[Federal Register: January 28, 1998 (Volume 63, Number 18)]
[Notices]
[Page 4285-4286]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr28ja98-115]

[[Page 4285]]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects from Maine in the Possession of the
Department of Anthropology, University of Maine, Orono, ME

AGENCY: National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C.
3003 (d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains and
associated funerary objects from Maine in the possession of the
Department of Anthropology, University of Maine, Orono, ME.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University
of Maine professional staff and a consulting forensic anthropologist in
consultation with representatives of the Aroostook Band of MicMacs,
Houlton Band of Maliseets, Passamaquoddy Tribe, and the Penobscot
Indian Nation.
    Prior to 1966, human remains representing one individual were
uncovered at Benton Falls, ME during a mill foundation excavation.
These human remains were donated to the Department of Anthropology,
University of Maine by an unknown person. No known individual was
identified. The three associated funerary objects are tubular copper
beads.
    Based on the associated funerary objects, this individual has been
determined to be Native American. The copper beads also appear to be
from the historic period (post-1600 AD). Because these human remains
are likely from the post-contact period (post-1600 A.D.) and historical
documents place the Wabanaki in Maine during this time, these human
remains are affiliated with the Micmac, Malecite, Passamaquoddy,
Penobscot present-day tribes.
    In 1968, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from the Hathaway site (91-1), Passadumkeag, ME during an
archaeological excavation conducted by Dr. Dean Snow and sponsored by
the University of Maine and the National Science Foundation. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects were present.
    Archaeological evidence based on the material culture of Maine
indicates that the Ceramic Period (c. 1,000 B.C. to the contact period)
``is the prehistory of those Algonkian speakers known generally as the
Wabenakis; including the Micmac, Malecite, Passamaquoddy, [and]
Penobscot.'' A radiocarbon date of 200+/-80 A.D. from charcoal near the
human remains dates these remains to well within the Ceramic Period
considered ancestral to the present-day tribes of Maine.
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual were
donated to the University of Maine by the Portland Society of Natural
History. In 1930, these human remains were recovered during streetcar
track construction in Waterville, ME. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on dental morphology, this individual has been determined to
be Native American. Published reports of the excavation indicated there
was red-stained sand in association with these human remains (the sand
was not recovered). Based on the state of preservation and the lack of
red staining on these human remains, the date of burial has been
estimated to be from the Ceramic into the Historic period (c. 1,000
B.C. to post-1600 A.D.). Archaeological evidence based on the material
culture of Maine indicates that the Ceramic Period (c. 1,000 B.C. to
the contact period) ``is the prehistory of those Algonkian speakers
known generally as the Wabenakis; including the Micmac, Malecite,
Passamaquoddy, [and] Penobscot.''
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual were
donated to the University of Maine by the Portland National History
Society. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    Information accompanying these human remains indicate they were
recovered from Rogers (possibly Roques or Rogues) Island. No further
information is available. Based on the state of preservation of the
remains and coastal location of the site, a shell midden context for
these human remains is likely. Interment in shell middens is commonly
associated with the Ceramic period. Archaeological evidence based on
the material culture of Maine indicates that the Ceramic Period (c.
1,000 B.C. to the contact period) ``is the prehistory of those
Algonkian speakers known generally as the Wabenakis; including the
Micmac, Malecite, Passamaquoddy, [and] Penobscot.''
    During the 1960s, human remains representing one individual were
donated to the Department of Anthropology, University of Maine by the
Portland Natural History Society. No known individual was identified.
No associated funerary objects are present.
    Information accompanying these human remains indicates that they
were acquired in 1924 by Mr. Samuel Hiscock of Round Pond, ME from a
``workman'' digging in the Damariscotta Oyster Shell Heaps, ME. This
information also suggests there may have been some Ceramic period
objects with the human remains which were not included in the donation.
Archaeological evidence based on the material culture of the
Damariscotta Shell Heaps indicates that the Ceramic Period (c. 1,000
B.C. to the contact period) ``is the prehistory of those Algonkian
speakers known generally as the Wabenakis; including the Micmac,
Malecite, Passamaquoddy, [and] Penobscot.''
    During the 1960s, human remains representing two individuals from
Cape Elizabeth and South Freeport, ME were donated to the Department of
Anthropology, University of Maine by the Portland Natural History
Society. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    Information with these human remains indicates they were removed
from Cape Elizabeth, ME and donated to the Portland Natural History
Society in 1955 by Mr. and Mrs. Rogerson of Portland, ME; and a Mr.
Randall donated additional human remains from South Freeport, ME. These
human remains were not cataloged by the Portland Natural History
Society, and have been co-mingled so that it is not possible to
separate them by locality. Based on dental morphology, these human
remains have been determined to be Native American. Based on the
recovery of these human remains from the bases of eroded banks and the
state of preservation of the remains, the date of burial has been
estimated to be from the Ceramic into the Historic period (c. 1,000
B.C. to post-1600 A.D.). Archaeological evidence based on the material
culture of Maine indicates that the Ceramic Period (c. 1,000 B.C. to
the contact period) ``is the prehistory of those Algonkian speakers
known generally as the Wabenakis; including the Micmac, Malecite,
Passamaquoddy, [and] Penobscot.''
    Prior to 1971, human remains representing one individual from
``High Point'', Hampden, ME were donated to the Department of
Anthropology, possibly by Mr. Earl Banks. No known individual was
identified. No funerary objects are present.
    Based on the molar wear patterns present, this individual has been
determined to be Native American. Although this exact site is unknown,
the state of preservation of these human remains indicate that they are
fairly recent, probably post-contact (c.1600).

[[Page 4286]]

Because these human remains are likely from the post-contact period
(post-1600 A.D.) and historical documents place the Wabanaki in Maine
during this time, these human remains are affiliated with the Micmac,
Malecite, Passamaquoddy, Penobscot present-day tribes.
    In 1973, human remains representing a minimum of one individual
were recovered from a highly disturbed sand dune (71-2) in Farmington
Falls, ME by unknown person(s) and have been curated at the Department
of Anthropology, University of Maine, since that time. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on the state of preservation, these human remains are
believed to date from the Ceramic period into the contact period.
Archaeological evidence based on the material culture of Maine
indicates that the Ceramic Period (c. 1,000 B.C. to the contact period)
``is the prehistory of those Algonkian speakers known generally as the
Wabenakis; including the Micmac, Malecite, Passamaquoddy, [and]
Penobscot.''
    In 1973, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from Winnock's Neck (site 8-1), Scarboro, ME during investigations by
amateur archeologists. These human remains and field notes pertaining
to them were subsequently donated to the University of Maine by unknown
individual(s). No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    The field notes accompanying these remains indicate they were
recovered with three pottery sherds, indicating a likely Ceramic Period
date for these human remains. Archaeological evidence based on the
material culture of Maine indicates that the Ceramic Period (c. 1,000
B.C. to the contact period) ``is the prehistory of those Algonkian
speakers known generally as the Wabenakis; including the Micmac,
Malecite, Passamaquoddy, [and] Penobscot.''
    In 1984, human remains representing a minimum of one individual
from the Todd site (17-11) Bremem, ME were recovered by a University of
Maine research team. No known individual was identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    The Todd site (17-11) has been identified as a shell midden dating
to the late Ceramic period (post 1000 A.D.). Archaeological evidence
based on the material culture of Maine indicates that the Ceramic
Period (c. 1,000 B.C. to the contact period) ``is the prehistory of
those Algonkian speakers known generally as the Wabenakis; including
the Micmac, Malecite, Passamaquoddy, [and] Penobscot.''
    In 1989, human remains representing a minimum of nine individuals
were recovered from the Eddington Bend site (74-8), Eddington, ME
during a FERC-required recovery excavation by University of Maine
personnel. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects were recoverable.
    Based on dental morphology, these individuals have been determined
to be Native American. Based on the presence of a highly oxidized and
unrecoverable piece of iron in the pit feature with the human remains
and apparent iron or steel tool cut marks on the bones, these human
remains probably date to the post-contact period. Because these human
remains are likely from the post-contact period (post-1600 A.D.) and
historical documents place the Wabanaki in Maine during this time,
these human remains are affiliated with the Micmac, Malecite,
Passamaquoddy, Penobscot present-day tribes.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the
Department of Anthropology, University of Maine have determined that,
pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above
represent the physical remains of a minimum of 21 individuals of Native
American ancestry. Officials of the Department of Anthropology,
University of Maine have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C.
3001 (3)(A), the three objects listed above are reasonably believed to
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials
of the Department of Anthropology, University of Maine have determined
that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared
group identity which can be reasonably traced between these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the
Aroostook Band of MicMacs, Houlton Band of Maliseets, Passamaquoddy
Tribe, and the Penobscot Indian Nation.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Aroostook Band of
MicMacs, Houlton Band of Maliseets, Passamaquoddy Tribe, and the
Penobscot Indian Nation. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that
believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains
and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. David Sanger,
Department of Anthropology, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469;
telephone: (207) 581-1894, before February 27, 1998. Repatriation of
the human remains and associated funerary objects to the culturally
affiliated tribes may begin after that date if no additional claimants
come forward.
Dated: January 15, 1998.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 98-1992 Filed 1-27-98; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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