FR Doc E9-22780[Federal Register: September 22, 2009 (Volume 74, Number 182)]
[Notices]               
[Page 48289]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr22se09-101]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service
 
Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of 
Dentistry, New York, NY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.
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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human 
remains were removed from Hempstead County, AR.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by New York 
University College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma and Osage Nation, 
Oklahoma.
    In 1916, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from the Ozan 5 Site (3HE59), Hempstead County, AR, by 
Mark Harrington, as part of a Museum of the American Indian, Heye 
Foundation expedition. In 1956, the human remains were transferred to 
Dr. Theodore Kazamiroff, New York University College of Dentistry. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Museum of the American Indian records list the locality of origin 
as the Ozan 5 Site, AR, and provide specific skeleton numbers, 13 and 
17, for the human remains. These human remains were excavated from the 
"Main Cemetery" of the Ozan 5 site. The morphology of the human 
remains is consistent with Native American ancestry and the cranial 
remodeling exhibited by one individual is consistent with Caddoan 
cultural practices. Pottery types and burial styles suggest that the 
cemetery dates to sometime between A.D. 1400 and 1700.
    In 1916, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
were removed from the Washington Site (3HE35), Hempstead County, AR, by 
Mark Harrington, as part of a Museum of the American Indian, Heye 
Foundation expedition. In 1956, the human remains were transferred to 
Dr. Theodore Kazamiroff, New York University College of Dentistry. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Museum of the American Indian records list the locality of origin 
as the Washington Site, AR. All three sets of remains were removed from 
Mound 10, with one individual removed from burial 90 and the remaining 
two individuals removed from burial 93. The morphology of the human 
remains is consistent with Native American ancestry and the cranial 
remodeling exhibited by two individuals is consistent with Caddoan 
mortuary practices. Pottery types and burial styles suggest that the 
cemetery dates to sometime between A.D. 1400 and 1600.
    Hempstead County is part of the Texarkana or Big Bend archeological 
region. Caddoan traditions identify the Texarkana region as part of the 
Caddo homelands and locate the point of origin of the Caddo people near 
the Red River or Hot Springs, in the Big Bend region. Late Prehistoric 
and Protohistoric phases for this area include the Belcher and 
Texarkana phases. These phases are associated with Caddoan-speaking 
people who became known as the Kadohadacho. The first historic records 
of the Kadohadocho villages in the Big Bend region of the Red River are 
from DeSoto's travels in 1542. The Kadohadacho remained in the region 
until the late 18th century. In 1835, the Kadohadacho ceded their land 
and united with other Caddoan groups in Texas. In 1859, the Caddo 
relocated to Oklahoma. In 1938, the Caddo organized as the Caddo Nation 
under the Indian Reorganization Act. Support for the cultural 
relationship between historic Kadohadacho and pre-Contact sites in the 
Big Bend region can be seen in the continuity of mortuary practices. 
During consultations, Caddo representatives identified the burials from 
these sites as Caddo and provided oral tradition, ethnographic, and 
archeological evidence to support this identification.
    Officials of New York University College of Dentistry have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of five individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of New York University College of 
Dentistry also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), 
there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the Native American human remains and the Caddo Nation 
of Oklahoma.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Louis Terracio, New York University College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th 
St., New York, NY 10010, telephone (212) 998-9917, before October 22, 
2009. Repatriation of the human remains to the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma 
may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The New York University College of Dentistry is responsible for 
notifying the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma and Osage Tribe, Oklahoma that 
this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 8, 2009
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E9-22780 Filed 9-21-09; 8:45 am]

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