indian tribe which believes

          itself  to  be culturally  affiliated  with  these human  remains

          should contact Dr. Jack M. Jackson, Fort Hood Staff Archeologist,

          HQ III Corps and  Fort Hood, attn: AFZF-PW-ENV, Fort  Hood, Texas

          76544-5057; telephone (817) 287-7965, before  September 13, 1995.

          Repatriation  of  the  human  remains  from  sites  41BL0069  and

          41CV0130  may begin  after that date  if no  additional claimants

          come forward.



          Dated: August 7, 1995







          Francis P. McManamon

          Departmental Consulting Archeologist





          Chief, Archeological Assistance Division

          [FR Doc. 95-19958; Filed 8-11-95; 8:45 am]

          BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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