FR Doc 04-20646
[Federal Register: September 14, 2004 (Volume 69, Number 177)]
[Notices]               
[Page 55452-55454]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr14se04-84]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks 
and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the California Department of Parks and 
Recreation, Sacramento, CA. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from Sacramento and San Joaquin Counties, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by California 
Department of Parks and Recreation professional staff in consultation 
with representatives of the Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-wuk Indians of 
California; Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; 
Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California; Jackson Rancheria of Me-Wuk 
Indians of California; Picayune Rancheria of the Chukchansi Indians of 
California; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, 
California; Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs 
Rancheria (Verona Tract), California; Table Mountain Rancheria of 
California; Tule River Indian Tribe of the Tule River Reservation, 
California; Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria 
of California; and United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn 
Rancheria of California.
    Also consulted were the Central Sierra Me-wuk Cultural and Historic 
Preservation Committee (a committee

[[Page 55453]]

that represents the Miwok), American Indian Council of Mariposa, 
Calaveras Band of MiWuk (a nonfederally recognized Indian group), and 
the Sierra Nevada Native American Council.
    In the 1930s, human remains representing a minimum of two 
individuals were removed from site CA-SAC-107, which is located 3 miles 
southeast of Elk Grove and south of the Cosumnes River in south-central 
Sacramento County, CA. The site was excavated by students from 
Sacramento Junior College. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were held by three private collectors: Anthony H. Ishisaka, N. 
Blackman, and Ric Windmiller. Mr. Ishisaka donated his collection to 
the California State Indian Museum, in Sacramento, CA, on September 1, 
1958. Mr. Blackman donated his collection to the Nevada State Museum in 
1937, which later donated the collection to the California State Indian 
Museum on June 17, 1976. Mr. Windmiller donated his part of the 
collection to the California State Indian Museum on March 24, 1959. The 
California State Indian Museum has been managed by the California 
Department of Parks and Recreation since 1947. No known individuals 
were identified. The 55 associated funerary objects are 6 Haliotis 
beads attached to one of the crania, 2 Haliotis ornaments, 33 Haliotis 
beads, and 14 Olivella beads.
    Components of site CA-SAC-107 show dates that range from the Early 
Horizon period (beginning around 2000 B.C.) into the historic period. 
The technology and style of the associated funerary objects is 
consistent with the Early Horizon period, also known as the Windmiller 
pattern. Other burials at the site, probably later than the two 
described above, are dated by radiocarbon to 3,075 years B.P. (< plus-
minus>105 years) and 2,675 years B.P. (125 years). 
California Department of Parks and Recreation archeologist Dr. Peter D. 
Shultz stated that the human remains from the site were Northern Valley 
Yokuts based on funerary practices and proximity to known Yokuts areas 
or Plains Miwok based on Miwok occupation of the Central Valley and 
oral historical accounts of Miwok families occupying the area.
    On June 3, 1974, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from the Blossom Mound site (CA-SJO-68), 
located 2 miles northwest of Thornton, CA, and in the delta south of 
the Mokelumne River in northwestern San Joaquin County, CA. The human 
remains were collected by California Department of Parks and Recreation 
archeologist Dr. Peter D. Shultz. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    There was no direct dating of these burials, but the site is 
attributed the Early Horizon period, also known as the Windmiller 
pattern, which begins around 4,000 years ago. The collection has been 
identified with the Yachicumne tribe of the Northern Valley Yokuts, or 
Plains Miwok. California Department of Parks and Recreation 
archeologist Dr. Peter D. Shultz stated that the human remains from the 
site were Northern Valley Yokuts based on funerary practices and 
proximity to known Yokuts areas or Plains Miwok based on Miwok 
occupation of the Central Valley and oral historical accounts of Miwok 
families occupying the area.
    On June 5, 1958 human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from the McGillivray Mound site (CA-SJO-142), 
located in the Sacramento Delta, south of the Mokelumne River, in the 
northwest corner of San Joaquin County, CA. The human remains were 
collected by Norman L. Wilson and William H. Olsen prior to 
construction of a Pacific Gas and Electric Company pipeline. No known 
individuals were identified. The three associated funerary objects are 
two Haliotis ornaments with Olivella beads and asphaltum attached to 
them and one cobble.
    There was no direct dating of these burials, but the site is 
attributed to the Early Horizon period, which began around 2000 B.C., 
and the Middle Horizon period, which ended around A.D. 400. The style 
and technology of the associated funerary objects is consistent with 
the Windmiller pattern. The collection has been identified with the 
Yachicumne or Jalalon tribe of Northern Valley Yokuts, or with Plains 
Miwok. California Department of Parks and Recreation archeologist Dr. 
Peter D. Shultz stated that the human remains from the site were 
Northern Valley Yokuts based on proximity to known Yokuts areas, or 
Plains Miwok based on Miwok occupation of the Central Valley of 
California and oral historical accounts of Miwok families occupying the 
area.
    In September of 1965, human remains representing a minimum of 11 
individuals were removed from site CA-SJO-150, located 10 miles 
northeast of Stockton, CA, and south of the Calaveras River in central 
San Joaquin County, CA. The human remains were removed by Mrs. Marie 
Descher of Stockton and were placed in the California Department of 
Parks and Recreation collection. The burials were recorded by F.A. 
Riddell on July 23, 1966. No known individuals were identified. The 37 
associated funerary objects are 3 food remains, 4 flakes, 18 pieces of 
baked clay, 1 scraper, 6 Haliotis beads, and 5 Olivella beads.
    Based on the technology and style of the associated funerary 
objects, the site has been dated to the Middle Horizon period (circa 
2000 B.C.- A.D. 400). Geographical location indicates that the human 
remains are likely associated with the Northern Valley Yokuts or with 
Plains Miwok.

    At an unknown date prior to December 1963, human remains 
representing a minimum of one individual were removed from an 
undetermined site south of the Mokelumne River in the vicinity of 
Lockeford, in northeastern San Joaquin County, CA. The human remains 
were donated by Donald D. Tribble of Sacramento, CA, to the California 
State Indian Museum on December 2, 1963, and a gift deed was approved 
on January 22, 1964. The human remains were stored in California 
Department of Parks and Recreation's Sutter's Fort Annex and were 
subsequently moved to the State Museum Resource Center in West 
Sacramento, CA. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The age of the human remains is unknown. Geographical location 
indicates that the human remains are likely associated with the 
Northern Valley Yokuts or with Plains Miwok.
    In 1973, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
were removed from the Safflower site (CA-SJO-145), also known as New 
Hope 2, C-145, located in the delta south of the big bend of the 
Mokulumne River in northwestern San Joaquin County, CA. Archeological 
salvage excavations for the planned Delta Peripheral Canal were 
conducted from April to June 1973 by the California Department of Parks 
and Recreation and supervised by Dr. Peter D. Shultz. No known 
individuals were identified. The 18 associated funerary objects are 2 
flakes, 1 projectile point, 1 piece of baked clay, 1 mammal bone, and 
13 pieces of shell.
    The three burials were dated by radiocarbon analysis, the first 
burial to 1,870 years B.P. (250 years), the second burial 
to 900 years B.P. (250 years), and the third burial to 
2,500 years B.P. (200 years). The associated funerary 
objects are consistent with the Middle Horizon period (circa 2000 B.C.-
A.D. 400). The site is believed to be Northern Valley Yokuts or Central 
Sierra Miwok based on early movement of both groups near the borders of 
what is now

[[Page 55454]]

identified as their historic geographical territories.
    All of the sites described above lie within Yokuts or Miwok 
territory. Archeologists believe that the Penutian-speaking Yokuts and 
Miwok are descended from the Windmiller people who occupied the Central 
Valley of California 4,000 to 3,000 years ago. The history of the 
California rancherias in the Central Valley and Sierra Nevada foothill 
regions of California shows that the descendants of the historic 
Northern Valley Yokuts and Plains Miwok were ultimately dispersed to 
the federally recognized Yokuts and Miwok rancherias. The present-day 
tribes that have a shared group identity with the Yokuts and Miwok are 
the Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-wuk Indians of California; Chicken 
Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Ione Band of Miwok 
Indians of California; Jackson Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of 
California; Picayune Rancheria of the Chukchansi Indians of California; 
Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California; 
Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria 
(Verona Tract), California; Table Mountain Rancheria of California; 
Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of 
California; and United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn Rancheria 
of California.
    Officials of the California Department of Parks and Recreation have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of 19 individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the California Department of 
Parks and Recreation also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 
3001 (3)(A), the 113 objects described above are reasonably believed to 
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of 
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials 
of the California Department of Parks and Recreation have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared 
group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Buena 
Vista Rancheria of Me-wuk Indians of California; Chicken Ranch 
Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Ione Band of Miwok Indians 
of California; Jackson Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; 
Picayune Rancheria of the Chukchansi Indians of California; Santa Rosa 
Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California; Shingle 
Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona 
Tract), California; Table Mountain Rancheria of California; Tuolumne 
Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California; and 
United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn Rancheria of California.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Paulette Hennum, NAGPRA Coordinator, California 
Department of Parks and Recreation, 1416 Ninth Street, Sacramento, CA 
95814, telephone (916) 653-7976, before October 14, 2004. Repatriation 
of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Buena Vista 
Rancheria of Me-wuk Indians of California; Chicken Ranch Rancheria of 
Me-Wuk Indians of California; Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California; 
Jackson Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Picayune Rancheria 
of the Chukchansi Indians of California; Santa Rosa Indian Community of 
the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California; Shingle Springs Band of Miwok 
Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract), California; Table 
Mountain Rancheria of California; Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of 
the Tuolumne Rancheria of California; and United Auburn Indian 
Community of the Auburn Rancheria of California may proceed after that 
date if no additional claimants come forward.
    California Department of Parks and Recreation is responsible for 
notifying the Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-wuk Indians of California; 
Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Ione Band of 
Miwok Indians of California; Jackson Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of 
California; Picayune Rancheria of the Chukchansi Indians of California; 
Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California; 
Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria 
(Verona Tract), California; Table Mountain Rancheria of California; 
Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of 
California; and United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn Rancheria 
of California that this notice has been published.

John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources.
[FR Doc. 04-20646 Filed 9-13-04; 8:45 am]

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