[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 8 (Friday, January 11, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Page 2436]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov ]
[FR Doc No: 2013-00446]



[[Page 2436]]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-11886; 2200-1100-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Illinois State Museum, 
Springfield, IL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Illinois State Museum has completed an inventory of human 
remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has 
determined that there is a likely cultural affiliation between the 
human remains and present-day Indian tribes. Representatives of any 
Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the 
human remains may contact the Illinois State Museum. Repatriation of 
the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no 
additional claimants come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Illinois 
State Museum at the address below by February 11, 2013.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Robert E. Warren, Curator of Anthropology, Illinois 
State Museum, 1011 East Ash Street, Springfield, IL 62703-3500, 
telephone (217) 524-7903.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations within this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Illinois 
State Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of 
the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; 
Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and 
the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.

History and Description of the Remains

    In September 2011, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered during Phase II archaeological excavations 
conducted by the Illinois State Archaeological Survey (ISAS) at the Joe 
Louis site (11CK284), located on the right bank of the Little Calumet 
River in Cook County, IL. Human remains consisting of one cranial 
fragment (frontal bone) were found in the fill of a prehistoric pit 
(Feature 47) that evidently had a domestic function and was not a 
formal human interment. The human remains were identified by an ISAS 
skeletal analyst. In October 2011, the human remains were transferred 
to the Illinois State Museum (ISM 2011-143) in compliance with the 
state's Human Skeletal Remains Protection Act (20 ILCS 3440). No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Archaeological records, oral traditions, and linguistic 
relationships suggest that the human remains may be ancestral Winnebago 
(Ho-Chunk). First, the Joe Louis site is a single-component occupation 
of the Fisher phase (circa A.D. 1000-1400), a ``developmental'' phase 
of the broader Oneota tradition that likely evolved into the 
``classic'' Oneota Huber phase (A.D. 1400-1625). Huber ceramics are 
similar to ceramics made by the Iowa tribe, and there is widespread 
agreement that Huber and some other Oneota phases were ancestral to the 
Iowa, Otoe, Missouria, and Winnebago (Ho-Chunk) tribes. Second, 
Winnebago oral traditions record a protohistoric Ho-Chunk village 
(Gu[scaron]ge hon[ballot]k, or ``skunk run'') in the general vicinity 
of the Joe Louis site. Third, language similarities indicate that the 
Chiwere-speaking Iowa, Otoe, and Missouria tribes split from the 
Winnebago tribe at about A.D. 1600, several centuries after the Joe 
Louis site was occupied. In conclusion, human remains from the Joe 
Louis site have a plausible shared group identity with all of the 
Chiwere-Winnebago speaking tribes (i.e. Ho-Chunk, Iowa, Otoe, 
Missouria, Winnebago).
    The archaeological and geographical context of human remains from 
the Joe Louis site indicate that the individual is Native American. The 
Chiwere-Winnebago tribes are represented by five present-day Indian 
tribes: the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and 
Nebraska; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, 
Oklahoma; and the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.

Determinations Made by the Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL

    Officials of the Illinois State Museum have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native 
American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a plausible 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and 
Nebraska; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, 
Oklahoma; and the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Robert E. Warren, Curator of Anthropology, Illinois State Museum, 1011 
East Ash Street, Springfield, IL 62703-3500, telephone (217) 524-7903, 
before February 11, 2013. Repatriation of the human remains to the Ho-
Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; Iowa 
Tribe of Oklahoma; Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and the 
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The Illinois State Museum is responsible for notifying the Ho-Chunk 
Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; Iowa Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and the Winnebago 
Tribe of Nebraska that this notice has been published.

    Dated: December 7, 2012.
Melanie O'Brien,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2013-00446 Filed 1-10-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P




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