FR Doc E6-18476
[Federal Register: November 2, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 212)]
[Notices]               
[Page 64558]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr02no06-66]                         


[[Page 64558]]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Southwest Museum 
of the American Indian, Autry National Center, Los Angeles, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Southwest Museum 
of the American Indian, Autry National Center, Los Angeles, CA, that 
meet the definition of ``sacred objects'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    The 14 cultural items are 8 katsina kwatsi (masks), 5 wooden war 
gods, and 1 flute altar.
    In 1960, the Southwest Museum purchased seven katsina kwatsi 
(masks) from Mr. Andrew T. Johnston with financial assistance provided 
by the Southwest Museum Acquisition Fund. According to museum 
documentation, Mr. Johnston acquired all seven masks from Old Oraibi, 
AZ. No further information has been found to clarify means of 
acquisition by the donor. The seven katsina kwatsi are one Tasaf, one 
Koyemsi, one Piftuka, one Cohnina, one Angakchina, and one Heotos.
    On May 10, 1934, the Southwest Museum acquired one katsina mask 
from Miss Rose Dougan. Museum records identify the cultural item as an 
``old Hopi bearded mask.'' No further information has been found to 
clarify means or location of acquisition by the donor. The katsina 
kwatsi is an Angakchina.
    On March 8, 1941, the Southwest Museum acquired five wooden war 
gods or prayer effigies from Mrs. Ina Sizer Cassidy. According to donor 
correspondence, the ``Old Prayer effigies'' were found in 1920 by Mrs. 
Cassidy's husband, Gerald Cassidy, at a war gods' shrine near Old 
Oraibi, AZ, during Snake Dance ceremonies.
    On June 28, 1950, the Southwest Museum purchased one flute altar 
from Mr. William Neil Smith with financial assistance provided by the 
General Charles McCormack Reeve Fund. According to museum 
documentation, Mr. Smith acquired the altar in Old Oraibi, AZ. No 
further information has been found to clarify means of acquisition by 
the donor.
    Museum documentation indicates that the 14 cultural items 
originated from Old Oraibi, which is located within the Hopi 
Reservation. Archeological and ethnographic evidence suggests that the 
Hopi have continuously inhabited the Old Oraibi since A.D. 1150. In 
1900, Old Oraibi was the largest Hopi settlement.
    Consultation and physical inspection of the cultural items 
described above by the knowledgeable traditional cultural authorities 
of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona, the Katsinmomngwit (Kachina Priest) and 
Lenmomngwit (Flute Priest), have identified the cultural items as 
culturally affiliated with the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. According to the 
traditional cultural authorities, the cultural items have ongoing 
historical, traditional, and cultural importance to the Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona. As part of continuing religious practice, the cultural items 
must be cared for by current members of the Kachina and Flute Societies 
of the Hopi.
    Officials of the Southwest Museum have determined that, pursuant to 
25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(C), the 14 cultural items described above are 
specific ceremonial objects needed by traditional Native American 
religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American 
religions by their present-day adherents. Officials of the Southwest 
Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there 
is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the 14 sacred objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the sacred objects should contact Dr. 
Duane H. King, Executive Director, or Jamie Hebert, NAGPRA Research 
Associate for Collections, Southwest Museum of the American Indian, 
Autry National Center, 234 Museum Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90065, 
telephone (323) 221-2164 extension 241, before December 4, 2006. 
Repatriation of the 14 sacred objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Southwest Museum is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 28, 2006
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E6-18476 Filed 11-1-06; 8:45 am]

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