[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 11 (Thursday, January 16, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 2868-2871]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-00781]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-14599; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of 
Wisconsin, Madison, WI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The State Historical Society of Wisconsin (WHS) has completed 
an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in 
consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation 
between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any 
present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. 
Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request to the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. If no 
additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human 
remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to the State Historical Society of Wisconsin at the address 
in this notice by February 18, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Jennifer Kolb, Wisconsin Historical Museum, 30 North Carroll 
Street, Madison, WI 53703, telephone (608) 261-2461, email 
Jennifer.Kolb@wisconsinhistory.org.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the State Historical 
Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI. The human remains and

[[Page 2869]]

associated funerary objects were removed from multiple sites in Dane 
County, WI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the State 
Historical Society of Wisconsin professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; 
Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; and the Menominee Indian Tribe of 
Wisconsin.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1931, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
(1996.93.2) were removed from the Outlet Site (47-DA-0003) in Dane 
County, WI. Road construction cut into Mound 5 on the site, disturbing 
a burial. Charles E. Brown, founder of the Wisconsin Archeological 
Society and director of the State Historical Society, excavated the 
mound and discovered two more burials. All three burials were described 
as bundle burials. The remains were determined to be those of two adult 
males and one adult female. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1934, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(A12808) were removed from the Outlet Site (47-DA-0003) in Dane County, 
WI. The remains were discovered in 1933 by the owner of the property 
while digging for a septic tank and were subsequently excavated by 
Charles E. Brown in 1934. The remains were determined to be those of an 
adult, possibly male. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1935, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
(A12844) were removed from the Yahara Hoyt Site (47-DA-0026) in Dane 
County, WI. The remains were discovered in an oval mound by members of 
the Wisconsin Outers Association of Madison and excavated under the 
direction of Charles E. Brown. The remains were determined to be those 
of three adults--one female, one male, and one individual of 
indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(HP.DA-0029.1) were removed from the Koshkonong Mound Group (47-DA-
0029) in Dane County, WI. The remains were disturbed during excavation 
for a house foundation. State Historical Society of Wisconsin staff 
investigated and discovered that a mound was being disturbed. The 
burial was discovered in backfill dirt, meaning the primary location of 
the burial within the mound could not be determined. The remains were 
determined to be those of an adult male. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
(F1996.21.1 and F1996.21.2) were removed from the Olson Site (47-DA-
0089) in Dane County, WI. The remains were excavated by a WHS 
archeological crew from two sub-floor burial pits in a partially 
destroyed conical mound. They were determined to be those of an adult, 
possibly female, and a child of indeterminate sex. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1934, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(H13016) were removed from the Fuller Woods Mound Group (47-DA-0118) in 
Dane County, WI. The remains were excavated by a WHS archeological crew 
from a partially disturbed linear mound. The archeologists recovered 
numerous cranial fragments from a burial located beneath an ash pit 
that were determined to be from an adult of indeterminate sex. No known 
individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a 
partially reconstructed grit-tempered pottery vessel (1982.46.1.1-.97).
    In 1935, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(A12843 and A12843.1) were removed from the Willow Drive Mounds (47-DA-
0119) in Dane County, WI. The remains were excavated from a bird effigy 
mound on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus by Charles E. 
Brown. Three mandible fragments were loaned to the University of 
Wisconsin-Madison Anthropology Department at an unknown time and 
returned to the WHS in 2011. The remains were determined to be those of 
a young adult male. No known individuals were identified. The one 
associated funerary object is a single fragmentary coyote mandible 
(1950.1627).
    In 1937, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(A12957) were removed from the Willow Drive Mounds (47-DA-0119) in Dane 
County, WI. The remains were excavated from a linear mound on the 
University of Wisconsin-Madison campus by Charles E. Brown. They were 
determined to be those of a young adult male. No known individuals were 
identified. The one associated funerary object is the fragmentary 
remains of a red fox (1984.16).
    In 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
(1996.93.4 and 1996.93.5) were removed from the Picnic Point Mound 
Group (47-DA-0121) in Dane County, WI. The remains were discovered and 
excavated by a Works Progress Administration (WPA) mound repair crew 
and Charles E. Brown. They were determined to be those of an adult 
female, an adult male, and a young adult female. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum 78 individuals 
(1986.417.1--1986.417.15) were removed from the Mendota Beach Mound 
Group (47-DA-0129). The remains were removed by WHS archeologist John 
Halsey from three conical mounds, which have since been destroyed. The 
remains were determined to be those of 30 subadults, 23 adult males, 11 
adult females, and 14 adults of indeterminate sex. No known individuals 
were identified. The three associated funerary objects are a group of 
chert flakes (1986.417.42), a chert biface fragment (1986.417.43), and 
a group of faunal bones (1986.417.44).
    In 1915, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(A02522 and 2011.115.11) were removed from the Dividing Ridge Mound 
Group (47-DA-0145) in Dane County, WI. The remains were discovered 
during the destruction of a linear mound above the Pieh gravel pit on 
the Lake Wingra Ridge. WHS archeologist Marion Cranefield was on site 
when a construction worker discovered the remains and assisted in the 
excavation. A portion of the remains were loaned to the University of 
Wisconsin-Madison Anthropology Department in 1967 and returned to the 
WHS in 2011. They were determined to be those of an adult male. No 
known individuals were identified. The associated funerary object is a 
wood fragment (2011.115.11.1).
    In 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
(A12982) were removed from the Edgewood Mound Group (47-DA-0147) in 
Dane County, WI. A WPA work group working to repair mounds in Madison 
found a human bone in a conical mound. Charles E. Brown excavated and 
discovered two burials in the mound floor. The remains were determined 
to

[[Page 2870]]

be those of an adult male and an adult female. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals (F2013.199.1) were removed from the Arboretum Woods site 
(47-DA-0152) in Dane County, WI. The remains were excavated from a 
conical mound in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum. They 
were determined to be those of an adult male and a sub-adult of 
indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1922, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals 
(1996.93.8) were removed from the Mendota Beach site (47-DA-0172) in 
Dane County, WI. The five burials were disturbed during excavation for 
a barn on land belonging to Magnus Swenson. Either Swenson or David 
Atwood donated the remains to the WHS the same year. The remains were 
determined to be those of five individuals--three elderly adults, one 
adult, and one juvenile--all of indeterminate sex. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1991, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(HP.DA-0237.1) were removed from the Springdale Mound Group (47-DA-
0237) in Dane County, WI. The WHS was notified that a proposed 
Wisconsin Department of Transportation frontage road was going to be 
constructed through an area where an Indian mound once existed, 
possibly disturbing any burials that could remain. Staff monitored 
machine-stripping of the area to look for evidence of intact burials, 
and a small concentration of human bone was discovered and excavated. 
The remains were determined to be from an adult, possibly female. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1929, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
(1950.1624) were removed from the Farwell's Point Mound Group (47-DA-
0255) in Dane County, WI. The remains were excavated by Charles E. 
Brown from a small conical mound. They were determined to be those of 
an adult and juvenile, both of indeterminate sex. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(1952.339) were removed from the Farwell's Point Mound Group (47-DA-
0255) in Dane County, WI. A femur fragment was discovered by WHS 
archeologists during the excavation of a mound adjacent to the 
superintendent's residence at Mendota State Hospital. The mound had 
been disturbed in the recent past and an attempt had been made to 
restore it. The femur fragment was found in the disturbed area, 
suggesting that the burial had been destroyed by this disturbance. It 
was determined that the fragment was from a young adult of 
indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (1969A.42.104-.109) were removed from the Farwell's Point 
Mound Group (47-DA-0255) in Dane County, WI. The remains were uncovered 
and donated to the WHS by Charles E. Brown. Neither sex nor age could 
be determined for the remains. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(1987.33.3) were removed from the Morris Park Mound Group (47-DA-0267) 
in Dane County, WI. An excavation of the site was conducted by Victoria 
Dirst of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Parks 
and Recreation in preparation for a road construction project. When the 
site was originally mapped in 1902, it contained six conical mounds, 
three panther effigy mounds, and two linear mounds. At the time of 
excavation, four of these mounds had been largely destroyed, but seven 
were still intact. The partially cremated remains were excavated from 
pit feature 3, located about 10 meters from Mound 1. The remains and 
associated funerary objects were given to the WHS in 1987 as part of a 
cooperative agreement between the Wisconsin Department of Natural 
Resources and the WHS. Neither sex nor age could be determined for the 
remains. No known individuals were identified. The one associated 
funerary object consists of a group of chert fragments (1987.33.3.1).
    In 1928, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(A10120) were removed from the Crystal Lake Burials and Village site 
(47-DA-0335) in Dane County, WI. The remains were discovered by a road 
crew while excavating gravel. The burial was removed and reported to 
Sheriff Fred Finn, who gave the remains to the WHS. The remains were 
determined to be those of an adult male. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1929, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
(A12857) were removed from the Crystal Lake Burials and Village site 
(47-DA-0335) in Dane County, WI. The remains were discovered by a road 
crew while plowing the crest of a hill to excavate gravel. They 
notified the WHS of their discovery, and Charles E. Brown excavated the 
burials. Brown donated the remains to the WHS in 1935. The remains were 
determined to be those of an adult male, an adult female, and a fetus 
of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 
associated funerary objects are a group of chert flakes and a 
fragmentary turtle carapace (A12857.1 and A12857.2).
    In 1932, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
(F1996.22.1) were removed from the Mendota Beach Burials site (47-DA-
0382) in Dane County, WI. The burials were disturbed during road 
construction and were located about 300 feet from one another. One of 
the burials had previously been partially disturbed by digging for a 
flower bed on the neighboring property. William F. Wagner donated the 
remains to the WHS the same year. The remains were determined to be 
those of two adults, possibly a male and a female. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1954, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(1956.9) were removed from the Mendota Hills Bird Effigy site (47-DA-
0409) in Dane County, WI. The remains were discovered during the 
mapping and partial excavation of a bird effigy mound by WHS 
archeologist Warren Wittry and a group of University of Wisconsin-
Madison archeology graduate students. WHS was notified of the mound by 
a construction company after a bulldozer partially destroyed it during 
construction of the Mendota Hills Subdivision. During excavation, it 
was determined that the site had recently been looted, but the looters 
had not disturbed the burial pit. The remains were determined to be 
those of a child of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1929, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(F2008.42.1) were removed from the Woodward Shores Mound Group (47-DA-
0530) in Dane County, WI. The remains were discovered when a bird 
effigy mound was dug into during construction of a home. The 
landowners, Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Harper, had been told to watch for 
burials as they dug into the mound and excavated the remains before 
continuing with the construction project. Three burials were found, but 
two of the burials were in a very poor state of preservation and were 
not saved by the

[[Page 2871]]

excavators. Mrs. Harper contacted Charles E. Brown concerning the 
discovery and the remains were given to the WHS. The remains were 
determined to be those of an adult male. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(1994.113.53) were removed from the Camp Indianola site (47-DA-0533) in 
Dane County, WI. Archeologist Victoria Dirst discovered the burial 
during an excavation of the site for the Department of Natural 
Resources, who transferred them to the WHS as part of cooperative 
agreement. The remains were determined to be those of an adult female. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    In 1915, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(1950.1225) were removed from the Nichols Mortuary Site (47-DA-1284) in 
Dane County, WI. William McClean uncovered two burials while plowing 
near the Yahara River Bank at the Nichols farm. McClean donated only a 
lumbar vertebra with a projectile point embedded in it, and none of the 
other human remains, to the WHS in 1917. The projectile point was 
recorded at the time of donation but was not present during re-
cataloging in 1950. The vertebra was determined to be from an adult. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1954, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
(1956.23.1) were removed from the Nichols Mortuary Site (47-DA-1284) in 
Dane County, WI. The remains were excavated from Mound 2 by WHS 
archeologist Warren Wittry. The mound was excavated because it was 
being destroyed by a construction project. The remains were determined 
to be those of an adult female and an individual of indeterminate age 
and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In 1995, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(HP.DA-1395.1) were removed from the Birmingham's Knee Site (47-DA-
1395) in Dane County, WI. A femoral condyle fragment was discovered by 
then state archeologist Bob Birmingham eroding out of tree roots along 
the lakeshore. No other skeletal material was recovered. The bone 
fragment was determined to be from an adult of indeterminate sex. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1900, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals 
(A00031 and A02580.1) were removed from a gravel pit at an unknown site 
along Oregon Road in South Madison, Dane County, WI. Mr. Absalom Van 
Deusen donated the remains to the WHS that same year. The remains were 
loaned to the University of Wisconsin-Madison Anthropology Department 
in 1949 and returned to the WHS in 2011. The remains were determined to 
be those of three adult males, one juvenile female, and two adults of 
indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
(2011.115.3) were removed from an unknown site on the west end of 
Mendota Beach, in Dane County, WI. The remains were discovered by the 
landowner, Mr. F.W. Burton, while digging a cellar for his home. Burton 
contacted Charles E. Brown, who excavated the remains. At an unknown 
date, the remains were loaned to the University of Wisconsin-Madison 
Anthropology Department and were returned to the WHS in 2011. The 
remains were determined to be those of two adult males and one adult of 
indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.

Determinations Made by the State Historical Society of Wisconsin

    Officials of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on WHS records, discovery 
location and context of burial sites, the reported presence of funerary 
objects in some instances, and skeletal analysis in some instances.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 132 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the ten objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed is the aboriginal land of the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin.
     Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate 
that the land from which the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the 
Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects may be to the Ho-Chunk 
Nation of Wisconsin.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Jennifer 
Kolb, Wisconsin Historical Museum, 30 North Carroll Street, Madison, WI 
53703, telephone (608) 261-2461, email 
Jennifer.Kolb@wisconsinhistory.org, by February 18, 2014. After that 
date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Ho-
Chunk Nation of Wisconsin may proceed.
    The State Historical Society of Wisconsin is responsible for 
notifying the Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; the Ho-
Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; and the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: December 2, 2013.
Melanie O'Brien,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2014-00781 Filed 1-15-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P


Back to the top