FR Doc 2010-4213[Federal Register: March 2, 2010 (Volume 75, Number 40)]
[Notices]               
[Page 9428-9429]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr02mr10-69]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

 
Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of 
Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Peabody Museum of 
Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, that meet 
the definitions of ``sacred objects'' and ``objects of cultural 
patrimony'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these 
cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    The 10 cultural items are 4 corn husk face masks and 6 false face 
masks. An assessment of these 10 cultural items was made by Peabody 
Museum staff in consultation with representatives of the Haudenosaunee 
Confederacy.
    In 1905, Lewis H. Farlow purchased a false face mask from Grace 
Nicholson, a dealer, and donated it to the Peabody Museum. Museum 
documentation states the object is from New York, and dates the object 
to the late 19th century. The face is described in the museum ledger as 
``Iroquois.''
    In 1906, Lewis H. Farlow purchased a false face mask from Grace 
Nicholson, a dealer, and donated it to the Peabody Museum. Museum 
documentation dates the object to the late 19th century. The face is 
described in the museum ledger as ``Iroquois.''
    In 1995, the Peabody Museum received four corn husk face masks and 
four false face masks through a bequest by William R. Wright. Museum 
accession records date the corn husk face masks to the late 20th 
century, and describe them as ``Iroquois.'' Museum accession records 
date the false face masks to the 1970s or 1980s, and describe them as 
``Iroquois.''
    Other than the ``Iroquois'' attribution, more specific cultural 
affiliation of the masks to any one particular nation of the 
Haudenosaunee is not possible by the museum. The Haudenosaunee 
Confederacy includes the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and 
Tuscarora Nations. According to Haudenosaunee culture and traditions, 
the Onondaga Nation is the keeper of the central hearth and fire where 
the Grand Council of the Confederacy meets. As the keeper of the 
central fire, the Onondaga Nation is obligated to care for, and return 
to the appropriate Nation, the Haudenosaunee cultural objects that are 
not specifically affiliated with any one Haudenosaunee Nation. Written 
evidence of Haudenosaunee oral tradition presented during consultation 
identifies the false face masks as being sacred objects needed by 
traditional Haudenosaunee religious leaders. False Face masks and corn 
husk

[[Page 9429]]

masks are also considered to be objects of cultural patrimony that have 
ongoing historical, traditional, and cultural significance to the group 
and could not have been alienated by a single individual. False face 
masks and corn husk face masks continue to play an important, ongoing 
role in the spiritual and religious identity of contemporary 
Haudenosaunee people.
    These sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony are believed 
to be culturally affiliated to the Onondaga Nation of New York, on 
behalf of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy (also known as the Iroquois 
Confederacy or Six Nations, including the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, 
Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora Nations, which are represented by the 
following Federally-recognized tribes: Cayuga Nation of New York; 
Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; 
Onondaga Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga 
Tribe of Oklahoma; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York; Tonawanda Band 
of Seneca Indians of New York; and Tuscarora Nation of New York). The 
specific cultural attribution of these objects in museum records 
indicates an affiliation to the Haudenosaunee people. New York and the 
Six Nations Reserve in Canada lie within the traditional territory of 
the Haudenosaunee people. Consultation evidence and other research 
supports a finding that the stylistic characteristics of the objects 
reported here are consistent with traditional Haudenosaunee forms. 
Thus, the cultural items' cultural affiliation with the Haudenosaunee 
Confederacy is established through anthropological, geographical, and 
historical information; museum records; consultation evidence; and 
expert opinion.
    Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(C), the 10 cultural 
items described above are specific ceremonial objects needed by 
traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of 
traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. 
Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(D), the 10 cultural 
items described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural 
importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, 
rather than property owned by an individual. Lastly, officials of the 
Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group 
identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred objects/
objects of cultural patrimony and the Cayuga Nation of New York; Oneida 
Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Onondaga 
Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York; Tonawanda Band of Seneca 
Indians of New York; and Tuscarora Nation of New York.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the sacred objects/objects of cultural 
patrimony should contact Patricia Capone, Repatriation Coordinator, 
Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 
Divinity Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617) 496-3702, before 
April 1, 2010. Repatriation of the sacred objects/objects of cultural 
patrimony to the Cayuga Nation of New York; Oneida Nation of New York; 
Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation of New York; 
Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Saint Regis 
Mohawk Tribe, New York; Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York; 
and Tuscarora Nation of New York, may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The Peabody Museum is responsible for notifying the Cayuga Nation 
of New York; Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of 
Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; 
Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York; 
Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York; and Tuscarora Nation of 
New York, that this notice has been published.

    Dated: November 24, 2009
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2010-4213 Filed 3-1-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S



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