FR Doc 04-20648
[Federal Register: September 14, 2004 (Volume 69, Number 177)]
[Notices]               
[Page 55454-55456]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr14se04-85]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks 
and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the California Department of Parks and 
Recreation, Sacramento, CA. The human remains were removed from Madera, 
Merced, Stanislaus, and San Joaquin Counties, CA, and from unknown 
locations in California.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by California 
Department of Parks and Recreation professional staff in consultation 
with representatives of the Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians of 
California; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, 
California; Table Mountain Rancheria of California; and Tule River 
Indian Tribe of the Tule River Reservation, California.
    Madera County, CA.
    On an unknown date before August 1961, human remains consisting of 
one tooth and representing a minimum of one individual were removed 
from site CA-MAD-102 on the northern shoreline of Millerton Lake in 
Millerton Lake State Recreation Area in Madera County, CA, during a 
cultural resources survey. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Site CA-MAD-102 is a habitation site covering approximately one-
half acre. Three triangular projectile points found at the site suggest 
that it was occupied after A.D. 500, while a glass bead and ceramic and 
glass fragments suggest that the site continued to be occupied into the 
Historic period, which in California began around A.D. 1650. Site CA-
MAD-102 lies within the historically documented geographic area 
inhabited by the Northern Valley Yokuts.

[[Page 55455]]

    Merced County, CA.
    In 1961, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals 
were removed from site GWH 68, J 26 in Merced, Merced County, CA, 
during a salvage survey undertaken by F.A. Riddell for the California 
Department of Parks and Recreation. Site GWH 68, J 26 was partially 
destroyed in March 1961 by gravel mining on private land when several 
burials were bulldozed. No known individuals were identified. The 14 
associated funerary objects are 2 slabs, 3 mortars, 1 shell, 4 flakes, 
1 charcoal sample, 1 mano, 1 pestle, and 1 metal cable.
    Stylistic and technological attributes of the cultural items 
provide a date for the burials between the late Prehistoric and early 
Historic periods. Site GWH 68, J 26 lies within the historically 
documented geographic area inhabited by the Yokuts, Kawatchwah, and 
Nopchinchi tribes of the Northern Valley Yokuts.
    Stanislaus County, CA.
    In 1986, human remains representing a minimum of seven individuals 
were removed from three sites on the south fork of Orestimba Creek in 
the eastern portion of Henry J. Coe State Park in Stanislaus County, 
CA. Five individuals were removed from site CA-STA-207, one individual 
was removed from site CA-STA-234, and one individual was removed from 
site CA-STA-204. The human remains were collected by California 
Department of Parks and Recreation archaeologists Joe D. Hood and John 
L. Kelly during an archeological assessment of the proposed Orestimba 
day-use facility. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.

    The age of the burials is unknown. The sites lie within the 
historically documented geographic areas inhabited by the Yalesumne, 
Lakisamne, Kawatchwah, and Coconoon tribes of the Northern Valley 
Yokuts.
    San Joaquin County, CA.
    In 1962, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from site CA-SJO-152 in Caswell Memorial State Park in 
south-central San Joaquin County, CA, by Walter Brown, who donated the 
human remains to the California Department of Parks and Recreation. The 
human remains were sent to the California State Indian Museum in 
Sacramento, CA, in 1987. The museum has been managed by the California 
Department of Parks and Recreation since 1947. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on the presence of Olivella beads in lower levels at the 
site, the burials have been dated to the Middle Horizon (2000 B.C.- 
A.D. 400). Site CA-SJO-152 lies within the historically documented 
geographic area inhabited by the Yalesumne, Lakisamne, and Apelumne 
tribes of the Northern Valley Yokuts.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from site CA-SJO-105, 3 miles north of the 
Calaveras River and north of Stockton, in central San Joaquin County, 
CA. The human remains were collected by Vincent Marino of Stockton, CA, 
who donated the human remains to the California State Indian Museum in 
Sacramento, CA, in August 1963. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    The age of the burial is unknown. Site CA-SJO-105 lies within the 
historically documented geographic area inhabited by the Yachicumne and 
Chulamni tribes of the Northern Valley Yokuts.
    In 1970 and 1971, human remains representing a minimum of two 
individuals were removed from site CA-SJO-91, French Camp Slough (also 
known as Schenck-Dawson 91, Barr Island, and Jones Mound 4) in San 
Joaquin County, CA. The human remains were excavated by Sacramento City 
College under the supervision of Jerald J. Johnson and came into 
possession of the California Department of Parks and Recreation in 
1985. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    The age of the burials is attributed to the Middle Horizon (2000 
B.C.- A.D. 400). Site CA-SJO-91 lies within the historically documented 
geographic area inhabited by the Yachicumne, Chulamni, and Jalalon 
tribes of the Northern Valley Yokuts.
    At an unknown date prior to 1960, a minimum of one individual was 
removed from site CA-SJO-89, the Garwood Ferry Mound site, in 
southwestern San Joaquin County, CA. The acquisition history is 
unknown, although the human remains were part of the California State 
Indian Museum's collection in Sacramento, CA, prior to acquisition by 
the California Department of Parks and Recreation. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The age of the burial is unknown. Site CA-SJO-89 lies within the 
historically documented geographic area inhabited by the Yachicumne, 
Chulamni, and Chucumne tribes of the Northern Valley Yokuts.
    In 1951 and 1952, human remains representing a minimum of two 
individuals were removed after a flood from site CA-SJO-10, a mound 
located along the Stanislaus River in San Joaquin County, CA. One of 
the burials was donated to Columbia State Historic Park, Columbia, CA, 
in 1953 by Dan L. Bava of Escalon, CA, and the other burial was donated 
to Columbia State Historic Park in 1955 by Loren E. Hill. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    The age of the burials is unknown. Site CA-SJO-10 lies within the 
historically documented geographic area inhabited by the Yalesumne, 
Lakisamne, and Apelumne tribes of the Northern Valley Yokuts.
    All of the sites described above lie within Yokuts territory. 
Archeologists believe that the Penutian-speaking Yokuts are descended 
from the Windmiller people, who occupied the Central Valley of 
California from 4,000 to 3,000 years ago. The Yokuts territory was the 
largest of the prehistoric tribes' territory in California, and 
included almost the entire Central Valley, bounded in the north by 
where the San Joaquin River empties into the Sacramento River, and in 
the south by the foothills of the Tehachepi Mountains. The Yokuts 
comprised over 200 villages or communities, each with its own 
subsistence strategy and belonging to distinct dialect groups, and are 
today represented by three groups or living areas: the Northern Valley 
Yokuts, Southern Valley Yokuts, and Foothill Yokuts. Archeological, 
ethnographic, historical and oral historical evidence link the Northern 
Valley Yokuts to the present-day Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi 
Indians of California; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa 
Rancheria, California; Table Mountain Rancheria of California; and Tule 
River Indian Tribe of the Tule River Reservation, California.
    Unknown Counties, CA.
    At an unknown date between 1927 and 1932, human remains 
representing a minimum of one individual were removed from an unknown 
location in California by Frank Latta who donated the human remains to 
the California Department of Parks and Recreation on July 24, 1998. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    The age of the human remains is unknown. The California Department 
of Parks and Recreation Committee on Repatriation determined that, 
while the collection lacks provenience, it is likely that the human 
remains are Yokuts since most of Mr. Latta's research and collection 
activity was in the historical geographical territory of the Yokuts. 
The present-day tribes that have a shared

[[Page 55456]]

group identity with the Yokuts are the Picayune Rancheria of the 
Chukchansi Indians of California, Santa Rosa Indian Community of the 
Santa Rosa Rancheria, California; Table Mountain Rancheria of 
California; and the Tule River Indian Tribe of the Tule River 
Reservation, California.
    On an unknown date between 1927 and 1932, human remains 
representing a minimum of 13 individuals were removed from an unknown 
location in California by Frank Latta who donated the human remains to 
the California Department of Parks and Recreation on July 24, 1988. No 
known individuals were identified. The 64 associated funerary objects 
are 1 glass bead, 2 steatite beads, 3 Haliotis beads, 10 Olivella 
beads, 4 shell beads, 1 dentalium bead, 1 shell bead with asphaltum, 1 
Haliotis ornament, 1 lithic blade, 5 flakes, 2 bifaces, 2 scrapers, 6 
projectile points, 1 brass strap, 1 chalk sample, 1 antler tine, 13 
food remains, 3 botanical samples, 4 soil samples, and 2 unknown items.
    The age of the human remains and associated funerary objects is 
unknown. The associated funerary objects are consistent with the types 
used by the Northern and Southern Valley Yokuts. The California 
Department of Parks and Recreation Committee on Repatriation determined 
that, while the collection lacks provenience, it is likely that the 
human remains are Yokuts since most of Mr. Latta's research and 
collection activity was in the historical geographical territory of the 
Yokuts. The present-day tribes that have a shared group identity to the 
Yokuts are the Picayune Rancheria of the Chukchansi Indians of 
California, Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, 
California; Table Mountain Rancheria of California; and the Tule River 
Indian Tribe of the Tule River Reservation, California.
    Officials of the California Department of Parks and Recreation have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains 
listed above represent the physical remains of 34 individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the California Department of Parks and 
Recreation also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 
(3)(A), the 78 objects described above are reasonably believed to have 
been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death 
or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of 
the California Department of Parks and Recreation have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group 
identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and the Picayune 
Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians of California; Santa Rosa Indian 
Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California; Table Mountain 
Rancheria of California; and Tule River Indian Tribe of the Tule River 
Reservation, California.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Paulette Hennum, NAGPRA Coordinator, California 
Department of Parks and Recreation, 1416 Ninth Street, Sacramento, CA, 
telephone (916) 653-7976, before October 14, 2004. Repatriation of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to the Picayune Rancheria 
of Chukchansi Indians of California; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the 
Santa Rosa Rancheria, California; Table Mountain Rancheria of 
California; and Tule River Indian Tribe of the Tule River Reservation, 
California may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    The California Department of Parks and Recreation is responsible 
for notifying the Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians of 
California; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, 
California; Table Mountain Rancheria of California; and Tule River 
Indian Tribe of the Tule River Reservation, California that this notice 
has been published.

    Dated: July 23, 2004.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources.
[FR Doc. 04-20648 Filed 9-13-04; 8:45 am]

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