[Federal Register: May 28, 1998 (Volume 63, Number 102)]
[Notices]
[Page 29249-29250]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr28my98-119]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects from Rio Arriba County and Taos County,
NM in the Control of the Carson National Forest, United States Forest
Service, Taos, NM

AGENCY: National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of
the Carson National Forest, United States Forest Service, Taos, NM.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Museum of
New Mexico, Maxwell Museum (University of New Mexico), and U.S. Forest
Service professional staff in consultation with representatives of the
Navajo Nation, the Pueblo of Taos, and the Pueblo of Picuris.
    In 1934, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from site LA 1684 during legally authorized excavations conducted by
C.O. Erwin and M.W. Kelly of the Laboratory of Anthropology (Museum of
New Mexico). No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization,
site LA 1684 has been identified as a Navajo pueblito occupied during
the first half of the 18th century.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the United
States Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains
of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the United
States Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001
(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and the
Navajo Nation.
    In 1965, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from site LA 9203 during legally authorized excavations conducted by
the University of New Mexico Archaeological Field School. No known
individual was identified. No funerary objects are present.
    Based on material culture and site organization, site LA 9203 has
been identified as an Anasazi pithouse occupied between 1100-1225 A.D.
    In 1967, human remains representing three individuals were
recovered from sites LA 9204, LA 9205, and LA 9206 during legally
authorized excavations conducted by the University of New Mexico
Archaeological Field School. No known individuals were identified. The
one associated funerary object is a piece of animal bone with the
individual at site LA 9204.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization,
sites LA 9204, LA 9205, and LA 9206 have been identified as three
Anasazi roomblocks occupied between 1100-1225 A.D.
    In 1968, human remains representing nine individuals were recovered
from site LA 66407 near Los Rancho de Taos during legally authorized
excavations conducted by U.S. Forest Service personnel. No known
individuals were identified. The five associated funerary objects
include pottery sherds.
    Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization,
site LA 66407 has been identified as an Anasazi pithouse occupied
between 1150-1350 AD.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the United
States Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains
of 13 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the United
States Forest Service have also determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR
10.2 (d)(2), the six objects listed above are reasonably believed to
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials
of the United States Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to
43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity which
can be reasonably traced between these Native American human remains
and associated funerary objects and the Pueblo of Taos and the Pueblo
of Picuris.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Navajo Nation, the
Pueblo of Taos, and the Pueblo of Picuris. Representatives of any other
Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with
these human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr.
Frank E. Wozniak, NAGPRA

[[Page 29250]]

Coordinator, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service, 517 Gold Ave.,
SW, Albuquerque, NM 87102; telephone: (505) 842-3238, fax (505) 842-
3800, before June 29, 1998. Repatriation of the human remains and
associated funerary objects to the culturally affiliated tribes may
begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: May 20, 1998.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 98-14047 Filed 5-27-98; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

Back to the top

Back to National-NAGPRA