[Federal Register: August 9, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 152)]
[Notices]
[Page 43211-43222]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr09au99-102]

[[Page 43211]]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects from the State of Minnesota in the
Possession of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, Bemidji, MN

AGENCY: National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects from the State of Minnesota in the possession of the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, Bemidji, MN.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council professional staff in consultation
with representatives of Prairie Island Community Council, Shakopee
Mdewakanton Sioux Community of Minnesota, Grand Portage Reservation
Business Committee, Fond du Lac Reservation Business Committee, Nett
Lake Reservation (Bois Forte) Tribal Council, Upper Sioux Community of
Minnesota, Lower Sioux Mdewakanton Community, Mille Lacs Band of
Chippewa Indians, White Earth Band of Minnesota Chippewa, Leech Lake
Tribal Council, Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Red Lake Nation, Iowa Tribe
of Oklahoma, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Ho-Chunk Nation of
Wisconsin, Santee Sioux Tribe of the Santee Reservation of Nebraska,
Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe of the Lake Traverse Reservation, Yankton
Sioux Tribe of South Dakota, Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's
Reservation, Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, Assinaboine and
Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation and Winnebago Tribe of
Nebraska, and the non-Federally recognized Indian groups the Mendota
Mdewakanton Dakota Community and the Kah-Bay-Kah-Nong (Warroad
Chippewa).
    In 1934, human remains representing 26 individuals were recovered
from site 21-PL-6, Warner Mounds 1 and 2, also known as the Peter Lee
Mound (21-PL-13) near Fertile, Polk County, MN during an archeological
excavation conducted by A.E. Jenks and L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The 15 associated
funerary objects include an arrowshaft ``polisher'', projectile points,
a shell bead necklace, bone bracelet fragments, shell rings, bone
beads, beaver teeth fragments, red ochre, and a soil sample.
    Site 21-PL-6/13 has been identified as Arvilla Complex, an
archeological culture which cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    In 1941, human remains representing 37 individuals were recovered
from site 21-MU-3, Lake Shetek Mounds, Murray County, MN during an
archeological excavation conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The two associated
funerary objects include a ceramic vessel and an end scraper.
    Site 21-MU-3 has been identified only as Woodland, a broad
archeological tradition that cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    In 1954, human remains representing 27 individuals were recovered
from site 21-BW-2, Sievert Mound site, Brown County, MN during an
archeological excavation conducted by L.A. Wilfor of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
object are present.
    Site 21-BW-2 has been identified only as Woodland, a broad
archeological tradition that cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    In 1978, human remains representing 58 individuals were recovered
from site 21-PO-14, Noyes site, Pope County, MN during a rescue
excavation conducted by S. Anfinson of the Minnesota Historical Society
after construction had removed a burial mound. No known individuals
were identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    Site 21-PO-14 has been identified only as Woodland, possibly
Onamia, a broad archeological tradition that cannot be identified with
any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1970, human remains representing 27 individuals were recovered
from site 21-SN-11, Syl Sand site, Stearns County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by D. Birk and C. Tiling of the
Minnesota Historical Society. No known individuals were identified. The
15 associated funerary objects include two antelope antlers with
pierced holes, two bird-bone flutes, beaver incisors, a quartz flake, a
black stone with modified grooves, a clay pipe bowl, four modified
turtle shell squares, numerous flakes, and two lithics.
    Site 21-SN-11 has been identified as a Middle to Late Woodland
site, a broad archeological tradition that cannot be identified with
any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing 13 individuals were
most likely removed from site 21-PO-3, the Pelican Lake Gravel Pit
site, Pope County, MN by unknown person(s) and donated to the
University of Minnesota Geology Laboratory. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site 21-PO-3 is associated with the Archaic Tradition, a broad
archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    In 1963, human remains representing a minimum of 36 individuals
were recovered from site 21-DK-41, River Hills Housing Development
site, Dakota County, MN by V. Helmen of the Science Museum of Minnesota
when they were encountered during construction. No known individuals
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site 21-DK-41 has been identified as possibly an Archaic site, a
broad archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1964, human remains representing 33 individuals were recovered
from site 21-HE-98, the Macmillan site, Hennepin County, MN during an
archeological excavation conducted by K. Day of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    Site 21-HE-98 is associated with the Woodland Tradition, a broad
archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    In 1934, human remains representing 19 individuals were recovered
from a destroyed mound in Freeborn County, MN by person(s) unknown.
These human remains were turned over to the County sheriff who donated
them to the University of Minnesota. No known individuals were
identified. The three associated funerary objects include a copper
ring-pendant, pieces of turtle shell, and a chert knife.
    Based on the associated funerary objects, the human remains from
Freeborn County are associated with the Woodland Tradition, a broad
archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    In 1936, human remains representing 26 individuals were recovered
from site 21-RL-1, Red Lake River Mounds, Red Lake County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The 41 associated
funerary objects include clam shells, worked and unmodified flakes,
projectile points, worked bone, broken bifaces, scrapers, a hafted
antler-beaver tooth tool, shell beads, black quartz, a

[[Page 43212]]

spiral shell pendant, a small core, worked shell, a moose metapodial
tool, elk antler tool, three blades, a hammerstone, a slate tool, a
knife, and a maul.
    Site 21-RL-1 has been identified as Arvilla Complex, an
archeological culture which cannot be associated with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    In 1932, human remains representing ten individuals were recovered
from site 21-CW-1, Pine River Mounds site, Crow Wing County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects were present.
    Site 21-CW-1 has been identified as part of the Woodland Tradition,
a broad archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1961, human remains representing 11 individuals were recovered
from site 21-WN-15, Vaigt or Voight site, Winona County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by T. Fiske and D. Hume of the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The nine
associated funerary objects include cclamshells, animal bone and
antler, a beaver tooth, and a point fragment.
    Site 21-WN-15 has been identified as part of the Archaic Tradition,
a broad archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual
identified as being from Kandiyohi County, MN were donated to the
Minnesota Historical Society from an unknown person. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These remains from Kandiyohi County have no archeological
associations and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe
or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual
identified as having come from site 21DL9, Douglas County, MN were
donated to the Minnesota Historical Society by an unknown person. No
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These remains from Douglas County have no archeological
associations and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe
or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual
identified as having come from site 21-AN-16, Anoka County, MN were
donated to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council's laboratory at Hamline
University by an unknown person. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Site 21-AN-16 has been identified as part of the Woodland
Tradition, a broad archeological tradition which cannot be identified
with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing four individuals
were recovered form 21-OT-78, Clitheral site, Otter Tail County, MN by
unknown person(s) and donated to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council's
laboratory at Hamline University. No known individuals were identified.
No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site 21-OT-78 has been identified as part of the Archaic Tradition,
a broad archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing four individuals
from site 21-DL-72, Burkey Farm, Douglas County, MN were removed
following their disturbance during construction. No known individuals
were identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    Site 21-DL-72 has no archeological identification and cannot be
associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1977, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from 21-CA-22, Pine River Resort, Cass County, MN during archeological
excavations conducted by D. Birk, who donated these remains to the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known individual was identified.
The associated funerary objects were not included in the donation.
    Site 21-CA-22 has been identified as Woodland, a broad
archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    In 1985, human remains representing three individuals were
recovered from Long Lake (Union) Cemetery, Hennepin County, MN. These
human remains were recovered by representatives of the Minnesota Indian
Affairs Council from two spoil piles where recent graves had been dug.
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects
were present.
    These Hennepin County human remains have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1985, human remains representing three individuals were
recovered from site 21-BK-37, the Hildebrand site, Becker County, MN by
representatives of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council following their
disturbance during construction. No known individuals were identified.
No associated funerary objects were present.
    Site 21-BK-37 has no archeological classification and cannot be
associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from Traverse County, MN by W. Jensen and donated to the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council by J. Presley. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Traverse County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    During the 1940s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from a WPA road construction site near Sauk Centre, Stearns
County, MN and donated to the University of Minnesota. No known
individual was identified. No funerary objects are present.
    These human remains have no archeological classification and cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1987, human remains representing three individuals were
recovered from the Longville area of Cass County, MN during housing
construction by unknown person(s) and turned over to the Minnesota
State Archeologist acting on behalf of the Minnesota Indian Affairs
Council. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains have no archeological classification and cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1989, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from Crow Wing County, MN and turned over to the Minnesota Indian
Affairs Council by the Crow Wing County sheriff. No known individual
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Crow Wing County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1991, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from Minnetonka Regional Park, Hennepin County, MN during an
archeological survey conducted by R. Thompson. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    These human remains from Hennepin County have no archeological

[[Page 43213]]

classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1991, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from private land in Kanabec County, MN during housing construction and
were turned over to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council by the Kanabec
County sheriff. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    These human remains have no archeological classification and cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1992, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from site 21-KC-25, Hannaford, Koochiching County, MN during an
archeological excavation conducted by C. Caine, State Archeologist. No
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were
present.
    These human remains from site 21-KC-25 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1992, human remains representing one individual were donated to
the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council by S. Simon of Winona, MN. The
skull had been in the possession of his grandfather, a physician, who
received it from someone who reported that it came from a mound,
possibly in Freeborn County, MN. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    The human remains from Freeborn County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1993, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-PO-13, Pope County, MN by person(s) unknown. These human
remains were turned over to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council by the
Science Museum of Minnesota. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-PO-13 may be associated with the
Archaic Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot be
associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1992, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from the east shore of Otter Tail Lake, Otter Tail County, MN by R.
Clouse of the Minnesota Historical Society acting on behalf of the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known individual was identified.
No associated funerary objects are present.
    The human remains from Otter Tail County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1989-1990, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site 21-WR-176, Wright County, MN by R. Andrews and sent
to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council through M. Galvin. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The human remains from site 21-WR-176 have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1993, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 21-BE-135, Malvin site, Blue Earth County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by R. Strachan and K. Roetzel of
Mankato State University and transferred to the Minnesota Indian
Affairs Council. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects were present.
    These human remains from site 21-BE-135 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1993, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-NL-47, Minnemishinona Falls, Nicollet County, MN by C.L.
Smith and turned over to the Nicollet County Sheriff's department. No
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Site 21-NL-47 has been identified as Woodland Tradition, an
archeological classification which cannot be associated with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1989, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from near Pickeral Lake, Freeborn County, MN and turned over to the
Science Museum of Minnesota by E.R. Feikema. In 1994, the Science
Museum of Minnesota transferred these remains to the Minnesota Indian
Affairs Council. No known individual was identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Freeborn County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
recovered from a cave on Grey Cloud Island, Washington County, MN and
transferred to the Ramsey County Medical Examiner's Office. In 1994,
these human remains were transferred to the Minnesota Indian Affairs
Council. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from Washington County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1994, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from site 21-MU-10, Lake Shetek State Park, Murray County, MN during an
archeological survey conducted by D. Radford, Minnesota Department of
Natural Resources. No known individual was identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-MU-10 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing one
individual were removed from site 21-RA-7, Big Mound, White Bear Lake,
Ramsey County, MN by unknown individuals and turned over to the
Minnesota Historical Society. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on skeletal morphology, these human remains (H319.2- Female,
18-20 years old) have been identified as Native American. These human
remains from site 21-RA-7 are associated with the Woodland Tradition, a
broad archeological classification which cannot be associated with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing one
individual were removed from an unknown site in Wabasha County, MN by
J.V. Brower. In the 1970s, these human remains were catalogued into the
collections of the Minnesota Historical Society. No known individual
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Wabasha County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing one
individual were removed from site 21-MA-3, Marshall County, MN during
excavations conducted by A.J. Hill. In 1905, these human remains were
donated to the Minnesota Historical Society as part of the Mitchell
collection. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.

[[Page 43214]]

    These human remains from site 21-MA-3 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing four
individuals were removed from site 21-WN-14, Winona County, MN during
excavations conducted by T.H. Lewis. In 1905, these human remains were
donated to the Minnesota Historical Society as part of the Mitchell
collection. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-WN-14 may be associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing four
individuals from an unknown site in Clearwater County, MN were removed
by J.V. Brower and donated to the Minnesota Historical Society. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Clearwater County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing five
individuals were removed from site 21-RA-5, Mounds Park, Ramsey County,
MN during excavations by T.H. Lewis and cataloged into the collections
of the Minnesota Historical Society. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-RA-5 are associated with the
Middle Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing one
individual were removed from site 21-BL-30, Beltrami County, MN during
excavations by T.H. Lewis and cataloged into the collections of the
Minnesota Historical Society. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-BL-30 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing one
individual were removed from an unidentified location in Traverse
County, MN by T.H. Lewis and later cataloged into the collections of
the Minnesota Historical Society. No known individual was identified.
No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Traverse County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1938, human remains representing 22 individuals were removed
from an undesignated site in Anoka County, MN by R. Golden who donated
them to the University of Minnesota. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Anoka County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1952, human remains representing 48 individuals were removed
from site 21-BW-1, Synsteby Mound and Village site, Brown County, MN
during archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The two
associated funerary objects include a clam shell and a broken chert
knife.
    These human remains from site 21-BW-1 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1950, human remains representing 16 individuals were removed
from site 21-AN-1, the Howard Lake site, Anoka County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects were present.
    These human remains from site 21-AN-1 are associated with the
Middle Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1946, human remains representing 42 individuals were removed
from site 21-BS-3, Lindholm Mounds site, Big Stone County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The four associated
funerary objects include one shell bead, a bone pin, a ceramic vessel,
and worked bone.
    These human remains from site 21-BS-3 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1952, human remains representing 16 individuals were removed
from site 21-KH-2, Nest Lake Mound site, Kandiyohi County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects were present.
    These human remains from site 21-KH-2 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    During the 1970s, human remains representing eight individuals were
removed from a location in the vicinity of Cambria, Blue Earth County,
MN by an unknown donor who gave them to the Minnesota Historical
Society. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from Blue Earth County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    During the early 1970s, human remains representing 69 individuals
were removed from site 21-WW-4, Alton Anderson site, Watonwan County,
MN during archeological excavations conducted by A.G. Lothson of the
Minnesota Historical Society. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from 21-WW-4 are probably associated with the
Besant and Avonlea Phases, archeological classifications for certain
Plains-oriented groups which cannot be associated with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing one
individual were removed form 21-RA-7, the Big Mound site at White Bear
Lake, Ramsey County, MN by person(s) unknown. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains (H319.19) from 21-RA-7 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    During the 1970s, human remains representing two individuals were
removed from an unknown location in Hennepin County, MN by an unknown
person who donated these remains to the Minnesota Historical Society.
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects
are present.
    These human remains from Hennepin County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated

[[Page 43215]]

with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1974, human remains representing one individual were removed
from an unknown location in Koochiching County, MN by J. Oothoudt of
the Minnesota Historical Society. No known individual was identified.
No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Koochiching County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    During the late 19th century, human remains representing four
individuals were removed from an unknown location in Mille Lacs County,
MN by J.V. Brower and donated to the Minnesota Historical Society. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Mille Lacs County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed form a site at Sandy Lake, Aitkin County, MN by unknown persons
and donated to the Science Museum of Minnesota. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains (SMMA 6662) from Aitkin County have no
archeological classification and cannot be associated with any present-
day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing three individuals
were removed from an unknown location in Minneapolis, Hennepin County,
MN by unknown persons and donated to the University of Minnesota. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Hennepin County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1970, human remains representing one individual were removed
from 21-YM-19, Yellow Medicine County, MN during a survey conducted by
D. Nystuen of the Minnesota Historical Society. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-YM-19 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing two individuals were
removed from an unknown location in Hennepin County, MN and donated by
unknown persons to the Minnesota Historical Society. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Hennepin County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1933, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from site 21-TR-5, Brown's Valley Man site, Traverse County, MN by W.
Jensen and later donated to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council by E.
Weeks, and J.J. Presley. No known individuals were identified. The
associated funerary objects were not donated.
    These human remains from site 21-TR-5 are associated with the
Paleoindian Tradition, a broad archeological classification which
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing two individuals were
removed from site 21-BK-5, Becker County, MN and donated to the
Minnesota Historical Society by a survey crew. No known individuals
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-BK-5 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual (SMMA
6665) were removed from an unknown location near Sandy Lake, Aitkin
County, MN by unknown persons and donated to the Science Museum of
Minnesota. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from Aitkin County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from an unknown location, possibly a mound near Rice Lake,
Mille Lacs County, MN by unknown persons and donated to the Minnesota
Historical Society where they were registered in 1976. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Mille Lacs County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1976, human remains representing four individuals were removed
from site 21-MA-10, Marshall County, MN during archeological
excavations conducted by the University of North Dakota and donated to
the Minnesota Historical Society by K. Lund. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-MA-10 are assoicated with the Late
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from site 21-RA-5, Mound Park, Ramsey County, MN by unknown
person(s) and became part of the Mitchell collection which was donated
to the Minnesota Historical Society. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-RA-5 are associated with the
Middle Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1971, human remains representing five individuals were removed
from site 21-OT-31, Otter Tail County, MN during an archeological
survey conducted by D. Nystuen of the Minnesota Historical Society. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from site 21-OT-31 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1931, human remains representing seven individuals were removed
form an undesignated site at Gray's Bay, Lake Minnetonka, Hennepin
County, MN by H. Fuhs and donated to the Minnesota Historical Society.
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects
are present.
    These human remains from Hennepin County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1970, human remains representing 12 individuals were removed
from a gravel pit at Lake Minnetonka, Hennepin County, MN and donated
to the Minnesota Historical Society by L. Studlareck. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Hennepin County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated

[[Page 43216]]

with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing two individuals were
removed from an unknown site in Koochiching County, MN by unknown
persons and donated to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Koochiching County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from an unknown location in Beltrami County, MN by unknown
persons and donated to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Beltrami County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from an unknown location in Blue Earth County, MN by unknown
persons and donated to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Blue Earth County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from an unknown location near Sandy Lake in Aitkin County, MN
by unknown persons and donated to the Science Museum of Minnesota. No
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains (SMMA 6666) from Aitkin County have no
archeological classification and cannot be associated with any present-
day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing two individuals were
removed from site 21-BK-14, Becker County, MN by unknown persons and
donated to the University of Minnesota. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-BK-14 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing two individuals were
removed from site 21-ME-3, Clear Lake, Meeker County, MN by unknown
persons and donated to the University of Minnesota. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from site 21-ME-3 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from an unknown location near Litchfield, Meeker County, MN by
unknown persons and donated to the University of Minnesota. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Meeker County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1933, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-OT-3, Minnesota Woman site (formerly Minnesota Man site),
Otter Tail County, MN during archeological excavations conducted by
A.E. Jenks of the University of Minnesota. No known individual was
identified. The three associated funerary objects include one pendant,
one ``dagger'' and soil samples.
    These human remains and associated funerary objects are associated
with the Archaic Tradition, a broad archeological classification which
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1933, human remains representing three individuals were removed
from site 21-ML-1 the Brower/Anderson/Vanderbloom/Kern site, Mille Lacs
County, MN during archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of
the University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The
one associated funerary object are samples of ochorous clay.
    These human remains and associated funerary object from site 21-ML-
1 are associated with the Malmo Culture of the Woodland Tradition, a
broad archeological classification which cannot be associated with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1930, human remains representing four individuals were removed
from an undesignated site in Otter Tail County on the property of O.M.
Carr, who donated these remains to the University of Minnesota. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Otter Tail County are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1931, human remains representing nine individuals were removed
from an undesignated site along the north bank of the Minnesota River
in Hennepin County, MN by D.H. Nordenson and donated to the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Hennepin County are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1934, human remains representing 33 individuals were removed
from site 21-TR-1, Round Mound site, Traverse County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-TR-1 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1934, human remains representing five individuals were removed
from site 21-TR-2, Wilson Mound site, Traverse County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The 17 associated
funerary objects include shell pendants, a scraper, columnella beads,
four bone bracelets, seven bone beads, and a shell.
    These human remains from site 21-TR-2 are associated with the
Arvilla Complex, an archeological classification which cannot be
associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1934, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-TR-3, K Group Mound site, Traverse County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of the University of
Minnesota. No known individual was identified. The one associated
funerary object is a projectile point.
    These human remains and associated funerary object from site 21-TR-
3 are associated with the Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1935, human remains representing four individuals were removed
from site

[[Page 43217]]

21-BS-2, Schoen Mound site, Mound <greek-i>1, Big Stone County, MN
during archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-BS-2 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1935, human remains representing nine individuals were removed
from site 21-BS-1, Schoen Mound site, Mound <greek-i>2, Big Stone
County, MN during archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of
the University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The
one associated funerary object is a bison bone.
    These human remains and associated funerary object from site 21-BS-
1 are associated with the Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1946, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-BS-4, Lou Miller Mounds site, Big Stone County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individual was identified. The two associated
funerary objects are a scraper and a ceramic vessel.
    These human remains and associated funerary objects from site 21-
BS-4 are associated with the Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1935, human remains representing nine individuals were removed
from site 21-BS-5, Holtz Mound site, Big Stone County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-BS-5 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1936, human remains representing four individuals were removed
from an unknown location in Polk County, MN and donated to the
University of Minnesota by M. Nelson. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Polk County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1936, human remains representing three individuals were removed
from an undesignated site on Big Split Hand Lake near Grand Rapids,
Itasca County, MN by H.P. Hulin who donated these remains to the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The 44
associated funerary objects are ceramic sherds.
    These human remains and associated funerary objects from the site
on Big Split Hand Lake are associated with the Woodland Tradition, a
broad archeological classification which cannot be associated with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1936, human remains representing ten individuals were removed
from site 21-KT-1, Lake Bronson site, Kittson County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The two associated
funerary objects are a ceramic vessel and a necklace of canine teeth.
    These human remains from site 21-KT-1 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1936, human remains representing four individuals were removed
from site 21-MA-1, Snake River Mounds site, Marshall County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The 21 associated
funerary objects include bear claws, a flat rocke, bone pins, stone
tools, two pieces of flat bone, flakes, a projectile point, a clay
pipe, and a perforated antler handle.
    These human remains from site 21-MA-1 are associated with the
Arvilla Complex, an archeological classification which cannot be
associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1936, human remains representing 27 individuals were removed
from site 21-AK-1, Malmo Mounds site, Aitkin County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by G. Ekhom of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The three associated
funerary objects include red ochre, clay pieces, and fragments of logs
surrounding the burials.
    These human remains from site 21-AK-1 are associated with the
Middle Woodland Malmo Culture, an archeological classification which
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1933, human remains representing three individuals were removed
from an unknown location near Hugo, Washington County, MN by P.F.
Flaskerd who donated these remains to the University of Minnesota. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from site Washington County are associated with
the Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1936, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 21-BK-14, Shell Lake, near Ponsford, Becker County, MN by
J.W. Nunn who donated these remains to the University of Minnesota. No
known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object
is a shell pendant.
    These human remains and associated funerary object from site 21-BK-
14 have no archeological classification and cannot be associated with
any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing four individuals
were removed from site 21-OT-1, Peterson Mound Group site, Otter Tail
County, MN by unknown person(s) and donated to the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-OT-1 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1937, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 21-OT-1, Peterson Mound Group site, Otter Tail County, MN
during archeological excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-OT-1 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1938, human remains representing one individual were removed
from an unknown location near Verndale, Wadena County, MN by a road
crew and donated to the University of Minnesota by H.G. Bosland. No
known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is
a stemmed projectile point.
    These human remains and associated funerary object from Wadena
County have no archeological classification and cannot be associated
with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1938, human remains representing 13 individuals were removed
from site

[[Page 43218]]

21-BE-2, Cambria site and Mounds, Blue Earth County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The nine associated
funerary objects include flakes, pottery sherds, unfired clay pellets,
a scraper, two notched arrowheads, and red ochre.
    These human remains and associated funerary objects from site 21-
BE-2 are associated with the Woodland or Mississippian Traditions,
broad archeological classifications which cannot be associated with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1938, human remains representing four individuals were removed
from an unknown location near Perham, Otter Tail County, MN and
collected by E. Weber who donated these human remains to the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Otter Tail County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1940, human remains representing nine individuals were removed
from site 21-SL-1, Pike Bay Mound, St. Louis County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The six associated
funerary objects include a ceramic vessel and bone harpoons.
    These human remains and associated funerary objects from site 21-
SL-1 are associated with the Late Woodland Blackduck Culture, an
archeological classification which cannot be associated with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1941, human remains representing five individuals were removed
from site 21-BS-2, Schoen Mound site, Mound <greek-i>1, Big Stone
County, MN during archeological excavations conducted by G.H. Smith of
the University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The
eight associated funerary objects include dog skulls, animal bones,
pottery sherds, clamshells, a chert core and limestone fossil,
groundstone hammer, and worked bone.
    These human remains and associated funerary objects from site 21-
BS-2 are associated with the Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1941, human remains representing five individuals were removed
from 21-BE-2, Cambria, Blue Earth County, MN during archeological
excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University of Minnesota.
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects
are present.
    These human remains from site 21-BE-2 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1942, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from an unknown location along Lake Vermillion, St. Louis County, MN by
J. Peil and donated to the University of Minnesota. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from St. Louis County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    During the 1930s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from an unknown location, possibly a burial mound in Aitkin
County, MN and collected by F. Swain who donated these remains to the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Aitkin County have been tentatively
associated with the Archaic Tradition, a broad archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1944, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-TO-1, Sauk Valley Man site, Todd County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by H. Retzek and donated to the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-TO-1 have been tentatively
associated with the Archaic Tradition, a broad archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1947, human remains representing four individuals were removed
from an unnumbered site, the Prairie Lake Mound site, near Pelican
Rapids, Otter Tail County, MN by O. Kopperud and donated to the
University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Otter Tail County are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1947, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-WA-2, Michaud Mounds/Grey Cloud Island Mounds, Washington
County, MN during archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford
of the University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified.
No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-WA-2 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1947, human remains representing 13 individuals were removed
from site 21-HE-3, Halpin Mounds, Hennepin County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The three
associated funerary objects are projectile points.
    These human remains from site 21-HE-3 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1947, human remains representing five individuals were removed
from an unnumbered site at the Crow Lake gravel pit, Belgrade, Stearns
County, MN by H. Retzek who donated these remains to the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from Stearns County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1947, human remains representing three individuals were removed
from the Mankato gravel pit, Mankato, Blue Earth County, MN by F. Hicks
who donated these remains to the University of Minnesota. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Blue Earth County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1948, human remains representing one individual were removed
from an unnumbered site at the Davidson Farm, Beardsley, Big Stone
County, MN by J. Davidson and donated to the Unversity of Minnesota. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Big Stone County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated

[[Page 43219]]

with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1949, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from the property of Lamphrey Gun Club, Forest Lake, Washington County,
MN by J.A. Houle who donated these remains to the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from Washington County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1949, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 21-ME-3 on Clear Lake, Meeker County, MN by H.E. Wilmot who
donated these human remains to the University of Minnesota. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Meeker County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1903, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 21-WL-1, Femco Mound site, Wilkin County, MN and donated in
1949 by SE. Mathews to the University of Minnesota. No known
individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a
partial ceramic vessel.
    In 1940, human remains representing 38 individuals were removed
from 21-WL-1, Femco Mound site, Wilkin County, MN during archeological
excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University of Minnesota.
No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary
object includes a shell bead.
    These human remains and associated funerary object from site 21-WL-
1 are associated with the Arvilla Complex, an archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1949, human remains representing three individuals were removed
from site 21-OT-5, Graham Lake site, Otter Tail County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The eight
associated funerary objects include flakes, scrapers, stone knives,
projetile points, and a ceramic vessel.
    The human remains and associated funerary objects from site 21-OT-5
are associated with the Middle Woodland Malmo Culture, an archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1951, human remains representing seven individuals were removed
from site 21-BE-6, Lewis Mounds, Blue Earth County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The five associated
funerary objects include pottery sherds, a biface base, a knife/blade,
and a ceramic vessel.
    The human remains and associated funerary objects from 21-BE-6 are
associated with the Mississippian Tradition, an archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1952, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 21-ML-1, Brower/Anderson/Vanderbloom/Kern site, Mille Lacs
County, MN during archeologicial excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford
of the University of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified.
The six associated funerary objects include potsherds, flakes, and
burned red clay.
    The human remains and associated funerary objects from site 21-ML-1
are associated with the Middle Woodland, an archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1953, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-WN-2, Volkart Mound site, Winona County, MN during an
archeological excavation conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University of
Minnesota. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-WN-2 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, an archeological classification which cannot be
associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1954, human remains representing six individuals were removed
from site 21-PO-3, Pelican Lake Gravel Pit site, Pope County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The nine associated
funerary objects include a side-notched point, copper objects, shell
beads, shell ornament, tubular pipe, a knife, an antler with beaver
tooth, and red ochre.
    The human remains and associated funerary objects from site 21-PO-3
are associated with the Archaic Tradition, a broad archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1955, human remains representing three individuals were removed
from site 21-WB-1, Brostrom site, Wabasha County, Mn during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-WB-1 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, an archeological classification which cannot be
associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1956, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-CW-207, Tip-Top Resort site, Crow Wing County, MN by A.
Schwantes who donated these remains to the University of Minnesota. No
known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is
a partial ceramic vessel.
    These human remains from site 21-CW-207 are associated with the
Late Woodland Tradition, an archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1957, human remains representing three individuals were removed
from site 21-CW-3, McAloon Mound site, Crow Wing County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The one associated
funerary object are ceramic sherds.
    These human remains and associated funerary object from site 21-CW-
3 are associated with the Woodland Tradition, an archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1957, human remains representing six individuals were removed
form site 21-SH-2, Moorhouse Mound site, Sherburne County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The eight
associated funerary objects include worked bone, a sherd, a
hammerstone, bone, an end scraper, a pottery pipe, a rasp or stamp, and
a knife.
    These human remains and associated funerary objects from site 21-
SH-2 are associated with the Woodland Tradition, an archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1937, human remains representing 21 individuals were removed
from the Morrison Mound site (21-OT-2), Otter Tail County, MN during
excavations conducted by A.E. Jenks of the University of Minnesota. No
known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object
is an end scraper.

[[Page 43220]]

    The Morrison Mound site is associated with the Woodland Tradition,
a broad archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1987, human remains representing three individuals from
unspecified public lands in Beltrami County, MN were donated to the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council from the Bemidji Chamber of Commerce.
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects
are present.
    These human remains from Beltrami County date from the Archaic
period, an archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1958, human remains representing one individual were removed
from an unnumbered site near Porter, Yellow Medicine County, MN by E.
Prenevast who donated these remains to the University of Minnesota. No
known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is
a projectile point.
    The human remains from Yellow Medicine County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1960, human remains representing one individual were removed
from an unknown location at Big Stone Lake, Big Stone County, MN by
unknown person(s) and donated to the University of Minnesota. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The human remains from Big Stone County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1961, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-MA-6, Haarstad Mound site, Marshall County, MN during an
archeological excavation conducted by O.E. Johnson of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The 32 associated
funerary objects include miscellaneous material, three claws, bone and
bone fragments, bird bones, limestone rock, antler, beaver incisors,
clay elbow pipe, carbon and material from pipe, snail shell beads,
tubular shell beads, quartz pebbles, red and yellow ochre, scrapers,
flakes, clamshell, bone awls, soil sample, small vertebra and tooth.
    These human remains and associated funerary objects from site 21-
MA-6 are associated with the Arvilla Complex, an archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from a highway construction site and deposited at Central Jr.
High School, Alexandria, Douglas County, MN. During the 1990s, these
human remains were turned over to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council.
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Douglas County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1963, human remains representing 32 individuals were removed
from site 21-DL-1, Hoffman Mound site, Douglas County, MN duirng an
archeological excavation conducted by O.E. Johnson of the University of
Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The five associated
funerary objects include a projectile point, shell, flakes, a sherd,
and birch bark grave lining.
    These human remains and associated funerary objects from site 21-
DL-1 are associated with the Woodland Tradition, an archeological
classification which cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1966, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-AK-9, Battle Island site, Aitkin County, MN by Mr. and
Mrs. E.T. Grolla who donated these remains to the University of
Minnesota. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from site 21-AK-9 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, an archeological classification which cannot be
associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1966, human remains representing four individuals were removed
from site 21-BE-2, Cambria site, Blue Earth County, MN by W. Jones who
donated these remains to the University of Minnesota. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from site 21-BE-2 are associated with the
Mississippian Tradition, an archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1967, human remains representing four individuals were removed
from site 21-BS-16 in Big Stone State Park, Big Stone County, MN by K.
Sanders who donated these remains to the University of Minnesota. No
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    The human remains from site 21-BS-16 have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1971, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-SL-12, Cemetery Island, St. Louis County, MN by H.W.
McClusky who donated these remains to the University of Minnesota. No
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    The human remains from site 21-SL-12 are tentatively associated
with the Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which
cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1992, human remains representing two individuals were recovered
from a gravel pit in Otter Tail County, MN by G. Goltz and J. Harrison
acting on behalf of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    These human remains from Otter Tail County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    In 1992, human remains representing four individuals were recovered
from a bank of the Minnesota River across from Murphy's Landing,
Hennepin County, MN by T. Hein, B. O'Connell, and S. Myster on behalf
of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    These human remains from Hennepin County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing 12 individuals were
recovered from site 21-CA-3, Pillager Mounds, Cass County, MN by an
unidentified person. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Site 21-CA-3 has been identified only as Woodland, a broad
archeological tradition that cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    In 1963, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 21-DL-2, Lake Carlos Beach, Douglas County, MN during
excavations conducted by Elden Johnson of the University of Minnesota.
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    Site 21-DL-2 has been identified as Woodland Tradition, a broad
archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.

[[Page 43221]]

    In 1946, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 21-NR-2, the Habben Mound site, Norman County, MN during
excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University of Minnesota.
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects
are present.
    Site 21-NR-2 has been identified as Arvilla Complex, a broad
archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    In 1946, human remains representing 15 individuals were removed
from site 21-NR-1, the Slininger Mound site, Norman County, MN during
excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University of Minnesota.
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects
are present.
    Site 21-NR-1 has been identified as Arvilla Complex, a broad
archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any present-day
Indian tribe or group.
    During the 1950s, human remains representing one individual were
removed from private property in Eden Prairie, Carver County, MN during
capping of a well. In 1992, Mrs. Fowler, the property owner,
transferred these human remains to the Minnesota Indian Affairs
Council. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    These human remains from Carver County have no archeological
classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian
tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from 21-SL-9, Esquagama, St. Louis County, MN by W.D. Wright
and donated to the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council (H135). No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site 21-SL-9 has been identified as a Woodland Tradition site, a
broad archeological tradition which cannot be identified with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    In 1935, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 21-BS-16, Big Stone State Park, Big Stone County, MN by M.
Matthews and M. Finberg and donated to the University of Minnesota. No
known individuals were identified. The minimum of five associated
funerary objects include bear skulls, a pottery sherd, and carnivore
skulls.
    These human remains from site 21-BS-16 are associated with the
Woodland Tradition, a broad archeological classification which cannot
be associated with any present-day Indian tribe or group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
donated by an unknown person to the Traverse County Historical Society,
MN for a display. No known individual was identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    These human remains have no further documentation, but are most
likely to have come from a site in Traverse County, MN.
    In 1948, human remains representing seven individuals were removed
from site 21-SH-01, Christensen Mound, Sherburne County, MN during
archeological excavations conducted by L.A. Wilford of the University
of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. The eight
associated funerary objects includ a lithic tool, flakes, a projectile
point, a pottery pipe, bear skulls, and a projectile point tip.
    In 1995, these human remains were reburied under Minnesota statute
307.08. The associated funerary objects were transferred to the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council in 1997-1998 for reburial with their
human remains. These human remains and associated funerary objects from
site 21-SH-01 are associated with the Woodland Tradition, an
archeological classification which cannot be associated with any
present-day Indian tribe or group.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have determined that, pursuant to 43
CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical
remains of a minimum of 1,059 individuals of Native American ancestry.
Officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have also determined
that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the approximately 306 objects
listed above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the
death rite or ceremony. Lastly, and in accordance with the
recommendations of the NAGPRA Review Committee, officials of the
Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have determined that, pursuant to 43
CFR 10.2 (e), there is no relationship of shared group identity which
can be reasonably traced between these Native American human remains
and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe or
group; and the disposition of these Native American human remains and
associated funerary objects will follow Minnesota Statute 307.08.
    This notice has been sent to officials of Prairie Island Community
Council, Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community of Minnesota, Grand
Portage Reservation Business Committee, Fond du Lac Reservation
Business Committee, Nett Lake Reservation (Bois Forte) Tribal Council,
Upper Sioux Community of Minnesota, Lower Sioux Mdewakanton Community,
Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians, White Earth Band of Minnesota
Chippewa, Leech Lake Tribal Council, Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Red Lake
Nation, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Ho-
Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Santee Sioux Tribe of the Santee Reservation
of Nebraska, Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe of the Lake Traverse
Reservation, Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota, Chippewa-Cree Indians
of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa
Indians, Assinaboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation and
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, and the non-Federally recognized Indian
groups the Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Community and the Kah-Bay-Kah-
Nong (Warroad Chippewa). Representatives of any other Indian tribe that
believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains
and associated funerary objects should contact James L. (Jim) Jones,
Cultural Resource Specialist, Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, 1819
Bemidji Ave. Bemidji, MN 56601; telephone: (218) 755-3825, before
September 8, 1999. Repatriation of the human remains and associated
funerary objects to the Prairie Island Community Council, Shakopee
Mdewakanton Sioux Community of Minnesota, Grand Portage Reservation
Business Committee, Fond du Lac Reservation Business Committee, Nett
Lake Reservation (Bois Forte) Tribal Council, Upper Sioux Community of
Minnesota, Lower Sioux Mdewakanton Community, Mille Lacs Band of
Chippewa Indians, White Earth Band of Minnesota Chippewa, Leech Lake
Tribal Council, Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Red Lake Nation, Iowa Tribe
of Oklahoma, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Ho-Chunk Nation of
Wisconsin, Santee Sioux Tribe of the Santee Reservation of Nebraska,
Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe of the Lake Traverse Reservation, Yankton
Sioux Tribe of South Dakota, Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's
Reservation, Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, Assinaboine and
Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation and Winnebago Tribe of
Nebraska, and the non-Federally recognized Indian groups the Mendota
Mdewakanton Dakota Community and the Kah-Bay-Kah-Nong (Warroad

[[Page 43222]]

Chippewa) may begin after that date if no additional claimants come
forward.
Dated: August 2, 1999.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 99-20369 Filed 8-6-99; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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