FR Doc E8-24963[Federal Register: October 21, 2008 (Volume 73, Number 204)]
[Notices]               
[Page 62537-62538]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr21oc08-94]                         


[[Page 62537]]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service
 
Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department 
of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO; Correction

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice; correction.
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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the University of Denver Department of 
Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    This notice rescinds a Notice of Inventory Completion published in 
the Federal Register of July 2, 2001 (FR Doc 01-16547, pages 34956-
34957). After further consideration of the evidence, museum officials 
have determined that the human remains are of Native American ancestry, 
but that there is not sufficient available evidence that can lead to a 
reasonable assignment of cultural affiliation as defined at 25 U.S.C. 
3001 (2). This research conclusion was supported by feedback during 
tribal consultations, claims to the area, associated funerary objects, 
and a rendering of the pictograph found at Cave 5 on the T.O Ranch.
    The original notice identified a relationship of shared group 
identity that was reasonably traced between the Native American human 
remains and the associated funerary objects with the Apache Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; 
Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; Comanche Nation, Oklahoma; Fort 
McDowell Yavapai Nation Arizona; Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa 
Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero 
Reservation, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Ohkay 
Owingeh, New Mexico (formerly the Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of 
Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa 
Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; 
San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tonto 
Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache 
Reservation, Arizona; Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian 
Reservation, Arizona; Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of 
the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.
    After July 2, 2001, museum officials contracted a research 
archeologist and conducted additional consultations with 
representatives of the Comanche Nation, Oklahoma; Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Navajo Nation, Arizona, 
New Mexico & Utah; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico (formerly the Pueblo of 
San Juan); Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni 
Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. The museum also sent reports 
and solicited feedback via telephone and correspondence with 
representatives from the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Arapahoe Tribe of 
the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, 
Arizona; Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Kiowa Indian Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, 
New Mexico; San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, 
Arizona; Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of 
the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp 
Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona; and Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas.
    In the notice of July 2, 2001, the human remains representing a 
minimum of one individual (catalog number DU6065) were removed from an 
unknown location in the Southwestern part of the United States between 
the 1920s and the 1950s, possibly by Dr. E.B. Renaud, founder of the 
University of Denver Department of Anthropology, or H.B. Roberts, who 
often worked on Dr. Renaud's excavations. The human remains include a 
cranium of a young adult female with worn dentition and no evidence of 
cranial flattening (cradleboarding). The cranium is labeled by H.B. 
Roberts in pencil as "Basketmaker Female Early Southwest." Catalog 
records do not identify a specific site or any archeological context. 
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present. Officials at the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology 
recognize that scholars have historically attributed the activity of 
cradleboarding to Pueblo Tribes, but during consultation, Pueblo 
officials knew of examples of other groups who used cradleboards. In 
the absence of specific archeological dates, representatives agreed 
that cranial flattening was not specifically a Pueblo cultural 
practice.
    In the notice of July 2, 2001, the human remains representing one 
individual (catalog number DU6067) and 198 associated funerary objects 
were recovered from a cave (Renaud number Cave 6) on the T.O. Ranch, 
near Folsom, Colfax County, NM, by Dr. E.B. Renaud of the University of 
Denver Department of Anthropology in 1929. No known individual was 
identified. The 198 associated funerary objects are 9 bone awls, 1 
antler flaker, 124 bone beads (found in the configuration of a 
necklace), 1 hammerstone, 2 choppers, 1 stone pounder, 1 metate, and 59 
chipped stone tools. The assemblage has been dated to the terminal 
Archaic/Transitional Basketmaker (circa 200 B.C. to A.D. 700 based on 
the archeological context of the site).
    Dr. Renaud collected the human remains and funerary objects while 
on an expedition sponsored by the Colorado Museum of Natural History 
(now the Denver Museum of Nature & Science). The burial site and other 
caves in the area included corn cobs as well as fragments of yucca 
sandals that Dr. Reynaud says resemble those found by Kidder and 
Guernsey in northeastern Arizona. Dr. Renaud characterizes the entire 
culture as "primitive maize growers." Dr. Renaud links Cave 6 with 
another cave in the area, Cave 5, based on the relative position of the 
hearths and the similarity of the lithic and animal bone assemblages. 
He concludes that the occupations of these neighboring caves were 
essentially the

[[Page 62538]]

same and contemporaneous, and that both reflect the same culture. A 
pictograph appears at the opening of Cave 5, described as a small, 
conventionalized male figure with squared-shoulders.
    The expedition encompassed the Cimarron Valley, including Kenton 
Caves in the panhandle of Oklahoma. Based on the material culture, 
Renaud groups all the sites in the Cimarron Valley as a discrete 
cultural group, which he describes alternatively as "Basketmaker," 
"Primitive Basketmaker," and "Fumerole." The lack of specific 
evidence does not make cultural affiliation conclusive. A review of 
more recent literature regarding the Cimarron Valley reveals that as a 
result of scattered artifact collections, inadequate material 
descriptions, and poor provenience information, assigning cultural 
affiliation to these sites is impossible.
    Based on the information described above, including tribal 
consultation and expert opinion, officials of the University of Denver 
Museum of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 
(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably 
traced between the Native American human remains and associated 
funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe.
    Representatives of any Native American tribe who wish to comment on 
this notice should address their comments to Dr. Christina Kreps, 
University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Sturm 146, Denver, CO 
80208, telephone (303) 871-2688, before November 20, 2008.
    The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology is responsible for 
notifying the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind 
River Reservation, Wyoming; Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; 
Comanche Nation, Oklahoma; Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, Arizona; Fort 
Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Jicarilla Apache 
Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Mescalero Apache 
Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; Ohkay Owingeh, New 
Mexico (formerly the Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New 
Mexico; San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; 
Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort 
Apache Reservation, Arizona; Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde 
Indian Reservation, Arizona; Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni 
Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: October 6, 2008
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-24963 Filed 10-20-08; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4312-50-S


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