FR Doc E7-16774
[Federal Register: August 24, 2007 (Volume 72, Number 164)]
[Notices]               
[Page 48672-48675]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr24au07-101]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of 
Natural History, Chicago, IL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Field Museum of 
Natural History (Field Museum), Chicago, IL that meet the definition of 
"cultural items" under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    The 56 cultural items are 19 Gaan masks, 18 wands (5 are associated 
with masks), 16 hoops, 1 bullroarer, and 1 medicine string attached to 
a buckskin bag.
    The first Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack, and 
is associated with two wands (catalog number 68807). The cloth hood is 
black and brownish in color and has three small openings for the eyes 
and mouth. The rack, made from wood, yucca, or sotol slats, is painted 
with geometric designs and dots in red, white, and black. The two wands 
both come to a point on one end and appear to be blackened. The second 
Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack, and is associated 
with two wands (catalog number 68808). The hood is primarily black. The 
rack consists of three vertical sections and is painted red, green, 
black, and white. Three red dangles hang from each end of the bottom 
horizontal piece of the rack. The two wands are painted with geometric 
and curvilinear designs. One wand has a diagonally pointed end. The 
other wand has a crosspiece near the top.
    The third Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 68809). The cloth hood is black and has three small 
holes for the eyes and mouth. The rack consists of five laths making up 
one vertical section and has a horizontal section of four pointed laths 
attached across the middle and are attached at a diagonal at the base 
and near the top of the rack. The rack is

[[Page 48673]]

painted with geometric designs in green, red, black, blue, and white. 
The fourth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack, and is 
associated with one wand (catalog number 68810). The cloth hood appears 
black and has two small holes for the eyes. The rack consists of a 
horizontal section across the bottom with a ``sunburst'' at the top. 
The rack is painted in geometric designs in red, yellow, and black. The 
wand has a crosspiece and is painted in red and black. The design 
consists of black zigzag lines filled in with red.
    The fifth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 68817). The hood is in very poor condition and the U-
shaped support piece that holds the rack in place can be seen. The 
trident shaped rack is painted in red, white, and black. The sixth Gaan 
mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack (catalog number 68818). 
The hood is in poor condition. The trident shaped rack has attached 
crosspieces, and painted with geometric designs and dots in red and 
black. The seventh Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 84673). The cloth hood is black with three small 
perforations for the eyes and mouth. The rack consists of a central 
piece made up of six vertical laths each coming to a point at the top. 
It has triangular pieces jutting out, and two horizontal pieces with 
what appear to be sunbursts on each end. The rack is painted in 
geometric designs and dots in red, white, and blue and[sol]or black.
    The eighth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 84674). The hood is black with perforations for the 
eyes with a brass button attached over each eye perforation. The 
trident shaped rack is painted with geometric designs in red, blue, 
black, yellow, and white. A set of red dangles hang down on each end of 
the rack's horizontal support piece. The ninth Gaan mask consists of a 
cloth hood and attached rack (catalog number 84675). The cloth hood is 
black with two small perforations for the eyes with a brass button over 
each eye-hole. The hood is made from a grain or flour sack, and has 
writing in red and black. The rack is painted with geometric designs 
and dots in yellow, white, red, black, and blue. The rack consists of 
four vertical laths that come to a point at the top and three sets of 
horizontal laths. A set of red dangles hang down from each side of the 
middle set of horizontal slats.
    The tenth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 84676). The cloth hood is black with two small 
perforations for the eyes. A brass button is attached over one eye-
hole. It appears that originally there were two buttons on the mask to 
represent eyes. The rack is painted with geometric and zigzag designs 
in green, red, and black. The rack consists of two short, individual, 
vertical laths with a black zigzag design and two sets of three laths 
with cross pieces and red dangles that jut out diagonally on either 
side. The eleventh Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 84677). The cloth hood is black with two perforations 
for the eyes. A piece of carved shell and a feather is attached in the 
center above the eyes. The rack is trident shaped with one horizontal 
lath, three vertical pieces that come to a point at the end, and two 
stepped laths that are placed on the diagonal between the outer and 
central laths. The rack is painted in red, white, green, and black. 
There is a small hoop attached at the top of both of the outer vertical 
pieces.
    The twelfth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 84680). The cloth hood is black with three small 
perforations for the eyes and mouth. The rack is painted white with a 
black design in the center of the middle vertical section. Cross pieces 
are used on the three vertical sections and on the horizontal lath. A 
set of reddish dangles hang down from each side of the horizontal lath. 
The thirteenth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 84682). The cloth hood is black with three small 
perforations for the eyes and mouth. The hood was made from a grain or 
flour sack. Printed writing in brown or red is visible on the hood. The 
rack consists of one horizontal piece at the base and three vertical 
sections. The central section is shaped like a cross. The outer 
sections have three cross pieces. A set of dangles hang down from each 
side of the horizontal piece. The rack is painted black with a few 
areas at the top of the vertical laths and cross pieces left natural.
    The fourteenth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 84684). The cloth hood is brownish in color. The hood 
was made from a printed grain or flour sack. There is a leaf-type 
pattern design and writing. The rack consists of two connected vertical 
laths with cross pieces and is painted white and black. The fifteenth 
Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack (catalog number 
84687). The cloth hood is black with three small perforations for the 
eyes and mouth. The rack consists of a large central sunburst and two 
sections that are attached toward each side of the hood. The sunburst 
is constructed from a hoop, approximately 8 inches in diameter, with 
numerous small pieces inset through the hoop that resemble rays. A 
narrow lath bisects the center of the hoop. The rack is painted with 
geometric designs in red and blue. A set of red dangles hang down from 
each side of the rack.
    The sixteenth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 84688). The hood is made from a cloth bag and is 
primarily black. The rack consists of a horizontal piece with three 
vertical sections, and is attached with fabric ties to a U-shaped 
support beneath the mask. The central section consists of two pointed 
slats with cross pieces and two sunbursts. The outer sections consist 
of a pointed lath with two sections of shorter laths attached near the 
top and bottom. A set of red dangles hang down from each end of the 
horizontal piece. The rack is painted in geometric designs in red, 
blue, and black. The seventeenth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and 
attached rack (catalog number 84689). The cloth hood is black with 
small perforations for the eyes. A brass button is attached over each 
perforation. The rack consists of three sections. The central section 
consists of four laths that come to a point at the top with laths 
attached at an angle on each side. The outer sections consist of five 
laths set diagonally on the hood that come to a diagonal point at the 
top. A set of red dangles hang down from each outer section. The rack 
is painted with geometric designs in blue, red, and black.
    The eighteenth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 84690). The hood is black with three small perforations 
for the eyes and mouth. A brass button is attached above each 
perforation. The rack consists of a vertical section with a half 
sunburst at top and a horizontal section attached near the hood. The 
rack is painted with geometric designs in red, black, and blue. A set 
of red dangles hang from each side of the horizontal section. The 
nineteenth Gaan mask consists of a cloth hood and attached rack 
(catalog number 84691). The hood appears to be black and gray with blue 
paint or printing beneath the mouth. The rack is in the shape of a 
cross with a circular disc within a hoop at the top. The rack is 
painted white with geometric designs and dots in red and black. A set 
of reddish dangles hang from each side of the horizontal section of the 
cross.
    One singular wand is the shape of a cross (catalog number 84598). 
The wand measures 57 inches x 23 1[sol]4 inches and has a crosspiece 
near the top. It comes to a point at the bottom end and has been 
painted blue, black, yellow, and possibly white and red. There is a

[[Page 48674]]

mortise cut horizontally in the vertical section of wood. The 
crosspiece is set into the mortise and tied with a leather thong. A set 
of four wands is painted in what appears to be yellow, black, and 
possibly blue (catalog number 84599). Each wand comes to a point at one 
end. The tops of the poles are slightly tapered and have a notch cut 
around the wand's circumference.
    A set of two wands includes a small medicine hoop (catalog number 
84656). Both wands taper to a point at one end. One wand is 
approximately 51 inches long and has small wooden hoop, approximately 7 
1[sol]2 inches in diameter, attached by being set into a notch. This 
wand is painted red and yellow, and has blue dots. The hoop is painted 
blue on the interior and has blue dots painted on the exterior. The 
second wand has a notch, but no hoop attached. It is approximately 51 
3[sol]4 inches in length. The central section of wand is 36 inches and 
painted blue. Blue dots are painted on the non-pointed end of the wand. 
A set of two wands is painted with geometric designs and dots in black, 
green, and red (catalog number 84678). A sunburst is attached to the 
center of one of the wands. Both wands come to a point at one end.
    A set of two wands is pointed at one end and painted black on both 
sides (catalog number 84681). One is approximately 27 1[sol]4 inches in 
length and the other is approximately 27 1[sol]2 inches long. Both 
wands have a zigzag line on one side and white dots painted on the 
other side. A set of two wands is blackened on both sides and comes to 
a point at one end (catalog number 84683).
    The first set of medicine hoops includes four hoops (catalog number 
84600). One hoop is approximately 16 inches in diameter and painted 
black. The second hoop is approximately 19 1[sol]4 inches in diameter 
and appears to have been painted white. The third hoop is approximately 
21 1[sol]2 inches in diameter and painted blue. The fourth hoop is 
approximately 22 3[sol]4 inches in diameter and appears to be painted 
yellow. The second set of medicine hoops includes two hoops (catalog 
number 84601). One hoop is approximately 18 3[sol]4 inches in diameter 
and appears yellowish. The second hoop is approximately 21 1[sol]2 
inches in diameter and appears blackened.
    The third set of medicine hoops includes two hoops with worked 
stones attached (catalog number 84604). One hoop is approximately 16 
inches in diameter and has five pieces of worked stone attached with 
sinew at intervals around the hoop. The hoop appears yellow with blue 
dots. The second hoop is approximately 16 1[sol]4 inches in diameter 
and has four worked stones attached with sinew. The fourth set of 
medicine hoops includes two hoops (catalog number 84605). One of the 
hoops is broken. The broken hoop was approximately 21 inches in 
diameter and painted either dark blue or black with red-brown dots. The 
second hoop is approximately 19 1/2 inches in diameter and painted 
black or brown.
    The fifth set of medicine hoops includes two hoops with cross 
pieces (catalog number 84657). One hoop is broken, but was originally 
approximately 20 1[sol]2 inches in diameter. This hoop originally had 
small, carved pieces of wood or yucca in sets of four attached at four 
different points of the hoop. Several pieces, however, are broken or 
missing. Most of the carved pieces are painted blue, but one appears 
red. The hoop may have been painted, but the color is unclear. The 
second medicine hoop is approximately 15 3[sol]4 inches in diameter and 
appears to have been painted blue. This hoop has pieces of carved wood 
in sets of four attached at four different points of the hoop. The 
pieces appear to be painted blue and are approximately 3 3/4 inches in 
length. A few of the carved wooden pieces are broken or missing. The 
sixth set of medicine hoops includes four small hoops with feathers 
attached (catalog number 84667). One hoop is painted white, the second 
appears to be partially painted blue, the third appears to be painted 
yellow, and the fourth appears to be painted red.
    The bullroarer is painted with zigzag lines in black and red 
(catalog number 84679). A string is attached at the narrow end of the 
bullroarer and is wrapped loosely around it.
    The medicine string is attached to a painted buckskin bag with a 
worn cloth covering and a cross within it (catalog number 84722). Two 
brass buttons are attached to a flap with corresponding holes in the 
flap to close the bag. The buckskin bag contained a cross and worn 
piece of cloth. The medicine string has blue glass and white stone or 
glass beads attached at intervals. The bag is rectangular and consists 
of buckskin folded over like an envelope or wallet. There are zigzag 
and geometric designs painted on the outside of the bag in blue, 
yellow, and red. At the center of the flap there is a rectangular piece 
of (abalone) shell with a feather attached. The worn, printed, cotton 
cloth appears stained and has several holes. The cross consists of two 
pieces of wood and is approximately 5 3[sol]4 inches x 3 1[sol]2 
inches. It is painted in geometric designs in yellow, blue, and red. At 
the top of the cross there appears to be a depiction of a person's face 
with a crown and a depiction of the figure's arms on the horizontal of 
the cross. A white feather and shell are attached at the center of the 
cross.
    These cultural items were purchased for the Field Museum by Charles 
L. Owen during two Field Columbian Museum expeditions to the White 
Mountain Apache Reservation in 1901 and in 1903. The museum accessioned 
the items into its collection in the same year they were collected.
    The cultural affiliation of the cultural items is White Mountain 
Apache as indicated by museum records and consultation evidence 
presented by the White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache 
Reservation, Arizona. Most of the cultural items are identified as 
coming from the White Mountain Apache Reservation. In other cases, the 
cultural items are identified as coming from the White River Agency, 
the North Fork of the White River, or the East Fork of the White River, 
which are located on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation White Mountain 
Apache Trust Lands.
    Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001, the 56 cultural items meet the 
definition of cultural items and are subject to repatriation under 
NAGPRA. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the cultural items and the White Mountain Apache Tribe of the 
Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the cultural items should contact 
Jonathan Haas, MacArthur Curator of North American Anthropology, Field 
Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 
60605, telephone (312) 665-7829, before September 24, 2007. 
Repatriation of the cultural items to the White Mountain Apache Tribe 
of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona may proceed after that date if 
no additional claimants come forward.
    The Field Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying 
the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, Arizona; 
Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New 
Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New 
Mexico; San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; 
Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort 
Apache

[[Page 48675]]

Reservation, Arizona; and Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde 
Indian Reservation, Arizona that this notice has been published.

    Dated: August 8, 2007.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-16774 Filed 8-23-07; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4312-50-S



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