[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 23 (Tuesday, February 4, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 6626-6628]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-02349]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-14641; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: The Field Museum of Natural 
History, Chicago, IL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Field Museum of Natural History has completed an inventory 
of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with 
the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes 
or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives 
of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in 
this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human 
remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request 
to the Field Museum of Natural History. If no additional requestors 
come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the Field Museum of Natural History at the 
address in this notice by March 6, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Helen Robbins, Repatriation Director, Field Museum of 
Natural History, 1400 S. Lake Shore Dr., Chicago, IL 60605, telephone 
(312) 665-7317, email hrobbins@fieldmuseum.org.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Field Museum of 
Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from the Dumaw Creek site in Oceana County, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by the Field Museum of Natural History (Field Museum) 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the 
Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad

[[Page 6627]]

River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; 
Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana; Citizen 
Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County 
Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and 
Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Ho-
Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; 
Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the 
Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte 
Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du 
Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac de Flambeau 
Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, 
Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-
be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Menominee 
Indian Tribe of Wisconsin; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Minnesota Chippewa 
Tribe, Minnesota (Six component reservations: Bois Fort Band (Nett 
Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille 
Lacs Band; White Earth Band); Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi, 
Michigan (previously listed as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Oneida 
Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe 
of Indians of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan 
and Indiana; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the 
Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Red Cliff Band of Lake 
Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa 
Indians, Minnesota; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and 
Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Tribe of the 
Mississippi in Iowa; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault 
Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Seneca Nation of 
Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-
Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Shawnee Tribe; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, 
Wisconsin; Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa 
Indians of Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as 
the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); Turtle Mountain Band 
of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the Wyandotte Nation; as well 
as the Burt Lake Band of Odawa and Chippewa Indians and the Grand River 
Band of Ottawa Indians, non-Federally recognized Indian groups. 
Hereafter, all tribes and groups listed in this section are referred to 
as ``The Consulting Tribes and Indian Groups.''

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1915 and 1916, human remains representing, at minimum, 42 
individuals were removed from the Dumaw Creek site in Oceana County, 
MI, by a local farmer, Carl Schrumpf. Mr. Schrumpf sold his collection 
to Mr. H. E. Sargent of Grand Rapids, MI, who, in turn, sold a large 
portion of the collection to Mr. Charles Nelson in the late 1920s or 
early 1930s. The Field Museum's Department of Zoology purchased this 
material in 1958 from the estate of Mr. Charles Nelson. The collection 
was transferred from Zoology to the Anthropology Department in March 
1959.
    Of the 42 individuals, three individuals were children, four were 
juveniles, one was a young adult of unknown sex, three were young adult 
females, two were young adult males, ten were adults of unknown sex, 
one was a middle-aged female, and one was a middle-aged male. One young 
adult, one middle aged individual, and two older adults probably were 
males. One individual of indeterminate age, one individual of middle 
age, and one individual of middle- to old-aged were possibly male. One 
juvenile or young adult, two young adults, one late early adult to 
middle-aged adult, one middle-aged individual, one middle- to old-aged 
adult, and one older adult were possibly female. One young adult was 
probably female. One individual was of indeterminate age and sex, and 
one other may have been either a juvenile or an adult. It is possible 
that some of the elements representing individuals may belong to the 
same individual, but this could not be determined definitively by Field 
Museum staff. No known individuals were identified.
    The 83 catalog numbers containing associated funerary objects are 1 
woven bag of buffalo hair; 1 lot of bag fragments; 1 bag of weasel 
skin; 1 leather bag or pouch; 1 lot of braided leather thongs; 1 lot of 
leather bag parts; 1 piece of leather; 1 woven bag of beaver skin; 2 
fragments of beaver skin; 1 section of elk skin and hair; 1 section of 
black bear skin and hair; 1 fragment of raccoon skin; 1 lot of copper 
hair ornaments; 1 hair plaque fragment; 1 lot of bead fragments; 1 part 
of a headdress; 1 lot of copper hair beads; 4 lots of hair pipes; 4 
lots of projectile points; 7 lots of knives; 1 lot of beads on a thong; 
1 part of a bear skin; 1 lot of thong fragments; 1 lot of cord 
fragments; 1 lot of leather and thongs; 1 lot of braided grass; 1 lot 
of wood fragments; 1 mussel shell; 1 wooden shaft fragment; 1 thorn; 1 
lot of pumpkin seeds; 1 box of bag remnants; 1 lot of hawk beak 
culmens; 1 lot of bird tail fragments; 1 box of leaf fragments; 1 seed; 
1 bone bead; 1 shell bead; 2 celts; 1 tinkling cone; 1 lot of animal 
skin fragments from the above animals; 2 awls; 1 spear; 1 lot of beaver 
incisors; 17 lots of beads; 1 lot of small shell beads; 1 lump of 
ochre; 1 lot of shell pendants; 1 lot of effigy pendants; 1 pendant; 1 
lot of grass fragments; and 1 box of powdered ochre.
    In 1960, the Field Museum accessioned material as the result of an 
exchange with the Wright L. Coffinberry Chapter of the Michigan 
Archaeological Society. This exchange was initiated by Field Museum 
curator George Quimby. Quimby wrote that this material was directly 
traceable to the dealer H.E. Sargent, who had bought the material from 
Mr. Schrumpf. The two associated funerary objects are globular vessels 
recorded as originally having been found in a burial context.
    In 1961, the Field Museum accessioned lithic material collected by 
Quimby that included material from a Mr. Seymour Rider. Quimby reported 
that Mr. Rider collected at the site following Schrumpf. It is likely 
that Quimby made this purchase on behalf of the Field Museum, as it is 
known that he visited and examined Mr. Rider's collection in the 1960s. 
The five associated funerary objects accessioned are granite-tempered 
tan and gray rim sherds that Quimby reported as originally having been 
removed from graves at the Dumaw Creek site in 1916.
    George Quimby conducted research on the Dumaw Creek site in the 
1960s, which included visiting the site. Quimby determined that the 
Dumaw Creek site was the location from which the Native American human 
remains and associated funerary objects listed in the notice were 
removed. He determined that the site was both a village and burial 
ground dating to the early 17th century (he settled on the window of 
1605 to 1620 in his 1966 Fieldiana report, The Dumaw Creek site: a 
seventeenth century prehistoric Indian village and cemetery in Oceana 
County, Michigan). Field Museum staff has relied on this date for the 
purposes of assessing cultural affiliation. Quimby and other 
researchers have characterized the lower peninsula of Michigan at the 
time as a zone between Iroquois tribes of the east and Algonquian 
tribes in eastern Wisconsin (including the Potawatomi, Kickapoo, Sauk, 
Fox, Menominee, Mascouten, and

[[Page 6628]]

Miami). Other texts, such as the Handbook of North American Indians, 
place the Potawatomi's ``protohistoric estate'' in the lower peninsula 
of Michigan, west and north of, but adjacent to, Central Algonquian 
groups like the Kickapoo, Sauk, Fox, and Mascouten. O'Gorman and Lovis 
write that the Potawatomi entered the area around Lake Michigan fairly 
late in prehistoric times, and that they came to an area which held 
other groups from about the 1400s to the early 1600s--groups that 
others, through linguistic and ethnohistoric information, have 
determined to be the Kickapoo, Sauk, Fox, and Mascouten. Quimby also 
considered there to be similarity between the burial assemblage--such 
as a twined bag--and bags made in the 19th century by some of these 
tribes. This information contributes to a largely agreed-upon oral 
tradition and belief, as well as accepted historical and archeological 
information, that a splitting of groups occurred around the Straits of 
Mackinac by the late 16th century, with the Ottawa/Odawa remaining in 
this area, the Chippewa/Ojibwe heading west and north, and the group(s) 
now known as the Potawatomi heading south. Further research and final 
consultation with Potawatomi, Kickapoo, Sauk, Fox, Menominee, 
Mascouten, and Miami tribes resulted in the Field Museum's 
determination that it is reasonable to conclude that the cultural 
affiliation of the human remains and cultural items listed in this 
notice lies with the descendant tribes listed in the following section.

Determinations Made by the Field Museum

    Officials of the Field Museum have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 42 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 90 catalog numbers 
representing the objects described in this notice are reasonably 
believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at 
the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity can be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and the Forest County 
Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, 
Michigan; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of 
Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of 
Michigan; Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as 
the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; 
Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and the 
Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band 
of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas).

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Helen Robbins, The Field Museum of Natural 
History, 1400 S. Lake Shore Dr., Chicago, IL 60605, telephone (312) 
665-7317, email hrobbins@fieldmuseum.org, by March 6, 2014. After that 
date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian 
Community, Michigan; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo 
Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe 
of Oklahoma; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of 
Michigan; Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as 
the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; 
Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and the 
Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band 
of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas) may proceed.
    The Field Museum is responsible for notifying The Consulting Tribes 
and Indian Groups that this notice has been published.

    Dated: December 23, 2013.
Melanie O'Brien,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2014-02349 Filed 2-3-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P


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