[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 140 (Thursday, July 21, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 43714-43715]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-18356]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University 
Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Oregon State University Department of Anthropology has 
completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is a cultural 
affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes. 
Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Oregon 
State University Department of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human 
remains to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional 
claimants come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Oregon 
State University Department of Anthropology at the address below by 
August 22, 2011.

ADDRESSES: Dr. David McMurray, Oregon State University Department of 
Anthropology, 238 Waldo Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, telephone (541) 737-
4515.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the 
control of the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, 
Corvallis, OR. The human remains were removed from the mouth of the 
Sandy River, Multnomah County, OR.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Oregon State 
University Department of Anthropology professional staff in 
consultation with a Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area 
archeologist, and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community 
of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, 
Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; 
and the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho. The Burns Paiute Tribe; Confederated 
Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Confederated Tribes 
of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians of Oregon; Confederated 
Tribes

[[Page 43715]]

of the Siletz Indians of Oregon; Coquille Tribe of Oregon; Cow Creek 
Band of Umpqua Indians of Oregon; and Klamath Tribes, Oregon, were 
notified, but did not participate in consultations about the human 
remains described in this notice.

History and Description of the Remains

    In the 1970s, human remains representing a minimum of three 
individuals were removed from somewhere near the mouth of the Sandy 
River, in Multnomah County, OR. The human remains were removed due to 
illegal pot-hunting activities. The human remains were subsequently 
given to the university, but specific provenience information was not 
provided. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Ethnographic records suggest the mouth of the Sandy River, where it 
meets the Columbia River, was occupied by Chinookan peoples. The 
Chinookan peoples occupied a vast area for hunting, fishing, and trade 
that was ``south of the Columbia from the cascades to the mouth of the 
Willamette'' (Berreman, 1937). The Sandy River is within this vast 
area. The human remains described above are believed to have been 
removed from this area, which is within or near the traditional lands 
of the Chinookan peoples whose descendants are members of the present-
day Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and 
Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon.
    The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon 
includes numerous bands from western Oregon, as well as some 
communities from extreme southwestern Washington and northern 
California. These communities and bands are the Clackamas Chinook, 
Multnomah Chinook, Clatsop Chinook, Willapa Chinook, Lower Chinook 
Proper, Nehalem, Salmon River, Tillamook, Nestucca, Kathlamet or 
Wahkiakum Chinook, Skilloot, Clatskanie, Clowewalla of the Tumwater, 
Cascades or Mehetatate of the Tumwater, Tualatin Calapooia, Yamhill 
Calapooia, Pudding River or Ahantchuyak Calapooia, Santiam Calapooia, 
Che-lucke-mute or Luckiamute Calapooia, Chelamelah or Long Tom 
Calapooia, Winefelly, Chemapho or Muddy Creek Calapooia, Chepenefa or 
Marys River Calapooia, Tsankupi or Tecopa Calapooia, Mohawk or Chefan 
Calapooia, Yoncalla, Northern Molalla, Southern Molalla, Latgawa or 
Upper Takelma, Rogue River, Upper Umpqua, and Northern Shasta. At the 
time of contact, the individual groups spoke 30 dialects of the 
Athapascan, Chinookan, Kalapuyan, Takelman, Molalan, Sahaptin, 
Salishan, and Shastan language families. In 1856-1857, the U.S. 
Government forcibly relocated the Grand Ronde peoples to the Grand 
Ronde Reservation, located at the headwaters of the South Yamhill River 
in Yamhill and Polk Counties, OR. The last additions to the Grand Ronde 
came onto the reservation in the 1870s. The Confederated Tribes of the 
Grand Ronde Community of Oregon were first incorporated in 1935, 
terminated from Federal recognition in 1954, and restored to recognized 
status in 1983.
    The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon 
are composed of the Wasco Tribe, the Warm Springs Tribes, and groups of 
Northern Paiutes. The Wasco Tribe, made up of the Dalles and Dog River 
bands, occupied the lower Columbia River area and belong to the 
Chinookan language group. The Warm Springs Tribes, composed of the 
Upper Deschutes (Tygh), Lower Deschutes (Wyam), Tenino and John Day 
(Dock-spus) bands, lived on the Deschutes and John Day Rivers, as well 
as up river of the Wasco Tribe on the Columbia River. The Northern 
Paiutes were forcibly moved onto the Warm Springs Reservation in 1879 
and 1884, but originally had roamed a large territory that included 
parts of the Deschutes and John Day River Valleys, as well as high 
desert territories to the east and south of the reservation. In 1855, 
the Warm Springs and Wasco Tribes entered into a treaty with the United 
States of America, ceding more than 10 million acres of land. In 1938, 
the Warm Springs, Wasco and Northern Paiute Tribes formed a 
confederacy.

Determinations Made by the Oregon State University Department of 
Anthropology

    Officials of the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology 
have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of three individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde 
Community of Oregon and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs 
Reservation of Oregon.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
David McMurray, Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, 238 
Waldo Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, telephone (541) 737-3850, before 
August 22, 2011. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated 
Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and the Confederated 
Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon may proceed after that 
date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Oregon State University Department of Anthropology is 
responsible for notifying the Burns Paiute Tribe; Confederated Tribes 
and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the 
Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians of Oregon; Confederated Tribes 
of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the 
Siletz Indians of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian 
Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs 
Reservation of Oregon; Coquille Tribe of Oregon; Cow Creek Band of 
Umpqua Indians of Oregon; Klamath Tribes, Oregon; and Nez Perce Tribe, 
Idaho, that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 14, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-18356 Filed 7-20-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P




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