[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 16 (Thursday, January 24, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 5202-5203]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-01347]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-11961; 2200-1100-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas State University Museum, 
Jonesboro, AR

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Arkansas State University Museum has completed an 
inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian 
tribes, and has determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there 
is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and a present-day 
Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself 
to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the 
Arkansas State University Museum. Repatriation of the human remains to 
the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come 
forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Arkansas 
State University Museum at the address below by February 25, 2013.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Marti Allen, Director, Arkansas State University Museum, 
P.O. Box 490, State University, Jonesboro, AR 72467, telephone (870) 
972-2074.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of Arkansas State University Museum, Jonesboro, AR. The 
human remains were removed from the St. Francis River Valley region in 
Cross and Poinsett counties, AR.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Arkansas 
State University Museum and Arkansas Archaeological Survey professional 
staffs in consultation with representatives of the Quapaw Tribe of 
Indians and The Osage Nation.

History and Description of the Remains

    Sometime prior to 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from an unknown location, most likely in 
Poinsett County, AR. In June 1977, the human remains were donated by 
Mr. Curtis Noble of Poinsett County, AR, to the Arkansas State 
University Museum. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary items are present. The remains were donated by Mr. Curtis 
Noble as part of his procured collection. The donation record states 
the collection contains ``objects [Noble] collected, mostly from 
Poinsett County, over a 40 year period.'' Although the specific 
location of removal is unknown, museum officials reasonably believe 
that the remains were removed from Poinsett County.
    In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from the Cherry Valley Mounds (site 3CS40), in Cross 
County, AR, by Dr. Eugene Wittlake of Arkansas State University. The 
remains were subsequently donated to the Arkansas State University 
Museum in November of 1958. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present. Situated on the west side of 
Crowley's Ridge, the site consisted of four mounds numbered one through 
four and was originally excavated by the Gilcrease Institute of 
Oklahoma. Dr. Wittlake was given permission by the Gilcrease Institute 
to excavate only at mound number four. Non-funerary artifacts removed 
from the site date the human remains to the Mississippian Period (A.D. 
1050-1400).
    Between 1957 and 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, four 
individuals were removed from the Walnut Mound (site 3PO57), in 
Poinsett County, AR, by Dr. Eugene Wittlake of Arkansas State 
University. The human remains were subsequently donated to the Arkansas 
State University Museum

[[Page 5203]]

in 1958. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present. The site contained a mound, about 40 feet in 
diameter and three feet in height, located in a swamp south of Hood 
Lake and north of Weiner in Poinsett County, AR. Archeological evidence 
shows that an Archaic village stratum (2000-1000 B.C.), was covered by 
a Late Baytown burial mound during the Late Woodland Period (A.D. 400-
700). The four individuals were discovered in this burial mound. Early 
Mississippian (A.D. 700-900) occupation of the site is also attested by 
the presence of shell tempered ceramic sherds.
    Between 1959 and 1964, human remains representing, at minimum, 103 
individuals were removed from Ballard Mound (site 3PO115), in Poinsett 
County, AR by Dr. Eugene Wittlake of Arkansas State University. The 
remains were subsequently donated to the Arkansas State University 
Museum later that same year. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present. Ballard Mound was excavated 
between 1959 and 1964 by Dr. Wittlake. Non-funerary artifacts removed 
from the site date the human remains to the Cherry Valley Phase of the 
Early Mississippian Period (A.D. 1050-1150).
    Sometime between 1956 and 1960, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 16 individuals were removed from the McDuffee site (3CG21), in 
Craighead County, AR, by unknown individuals. The remains were 
subsequently donated to the Arkansas State University Museum between 
1956 and 1960. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present. Excavation records for this site from the 
Gilcrease Museum in Oklahoma show that the site consisted of a ``large 
village with two mounds.'' Non-funerary artifacts removed from the site 
date the human remains to the Middle Mississippian Period (A.D. 1170-
1300).
    Sometime prior to 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 14 
individuals were removed from the Huber Site, in Poinsett County, AR, 
by unknown individuals. The remains were subsequently donated to the 
Arkansas State University Museum in September of 1957. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present. Although no excavation records exist for this site, 
discussions with a descendant of the site owner suggest that there were 
at least four mounds on the property. All four mounds have now been 
land leveled. Non-funerary artifacts removed from the site date the 
human remains to the Mississippian Period (A.D. 900-1500).
    Sometime prior to 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from the Judd Hill Plantation site, in Poinsett 
County, AR, by Dr. Eugene Wittlake of Arkansas State University. The 
remains were subsequently donated to the Arkansas State University 
Museum in July of 1961. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present. Non-funerary artifacts removed 
from the site date the human remains anywhere from the Middle Woodland 
Period (A.D. 1-500) to the Middle Mississippian Period (A.D. 1170-
1300).
    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from the Miller site (3PO24), in Poinsett County, AR, by 
Dr. Eugene Wittlake of Arkansas State Unviersity. The remains were 
subsequently donated to the Arkansas State University Museum in 
November of 1957. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present. Non-funerary artifacts removed from the 
site date the human remains to the Mississippian Period (A.D. 1050-

1400).
    Oral history evidence presented by representatives of the Quapaw 
Tribe of Indians indicates that the St. Francis River Valley region, 
which includes Cross and Poinsett counties, has long been included in 
the traditional and hunting territory of the Quapaw. French colonial 
records (A.D. 1700) also indicate that the Quapaw were known to be the 
only Native American group present at that time in the St. Francis 
River valley region.

Determinations Made by the Arkansas State University Museum

    Officials of the Arkansas State University Museum have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of a minimum of 145 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Marti Allen, Director, Arkansas State University Museum, P.O. Box 490, 
State University, Jonesboro, AR 72467, telephone (870)-972-2074, before 
February 25, 2013. Repatriation of the human remains to the Quapaw 
Tribe of Indians may proceed after that date if no additional claimants 
come forward.
    The Arkansas State University Museum is responsible for notifying 
the Quapaw Tribe of Indians and The Osage Nation that this notice has 
been published.

    Dated: December 18, 2012.
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2013-01347 Filed 1-23-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P

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