[Federal Register: June 18, 2009 (Volume 74, Number 116)]
[Notices]               
[Page 28942-28943]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr18jn09-38]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

 
Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, 
Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Horner 
Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, that meet the 
definition of ``sacred objects'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    The three cultural items are two cradle baskets and one basket cap.
    The Museum of Oregon Country, Oregon Agricultural College was

[[Page 28943]]

renamed the John B. Horner Museum of the Oregon Country in 1936, and 
became commonly known as the Horner Museum. The Oregon Agricultural 
College was renamed the Oregon State College in 1937, and became Oregon 
State University in 1962. The Horner Museum closed in 1995. Currently, 
cultural items from the Horner Museum are referred to as the Horner 
Collection.
    The Horner Collection, Oregon State University professional staff 
consulted with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz 
Reservation, Oregon; Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Indians of Oregon; 
Duckwater Shoshone Tribe of the Duckwater Reservation, Nevada; Hoopa 
Valley Tribe, California; Karuk Tribe of California; Pit River Tribe, 
California (includes XL Ranch, Big Bend, Likely, Lookout, Montgomery 
Creek and Roaring Creek Rancherias); Smith River Rancheria, California; 
and Yurok Tribe of the Yurok Reservation, California. The Big Lagoon 
Rancheria, California; Blue Lake Rancheria, California; Cher-Ae Heights 
Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria, California; Quartz Valley 
Indian Community of the Quartz Valley Reservation of California; and 
Resighini Rancheria, California, were notified about the cultural items 
described in this notice, but did not participate in the consultations.
    On June 8, 1973, the C.B. Kennedy Family and Mrs. Ruth Kennedy 
Tartar through Dr. N.L. Tartar (executor of estate) donated a 
collection of Oregon and coastal California Indian basketry to the 
Horner Collection. Among the collection are a cradle basket and basket 
cap. Museum records indicate that Mr. C.B. Kennedy, Mrs. Kennedy, and 
their daughter, Ruth, were avid collectors of Native American 
artifacts, including projectile points, pottery, photographs, bows and 
arrows, beadwork, and carvings, in addition to Indian basketry. Museum 
records also include a typewritten account of the ``Story of Ella 
Ben,'' a Rogue River Indian residing on the Siletz Reservation. This 
story indicates that a friendly relationship existed between Ella Ben 
and the Kennedy family. Ella Ben was known to sell basketry that she 
had made in Newport, OR, and the story indicates that Mrs. Kennedy 
purchased several items from her between 1911 and 1916.
    Newport, OR, is located within the Siletz Reservation Indians' 
traditional territory. According to the Report of the Commissioner of 
Indian Affairs, Accompanying The Annual Report of the Secretary of the 
Interior For the Year 1857, the Confederated Tribes of the Rogue River 
and Shasta Indians were removed to the coastal Siletz Reservation, 
under the immediate charge of Agent Robert B. Metcalfe. The Siletz 
Indian Agency, in a report dated July 15, 1857, noted that the tribes 
of Indians which are located in the Siletz district include the Shasta 
or Upper Rogue River Indians.
    Consultants from the Siletz Reservation have viewed the basket cap 
and have attributed the materials used and the style of the basket to 
be that of Siletz weavers from the Northwest coast. Siletz consultants 
identified the basket cap as a cap that would be used in ceremonial 
dancing, and the ceremonies continue to take place. In fact, the basket 
cap in question has been loaned previously to members of the Siletz 
Reservation for use in ceremonies and dancing. Based on museum records 
and consultation with Siletz tribal representatives, the Horner 
Collection, Oregon State University reasonably believes that the basket 
cap is a sacred item that is culturally affiliated with the 
Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon.
    According to Siletz tribal representatives, the cradle basket 
appears too small to be a Gaayu intended for actual use, but instead, 
was made as a special wedding gift and as a sacred item meant to bind 
families together through marriage. Such cradle baskets are considered 
sacred objects, as they embody a prayer for offspring for the couple 
who will be bringing forth the next generation. Traditionally, cradle 
baskets are personal property and people hold onto the basket for their 
entire lives. Tribal representatives from the Siletz Reservation have 
attributed the cradle basket materials and the style of the basket to 
be that of Siletz weavers from the Northwest coast. They also indicate 
that these cradle baskets are a symbol of making medicine and blessing 
future family offspring and relationships. Based on geographic, 
historic documents, museum and donor history, and consultation with 
Siletz consultants, the Horner Collection, Oregon State University 
reasonably believes the cradle basket is a sacred item that is 
culturally affiliated with the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz 
Reservation, Oregon.
    At an unknown date, by an unknown person, a cradle basket was 
removed from an unknown location. There are no museum records for this 
item. Consultants from the Siletz Reservation have viewed this cradle 
basket and have attributed the materials used and the style of the 
basket to be that of Siletz weavers from the Northwest coast. The 
cradle basket is almost identical in shape and design to the previously 
described cradle basket. Based on the similarity of style and design, 
it is reasonably believed that the cradle basket is most likely also a 
sacred object and culturally affiliated with the Confederated Tribes of 
the Siletz Reservation, Oregon.
    Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(C), the three cultural 
items described above are specific ceremonial objects needed by 
traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of 
traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. 
Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the sacred objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz 
Reservation, Oregon.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the sacred objects should contact Sabah 
Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, 
Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration Building, Corvallis, 
OR 97331, telephone (541) 737-8260, before [insert date 30 days 
following publication in the Federal Register]. Repatriation of the 
sacred objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, 
Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    The Horner Collection, Oregon State University is responsible for 
notifying the Big Lagoon Rancheria, California; Blue Lake Rancheria, 
California; Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria, 
California; Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon; Cow 
Creek Band of Umpqua Indians of Oregon; Duckwater Shoshone Tribe of the 
Duckwater Reservation, Nevada; Hoopa Valley Tribe, California; Karuk 
Tribe of California; Pit River Tribe, California; Quartz Valley Indian 
Community of the Quartz Valley Reservation of California; Resighini 
Rancheria, California; Smith River Rancheria, California; and Yurok 
Tribe of the Yurok Reservation, California that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: May 18, 2009
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E9-14297 Filed 6-17-09; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S



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