[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 233 (Monday, December 5, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 75902-75905]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-31077]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, 
Bemidji, MN

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Minnesota Indian Affairs Council has completed an 
inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in 
consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined 
that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any 
present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that 
believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may 
contact the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. Disposition of the human 
remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes stated 
below may occur if no additional requestors come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the 
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council at the address below by January 4, 
2012.

ADDRESSES: James L. (Jim) Jones, Cultural Resource Director, Minnesota 
Indian Affairs Council, 3801 Bemidji Avenue NW., Suite 5, Bemidji, MN 
56601, telephone (218) 755-3223.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects in the possession of the Minnesota Indian 
Affairs Council (MIAC). The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from the following counties in MN: Brown, Carver, 
Dakota, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Grant, Hennepin, Kandiyohi, 
Murray, Nicollet, Nobles, Olmsted, Sibley, Traverse, and Wright.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service 
is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the MIAC 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe of South Dakota; Lower Sioux Indian 
Community in the State of Minnesota; Prairie Island Indian Community in 
the State of Minnesota; Santee Sioux Nation, Nebraska; Sisseton-
Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation, South Dakota; Spirit 
Lake Tribe, North Dakota; and the Upper Sioux Community, Minnesota 
(hereinafter referred to as ``The Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    Between 1994 and 1996, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 
individuals were discovered at the Helget site, 21-BW-82, in Brown 
County, MN, as a result of inadvertent backhoe disturbance on private 
property by the landowner. The remains were subsequently recovered by 
the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist. In 1995 and 1997, the 
human remains were transferred to the MIAC and assigned case number 
H291. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    The burial context and cranial morphology identify these human 
remains as pre-contact American Indian. These human remains have no 
archeological classification and cannot be identified with any present-
day Indian tribe.
    In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from an undesignated site in Carver County, MN, by Mr. 
Bleichner while rock collecting in a gravel pit. In 2002, Mr. Bleichner 
donated the remains to the Carver County Historical Society. The 
remains were then transferred to the Minnesota Office of the State 
Archaeologist and then to the MIAC (H407). No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The condition of the human remains suggests they are from a pre-
contact time period and femora morphology identifies them as American 
Indian. These human remains have no archeological classification and 
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1955 and 1956, human remains representing, at minimum, 15 
individuals were recovered from site, 21-DK-5, Bremer Mound in Dakota 
County, MN, during archeological excavations conducted by Elden Johnson 
and Louis Powell of the Science Museum of Minnesota. In 1994 and 2010, 
the human remains were transferred from the Science Museum of Minnesota 
to the MIAC and assigned case number H259. No known individuals were 
identified. The two associated funerary objects include a small 
triangular projectile point and a bone bead.
    Records at the Science Museum of Minnesota, including a M.A. thesis 
by Peter Jensen (``The Bremer Village and Mound Site,'' 1959) suggest 
the human remains and associated funerary objects are associated with 
the Late Woodland Tradition based on the similarity between the objects 
and artifactual material in the mound fill (ceramic sherds) with 
material found at the Late Woodland component of a nearby (\1/4\ mile) 
village site, 21-DK-6. These human remains are associated with the Late 
Woodland Tradition, an archeological classification which cannot be 
identified with any present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1990, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were transferred from the Fillmore County Museum to the MIAC's 
laboratory at Hamline University where they were assigned case number 
H175. Information with the transfer indicates the human remains were 
from a display in a doctor's office in Fillmore County. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The condition and cranial morphology of the human remains identify 
them as pre-contact American Indian. These human remains have no 
archeological classification and cannot be associated with any present-
day Indian tribe.
    In the 1950s, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were recovered by unknown person(s) from an outlet of 
Albert Lea

[[Page 75903]]

Lake in Freeborn County, MN. Records research suggests the human 
remains may be from site 21-FE-4. In 2007 the human remains were 
transferred to the Minnesota State Archaeologist's Office from the 
Albert Lea, MN Police Department and then to the MIAC where they were 
assigned case number H434. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Site records in the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist 
record 22 mounds at 21-FE-4 and indicate a Woodland Period temporal 
affiliation. These human remains are associated with the Woodland 
Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot be 
associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1948, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed by unknown person(s) from two burial mounds on the isthmus 
leading to Big Island, on the north shore of Albert Lea Lake in 
Freeborn County, MN. In 1974, the human remains were transferred to J. 
Oothoudt of the Minnesota Historical Society, who reported the human 
remains may be from site 21-FE-50. In 2007, the remains were 
posthumously donated by J. Oothoudt to the MIAC's laboratory at Hamline 
University where they were assigned case number H388. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    According to site records in the Minnesota Office of the State 
Archaeologist, site 21-FE-50 is a prehistoric artifact scatter with no 
specific archeological designation. Burial mounds are known to be 
present in the vicinity and are considered to be Woodland Tradition. 
These human remains are probably associated with the Woodland 
Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot be 
associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, nine 
individuals were removed from unidentified archeological sites in 
Goodhue County, MN, by Prof. E.W. Schmidt and donated to the Goodhue 
County Historical Society. In 1991, the human remains were transferred 
from the Goodhue County Historical Society to the MIAC's laboratory at 
Hamline University where they were assigned case number H188. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    These human remains lack documentation about provenience and the 
context in which they were uncovered in Goodhue County. Based on the 
condition of the bones, the remains are ancient and dental morphology 
identifies their American Indian ancestry. These human remains have no 
archeological classification and cannot be associated with any present-
day Indian tribe.
    In 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from site 21-GD-12, Hauge Lutheran Seminary Mounds in 
Goodhue County, MN in the process of house construction and donated to 
the Goodhue County Historical Society by R.F. Hedin. In 1991, the human 
remains were transferred to the MIAC and assigned case number H188. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Site records in the Office of the Minnesota State Archaeologist 
record two mounds at this site and indicate a probable Woodland Period 
temporal affiliation. These human remains are associated with the 
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot 
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    In the early 1900s, human remains representing, at minimum, four 
individuals were removed from site 21-GD-72, Belle Creek Mounds in 
Goodhue County, MN, by E.W. Schmidt, an amateur archeologist, and 
donated to the Goodhue County Historical Society. In 1991, the human 
remains were transferred to the MIAC and assigned case number H188. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Site records in the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist 
record 67 mounds at this site and indicate an association with the 
Woodland Tradition. These human are associated with the Woodland 
Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot be 
associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1931, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from a gravel pit, site 21-GR-51, in Grant County, MN, by 
unknown person(s). At an unknown date, the human remains were donated 
to the Minnesota Historical Society by private citizen, Kent Skaar. The 
human remains were transferred to the MIAC in 1991 (H193) and in 1993 
(H246). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    The context of the burial site identifies these human remains as 
pre-contact American Indian. These human remains have no archeological 
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian 
tribe.
    In 1964, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were disturbed from site 21-GR-4, Peterson Lake in Grant County, MN, by 
unknown person(s) during agricultural activity on the Peterson farm. 
The remains were recovered by William Goetzinger of the Grant County 
Historical Society. In 1990, the Grant County Historical Society 
donated the remains to the MIAC (H189). No known individual was 
identified. The 24 associated funerary objects include a circular 
limestone disc, an end scraper, a knife, 14 small, flat disk beads of 
shell, two round marine shell beads and a cluster of 5 worked beaver 
incisors.
    Site 21-GR-4 has been identified as possibly associated with the 
Archaic Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot be 
associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1995, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered by unknown person(s) from bluffs along the Minnesota 
River Valley in the city of Bloomington in Hennepin County, MN. The 
human remains were recovered by the Bloomington Minnesota Police 
Department and transferred to the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's 
Office for identification. In 1995, the human remains were transferred 
to the MIAC (H292). The Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist 
assigned site number 21-HE-154 to the locale to identify the presence 
of a burial site. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The human remains were determined to represent an individual from 
the pre-contact period based on the condition of the remains and 
observed dental pathology. They have been determined to be of American 
Indian ancestry based on cranial morphology. These human remains from 
have no archeological classification and cannot be associated with any 
present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1996, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the surface on the north half of Gale Island in 
Hennepin County, MN. The remains were discovered by Robert Louis Naas 
while walking on a paved path on the island and recovered by the 
Hennepin Country Crime Lab and Sheriff's Department. The human remains 
were transferred to the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office 
(HCMEO 96-1624) for identification and then transferred to the MIAC's 
laboratory at Hamline University (H303). Investigation by the Minnesota 
Office of the State Archaeologist concluded that the remains were 
likely exposed as a result of earlier landscaping and/or erosion 
activities. Archaeological site number

[[Page 75904]]

21-HE-271 was assigned to document the presence of a burial location. 
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    The condition of the human remains suggests an ancient context and 
the morphology of femora identifies American Indian ancestry. The human 
remains have no archeological classification and cannot be associated 
with any present-day Indian tribe.
    In the 1920s, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were recovered from Enchanted Island in Lake Minnetonka, 
Hennepin County, MN by George Cole. In 1999 the human remains were 
transferred to the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist by Mr. 
Cole's nephew, Lyle Chapman. In 2002, the remains were transferred to 
the MIAC (H381). No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The context and condition of the human remains suggest an ancient, 
pre-contact time period and the morphology of the skull and femora 
indicate American Indian ancestry. These human remains have no 
archeological classification and cannot be associated with any present-
day Indian tribe.
    In 1922, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals 
were removed from private property on Lake Florida in Kandiyohi County, 
MN, by unknown person(s) and donated to the Kandiyohi County Historical 
Society (Acc. 1405). In 1990, the human remains were transferred to the 
MIAC (H176). No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The context and condition of the remains identify these human 
remains as pre-contact American Indian affiliation. These human remains 
have no archeological classification and cannot be associated with any 
present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1885, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from a mound in an unknown location in Kandiyohi County, 
MN, by unknown person(s) and donated to the Meeker County Historical 
Society. In 1997, David Nystuen of the Minnesota Historical Society 
transferred the human remains from the Meeker County Historical Society 
to the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist. In 1999, the human 
remains were transferred to the MIAC (H368-1). No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains were reportedly recovered from a mound which 
suggests an association with the Woodland Tradition, a broad 
archeological classification which cannot be associated with any 
present-day Indian tribe.
    In the1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were recovered from a mound in an unknown location in 
Kandiyohi County, MN, by unknown person(s) and donated to the Meeker 
County Historical Society. In 1997, David Nystuen of the Minnesota 
Historical Society transferred the human remains from the Meeker County 
Historical Society to the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist. 
In 1999, the human remains were transferred to the MIAC (H368-2, H368-
3). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    These human remains were reportedly recovered from a mound which 
suggests an association with the Woodland Tradition and femoral 
morphology identifies these remains as American Indian. The Woodland 
Tradition is a broad archeological classification which cannot be 
associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from the Great Oasis type site or Nelson site (21-MU-2) 
in Murray County, MN, during archeological excavations by Dale Henning 
and personnel from the University of Minnesota and the University of 
Nebraska. The human remains were transferred to the University of Iowa. 
At an unknown date the human remains were transferred to the University 
of Minnesota. In 2002, the human remains were transferred to the MIAC 
(H387). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Records in the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist identify 
multi-components in the habitation area of the Great Oasis type site 
(21-MU-2). This burial and the associated human remains have been 
determined to be associated with the Great Oasis phase of the Plains 
Village Tradition (A.D. 900-1200), an archeological classification 
which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1954, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from site 21-NL-1, the Poehler Mound site in Nicollet 
County, MN, during archeological excavations by Lloyd Wilford of the 
University of Minnesota (UM384). Three burials were reportedly 
excavated and additional human remains were found in the mound fill but 
no human remains were accessioned into the University of Minnesota 
ledger purportedly because of the poor preservation of bone. Student 
field notes record leaving the remains in situ because they 
disintegrated upon excavation. The single human bone recorded here was 
erroneously identified as animal bone. In 2008, the UM384 material was 
transferred to the MIAC's laboratory at Hamline University, where the 
bone was correctly identified as human. No known individual was 
identified. The fifteen associated funerary objects are: two ceramic 
sherds, multiple sherds of a partial vessel, a chert core, a flake, a 
base of a corner-notched point, a biface tip, a chert scraper, a flat 
shell bead or gorget, an expanding stem point and five snail shells.
    These human remains are associated with the Middle Prehistoric 
period (3000 B.C.-A.D. 900), a broad archeological classification which 
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from an undesignated site in Nobles County, MN, by 
unknown person(s) and donated to the MIAC (H102). No known individual 
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains have no archeological classification and cannot 
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, eight 
individuals were removed from an undesignated site in Olmsted County, 
MN, by unknown person(s) and donated to the Olmsted County Historical 
Society. In 1991, the human remains were transferred to the MIAC 
(H190). No known individuals are identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    The condition of the human remains, femora morphology and dental 
attrition pattern identify these remains as pre-contact American 
Indian. These human remains have no archeological classification and 
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing, at 
minimum, one individual were removed from an unknown site in Olmsted 
County, MN, by unknown persons and donated to the Olmsted County 
Historical Society (Acc. 75.162.96). In 1994, the human remains were 
transferred to the MIAC (H273). No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    The condition of the human remains suggest an ancient, pre-contact 
time period. These human remains have no archeological classification 
and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe.

[[Page 75905]]

    In 1955, human remains representing, at minimum, fifteen 
individuals were recovered from site 21-SB-1, High Island Mound site/
Black Tortoise Mound in Sibley County, MN, during archeological 
excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University of Minnesota 
(UM395). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects were present.
    Site 21-SB-1 consists of 52 mounds. In 1955, L.A. Wilford excavated 
Mound 32, which contained both an Oneota burial (intrusive to the 
Woodland mound) and Woodland burials. The Oneota burial was reported as 
ancestral to the present-day Otoe and Iowa tribes (64 FR 40040, Friday, 
July 23, 1999) and repatriated and reburied in 2001. These human 
remains are associated with the Woodland Tradition, a broad 
archeological classification which cannot be associated with any 
present-day Indian tribe.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were recovered from Traverse County, MN, by unknown 
person(s). In 1999, Dave Nystuen of the Minnesota Historical Society 
transferred these remains to the Minnesota Office of the State 
Archaeologist. In 1999, the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist 
transferred these remains to the MIAC (H371). No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The condition of the human remains and dental patterns of attrition 
suggest an ancient pre-contact time period. Cranial morphology 
identifies the human remains as American Indian. These human remains 
have no archeological classification and cannot be associated with any 
present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1937, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were recovered from site 21-WR-19, the Waverly Lake site, Wright 
County, MN, by unknown person(s). In 1996, the human remains were 
donated to the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist and in 1997 
transferred to the MIAC (H321). No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Site 21-WR-19 represents a group of mounds mapped by T.H. Lewis in 
1881. In 1978, the Minnesota Statewide Archaeological Survey identified 
possible mound features in the area of site 21-WR-19, which suggest 
these human remains may be associated with the Woodland Tradition, a 
broad archeological classification which cannot be associated with any 
present-day Indian tribe.
    In 1999, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were discovered in a gravel pit in Dayton, Wright County, MN by unknown 
person(s). The Wright County Sheriff's Department recovered the human 
remains and transferred them to the Anoka County Coroner's Office/
Midwest Forensic Pathology. In 2000, the remains were transferred to 
the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist and site number 21-WR-
130, Dayton Quarry Burial was assigned to the location to document the 
presence of a burial site. In 2002, the human remains were transferred 
to the MIAC (H377). No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The context and condition of the human remains suggest a pre-
contact archeological association. Residents of the land parcel report 
the presence of aboriginal habitation debris in the area of recovery. 
These human remains have no archeological classification and cannot be 
associated with any present-day Indian tribe.

Determinations Made by the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council

    Officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have determined 
that:
     Based on non-destructive physical analysis and catalogue 
records, the human remains are Native American.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and any present-day Indian tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission, the land from which the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The 
Tribes.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 102 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 41 objects described 
above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains is to The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains or any other Indian tribe 
that believes it satisfies the criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should 
contact James L. (Jim) Jones, Cultural Resource Director, Minnesota 
Indian Affairs Council, 3801 Bemidji Avenue NW., Suite 5, Bemidji, MN 
56601, telephone (218) 755-3223, before January 4, 2012. Disposition of 
the human remains to The Tribes may proceed after that date if no 
additional requestors come forward.
    The Minnesota Indian Affairs Council is responsible for notifying 
The Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: November 29, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-31077 Filed 12-2-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P






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