[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 84 (Tuesday, May 1, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 25741-25742]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-10499]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Arizona State Museum, University 
of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, has completed 
an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in 
consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined 
that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and 
associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes. 
Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects may contact the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona. 
Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to 
the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants 
come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, 
at the address below by May 31, 2012.

ADDRESSES: John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, Arizona State Museum, 
University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210026, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone 
(520) 626-2950.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects in the possession of the Arizona State 
Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. The human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed from archeological sites 
located in Maricopa and Pinal counties, AZ.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Arizona 
State Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of 
the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian 
Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River 
Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-
Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and 
the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona. The Gila River Indian Community 
of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona is acting on behalf of 
itself and the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) 
Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community 
of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O'odham Nation 
of Arizona.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1930, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from Queen Creek Ruin, also known as Sonoqui Pueblo, Pozos 
de Sonoqui, or Sun Temple Ruin (AZ U:14:48(ASM)/SACATON:2:6(GP)), in 
Maricopa County, AZ. The excavations were conducted by the Gila Pueblo 
Foundation. In December 1950, the Gila Pueblo Foundation closed and the 
collections were donated to the Arizona State Museum. No known 
individuals were identified. The three associated funerary objects are 
one ceramic bowl, one ceramic jar, and one ceramic pitcher.
    Queen Creek Ruin was a large habitation site that included trash 
mounds, burials, pithouses, canals, adobe compounds, and a ballcourt. 
Architectural features, the mortuary program, ceramic types, and other 
items of material culture are consistent with the Hohokam archeological 
tradition and indicate occupation between approximately A.D. 950 and 
1450.
    In 1927-1928, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from the Adamsville site (AZ U:15:1(ASM)/
FLORENCE:7:6(GP)), in Pinal County, AZ. The excavations were conducted 
by the Gila Pueblo Foundation. In December 1950, the Gila Pueblo 
Foundation closed and the collections were donated to the Arizona State 
Museum. No known individuals were identified. The three associated 
funerary objects are ceramic jars.
    At an unknown date, a surface collection survey was conducted at 
the same Adamsville site (AZ U:15:1(ASM)/FLORENCE:7:6(GP)), in Pinal 
County, AZ, by the Arizona State Museum. The survey collection was 
brought to the museum, but was never formally accessioned. A search 
through the survey collection was conducted in 2010. One human bone 
fragment from the Adamsville site, representing, at minimum, one 
individual, was found. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    The Adamsville site was a large village that included a platform 
mound, adobe structures, and ballcourts. Architectural features, the 
mortuary program, ceramic types, and other items of material culture 
are consistent with the Hohokam archeological tradition and indicate 
occupation between approximately A.D. 900 and 1450.
    In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, 50 individuals 
were removed from Escalante Ruin (AZ U:15:3(ASM)), in Pinal County, AZ. 
The legally authorized excavations were directed by David Doyel of the 
Arizona State Museum under contract with the Continental Oil Company. 
All

[[Page 25742]]

collections from this project were accessioned into Arizona State 
Museum collections in 1976. No known individuals were identified. The 
13 associated funerary objects are 1 ceramic beaker, 2 ceramic bowls, 2 
ceramic jars, 2 ceramic sherds, 4 shell beads, 1 lot of pebbles, and 1 
lot of minerals.
    Escalante Ruin was the central habitation site of the Escalante 
Group Complex. It contained a large platform mound, a compound, and a 
room block attached to the mound. Architectural features, the mortuary 
program, ceramic types, and other items of material culture are 
consistent with the Hohokam archeological tradition and indicate 
occupation between approximately A.D. 1150 and 1450.
    In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from an unnamed site (AZ U:15:22(ASM)), in Pinal County, 
AZ. The legally authorized excavations were directed by David Doyel of 
the Arizona State Museum under contract with the Continental Oil 
Company. All collections from this project were accessioned into 
Arizona State Museum collections in 1976. No known individuals were 
identified. The one associated funerary object is a ceramic jar.
    Site AZ U:15:22(ASM) was one of the components of the Escalante 
Group Complex. It contained two adobe compounds. Architectural 
features, the mortuary program, ceramic types, and other items of 
material culture are consistent with the Hohokam archeological 
tradition and indicate occupation between approximately A.D. 1200 and 
1350.
    In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, 19 individuals 
were removed from Las Casitas (AZ U:15:27(ASM)), in Pinal County, AZ. 
The legally authorized excavations were directed by David Doyel of the 
Arizona State Museum under contract with the Continental Oil Company. 
All collections from this project were accessioned into Arizona State 
Museum collections in 1976. No known individuals were identified. The 
31 associated funerary objects are 13 ceramic bowls, 7 ceramic jars, 1 
ceramic scoop, 5 ceramic sherds, 4 pieces of chipped stone, and 1 
flotation sample.
    Las Casitas was one of the components of the Escalante Group 
Complex. It contained two adobe compounds. Architectural features, the 
mortuary program, ceramic types, and other items of material culture 
are consistent with the Hohokam archeological tradition and indicate 
occupation between approximately A.D. 1200 and 1350.
    In 1973, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from Sidewinder Ruin (AZ U:15:32(ASM)) in Pinal County, 
AZ. The legally authorized excavations were directed by David Doyel of 
the Arizona State Museum under contract with the Continental Oil 
Company. All collections from this project were accessioned into 
Arizona State Museum collections in 1976. No known individuals were 
identified. The nine associated funerary objects are 3 ceramic bowls, 1 
ceramic jar, and 5 flotation samples.
    Sidewinder Ruin was one of the components of the Escalante Group 
Complex. It contained an adobe compound and associated trash mound. 
Architectural features, the mortuary program, ceramic types, and other 
items of material culture are consistent with the Hohokam archeological 
tradition and indicate occupation between approximately A.D. 1200 and 
1300.
    Continuities of mortuary practices, ethnographic materials, and 
technology indicate affiliation of Hohokam settlements with present-day 
O'odham (Piman) and Puebloan cultures. Documentation submitted by 
representatives of the Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River 
Indian Reservation, Arizona, on April 13, 2011, addresses continuities 
between the Hohokam and the O'odham tribes. Furthermore, oral 
traditions that are documented for the Ak Chin Indian Community of the 
Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian 
Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River 
Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona support 
affiliation with Hohokam sites in central Arizona.

Determinations Made by the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona

    Officials of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 80 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 60 objects described 
above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Ak Chin 
Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; 
Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, 
Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian 
Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono 
O'odham Nation of Arizona.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, Arizona 
State Museum, University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210026, Tucson, AZ 85721, 
telephone (520) 626-2950 before May 31, 2012. Repatriation of the human 
remains and associated funerary objects to the Ak Chin Indian Community 
of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River 
Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi 
Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt 
River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona 
may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Arizona State Museum is responsible for notifying the Ak Chin 
Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; 
Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, 
Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian 
Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono 
O'odham Nation of Arizona that this notice has been published.

    Dated: April 26, 2012.
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2012-10499 Filed 4-30-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P




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