[Federal Register: March 2, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 40)]
[Notices]
[Page 10161-10162]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr02mr99-65]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items in the Possession
of the Arizona State Museum, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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[[Page 10162]]

    Notice is hereby given under the Native American Graves Protection
and Repatriation Act, 43 CFR 10.10 (a)(3), of the intent to repatriate
cultural items in the possession of the Arizona State Museum (ASM)
which meet the definition of ``object of cultural patrimony'' under
Section 2 of the Act.
    The cultural items consist of 38 Chapayeka masks (hiisam)
constructed of hide, papaer, and paint and 12 Chapayeka spears, swords,
and daggers constructed of wood and paint.
    In 1932, one Chapayeka mask was purchased by the Arizona State
Museum at Old Pascua. In 1939, one mask and one sword were donated to
ASM by Mrs. Josephine Shelby of Sahuarita, AZ. In 1942, one spear was
collected by Edward Spicer in Huirivis, Sonora, Mexico. Between 1969-
1971, 16 masks were obtained by ASM through Richey Elementary School,
Tucson, AZ. Around 1970, three masks were made by an unknown person for
use in a School Loan Kit program. In 1976, three masks were purchased
by ASM from Tom Bahti Indian Arts, Tucson, AZ. During 1980-1982, eleven
masks, one spear, six swords, and three daggers were donated to ASM by
William Hawes Smith. At unknown dates, two masks were purchased by ASM
from the maker; and one mask was collected by Donna Laney and
Candelaria Carvajal at Loma de Guamuchil, Sonora, Mexico.
    Museum documentation and consultation with representatives of the
Pascua Yaqui Tribe indicate that these cultural items are Pascua Yaqui.
The two Sonoran cultural items are being claimed by the Pascua Yaqui
Tribe on behalf of the Sonoran Yaqui communities. These cultural items
have been identified as consistent with known ceremonial and sacred
items as recorded in ethnographic sources. Representatives of the
Pascua Yaqui Tribe have also identified these cultural items as having
ongoing traditional and cultural importance central to the tribe
itself, and could not have been alienated by any individual.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the Arizona
State Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(4),
these 50 cultural items have ongoing historical, traditional, and
cultural importance central to the culture itself, and could not have
been alienated, appropriated, or conveyed by any individual. Officials
of the Arizona State Museum have also determined that, pursuant to 43
CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity which
can be reasonably traced between these items and the Pascua Yaqui
Tribe.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe.
Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be
culturally affiliated with these objects should contact Alyce Sadongei,
American Indian Programs Coordinator, Arizona State Museum, University
of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721; telephone: (520) 621-4609 before April 1,
1999. Repatriation of these objects to the Pascua Yaqui Tribe may begin
after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: February 24, 1999.
Veletta Canouts,
Acting Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Deputy Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 99-5096 Filed 3-1-99; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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