[Federal Register: October 26, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 208)]
[Notices]
[Page 64232-64233]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr26oc00-93]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of The State Museum
of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, PA

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of The State Museum of Pennsylvania,
Harrisburg, PA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.

[[Page 64233]]

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by The State
Museum of Pennsylvania professional staff in consultation with
representatives of the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma (formerly Delaware
Tribe of Western Oklahoma); and the Delaware Tribe of Indians,
Oklahoma.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing six individuals were
removed during excavations at the Overpeck Site (36Bu5), Bridgeton
Township, Bucks County, PA by William Strohmeir and Elmer Erb. In 1983,
remains representing one of these individuals were donated to The State
Museum of Pennsylvania by Mr. Strohmeir. Remains representing four of
these individuals were donated to the museum by Mr. Erb the same year.
In 1986, the Society of Pennsylvania Archaeologists purchased the last
set of these remains from the estate of Mr. Erb and donated them to The
State Museum of Pennsylvania. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Previous archeological investigations at the Overpeck Site
identified 15th century proto-historic pottery styles characteristic of
the Lenape (Delaware). Ethnohistorical accounts also place Lenape bands
in the vicinity of the site during the early Colonial Period. There is
no evidence to contradict this.
    In 1978, human remains representing 15 individuals and 2,206
associated funerary objects were removed during excavations at the
Montgomery Site (36Ch60), Wallace Township, Chester County, PA by Dr.
Marshall Becker, West Chester University. Dr. Becker donated the
remains and objects to The State Museum of Pennsylvania the same year.
No known individuals were identified. The associated funerary objects
include animal bone fragments; glass, seed, and wampum beads; brass
bells; buckskin fragments; charcoal fragments; clothing fasteners;
brass, silver, and iron buckles; copper and pewter buttons; glass
bottle fragments; iron tools; coffin and regular nails; miscellaneous
brass fragments; hinges; miscellaneous seeds and nuts; a pewter pipe; a
stone scraper; fabric fragments; a thimble; unidentified organic
material; and wood fragments.
    The Euroamerican assemblage of objects dates the burials to the
18th century. Oral tradition, and ethnohistorical and archeological
evidence place a ``Brandywine Band'' of the Lenape (Delaware) at the
site circa A.D. 1730. There is no evidence to contradict this.
    In 1976, human remains representing one individual were removed
from the Printz Park Site (36De3), Tinicum Township, Delaware County,
PA by Dr. Marshall Becker, West Chester University, while under
contract to The State Museum of Pennsylvania. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Ethnohistoric evidence and archeological evidence indicate that the
remains most likely are associated with a protohistoric Lenape
(Delaware) occupation, circa A.D. 1500 at the Prinz Park Site. There is
no evidence to contradict this.
    At an unknown date, human remains and funerary objects were removed
from the Chambers Site (36 Lr11), Union Township, Lawrence County, PA
by John A. Zukcia. In 1968, The State Museum of Pennsylvania purchased
human remains representing eight of these individuals from Mr. Zukcia.
No known individuals were identified. The State Museum of Pennsylvania
also purchased 5,128 funerary objects removed during the same
excavations at the Chambers Site. A total of 2,116 objects were
associated with the 8 burials in the possession of The State Museum of
Pennsylvania. The remainder of the purchased objects are associated
with burials currently in the possession of the Carnegie Museum,
Pittsburg, PA. The associated funerary objects include brass, seed,
glass, shell, and silver beads; brass bells; a brass kettle; buckskin
fragments; iron buckles; brass, silver, and wood buttons; gun parts;
Euroamerican ceramics; iron tools; knife blade fragments, box
fragments; coffin and regular nails; hinges; leather fragments; charred
maize cobs; mirror fragments; bracelets; danglers; brooches; rings;
earrings; cufflinks; pendants; spoons; strike-a-lights; thimbles;
textiles; wampum belt fragments; and wood fragments.
    The Euroamerican assemblage of objects associated with the human
remains dates the burials to the 18th century. Ethnohistoric and
documentary evidence identify the Chambers Site as a Lenape (Delaware)
occupation dating to A.D. 1763-1776. There is no evidence to contradict
this.
    In 1978, human remains representing 28 individuals and 11,097
associated funerary objects were removed during excavations at the
Wapwallopen Site (also known as the Knouse Site) (36 Lu43), Conyngham
Township, Luzerne County, PA by The State Museum of Pennsylvania staff.
No known individuals were identified. The objects include seed and
glass beads; brass bell; buttons; a projectile point; brick fragments;
charcoal fragments; gun parts; coffin nails; mirror fragments;
miscellaneous objects made from iron, brass, and leather; seeds and
nuts; medallions; jinglers; chain fragments; a bracelet; rings;
spirals; silver brooch; shell pendant; kaolin and calumet pipes; stone
tools; brass thimble; unidentified organic material; unidentified
pottery sherds; a brass box; a whetstone; and wood coffin fragments.
    The Euroamerican assemblage of objects found with the human remains
dates the burials to the 18th century. Ethnohistorical evidence and
documentary evidence identify the Wapwallopen Site as a Lenape
(Delaware) occupation dating to A.D. 1744-1755. There is no evidence to
contradict this.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of The State
Museum of Pennsylvania have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains
of 58 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of The State
Museum of Pennsylvania also have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR
10.2 (d)(2), the 18,431 objects listed above are reasonably believed to
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials
of The State Museum of Pennsylvania have determined that, pursuant to
43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity that
can be reasonably traced between these Native American human remains
and associated funerary objects and the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma and
the Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Delaware Nation,
Oklahoma; and the Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Representatives
of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally
affiliated with these human remains and associated funerary objects
should contact Stephen G. Warfel, Senior Curator, Archaeology, The
State Museum of Pennsylvania, 300 North Street, Harrisburg, PA 17120-
0024, telephone (717) 783-2887, before November 27, 2000. Repatriation
of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Delaware
Nation, Oklahoma; and the Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma may begin
after that date if no additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: October 16, 2000.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 00-27395 Filed 10-25-00; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F
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