[Federal Register: October 10, 1997 (Volume 62, Number 197)]
[Notices]
[Page 53023-53025]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr10oc97-123]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects From Iowa in the Possession of the
Office of the State Archaeologist, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C.
3003 (d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains and
associated funerary objects from Iowa in the possession of the Office
of the State Archaeologist, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Office
of the State Archaeologist of Iowa professional staff in consultation
with representatives of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, the Iowa
Tribe of Oklahoma, and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Oklahoma.
    During the 1920s to the 1950s, human remains representing eight
individuals were removed from an unknown site south of Dorchester, IA
by Mr. Paul Cota and donated to Luther College, Decorah, IA. In 1990,
these human remains were transferred to the Office of the State
Archaeologist of Iowa. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present. Although the exact site is
unknown, the area south of Dorchester has numerous Oneota sites. The
degree of bone preservation and overall appearance, such as cranial
morphology, dental health, and expression of gender-based dimorphic
characteristics is consistent with known Oneota remains.
    In 1943, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 13AM108, Allamakee County, IA possibly by H.P. Field. At an
unknown date these remains were donated to Luther College, Decorah, IA
and in 1987 were transferred to the Office of the State Archaeologist
of Iowa Burials Program. No known individuals were identified. The
fourteen associated funerary objects include a piece of flaking debris,
ten Oneota pot sherds, a bison scapula, a beaver femur, and an
incomplete sacrum from a medium-sized mammal.
    In 1953, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from an unknown site near New Albin, IA by H.P. Field and donated in
1960 to Marshall McKusick, Professor of Anthropology at the University
of Iowa. At an unknown date, these remains were transferred from the
Department of Anthropology to the Office of the State Archaeologist of
Iowa. No known individuals were identified. No assoicated funerary
objects are present. Although the exact site is unknown, the area
around New Albin has numerous Oneota sites. The degree of bone
preservation and overall appearance, such as cranial morphology, dental
health, and expression of gender-based dimorphic characteristics is
consistent with known Oneota remains.
    In the mid-1950s, human remains representing three individuals were
removed from an unknown site in Allamakee County, IA by a game warden
with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. These remains were given
to Robert Bray, Effigy Mounds National Mounument. In the 1960s, Mr.
Bray took these remains to the University of Missouri's Lyman
Archaeological Research Center, Miami, MO. In 1993, these remains were
transferred to the Office of the State Archaeologist of Iowa. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present. Although the exact site is unknown, Allamakee County has
numerous Oneota sites. The degree of bone preservation and overall
appearance, such as cranial morphology, dental health, and expression
of gender-based dimorphic characteristics is consistent with known
Oneota remains.
    In 1957, human remains representing eight individuals were removed
from site 13WD6, Woodbury County, IA during salvage excavations
conducted by the Northwest Chapter of the Iowa Archeological Society
and placed in the Sanford Museum, Cherokee, IA. In 1979, these remains
were transferred to the Office of the State Archaeologist of Iowa. No
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    In the 1950s or 1960s, human remains representing two individuals
were removed from the surface of an eroding river bank on site 13WD8,
Woodbury County, IA by Ruth Thornton. In 1989, these remains were
transferred to the Office of the State Archaeologist of Iowa Burials
Program. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    In 1960, human remains representing a minimum of 29 individuals
were removed from site 13AM43, Allamakee County, IA during a road
construction project by Marshall McKusick, University of Iowa and
Robert Bray, Effigy Mounds National Monument. Sixteen of these
individuals were transferred at an unknown date from the Department of
Anthropology, University of Iowa to the Office of the State
Archaeologist of Iowa. Thirteen of these individuals went to Effigy
Mounds and later in the 1960s Robert Bray took them to the University
of Missouri's Lyman Archaeological Research Center, Miami, MO. In 1994,
these thirteen indivdiuals were transferred to the Office of the State
Archaeologist of Iowa. In 1987, additional fragments from this
excavation were found in the collections of Luther College and
transferred to the Office of the State Archaeologist of Iowa. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    In 1964, human remains representing thirteen individuals were
removed from site 13AM103, Allamakee County, IA by Marshall McKusick,
University of Iowa. At an unknown date, these remains were transferred
from the University of Iowa Department of Anthropology to the Office of
the State Archaeologist of Iowa. No known individuals were identified.
The five associated funerary objects include a bipoint chert knife,
three mortuary pots, and a bison scapula hoe.
    Around 1965, human remains representing one individual from an
unknown site were donated to the University of Iowa Geology Department
by an unknown individual. In 1992, the human remains were transferred
to the

[[Page 53024]]

Office of the State Archaeologist of Iowa Burials Program. A note
accompanying the remains suggest an Oneota affiliation ``?Oneota skull
from pot hunter Alamakee [sic]Co., Ia.'' No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The degree of
bone preservation and overall appearance, such as cranial morphology
and metric features, are consistent with known Oneota remains.
    Around 1967, human remains representing three individuals were
removed from an eroding bank at site 13AM269, Allamakee County, IA by
Ramon and Darlene Gengler. In 1987, these human remains were
transferred to the Office of the State Archaeologist of Iowa Burials
Program. No known individuals were identified. The two associated
funerary objects include a pot sherd and a copper tube.
    In 1972, human remains representing one individual was removed from
site 13DM101, Des Moines County, IA during an archeological excavation
conducted by Dean Straffin, Parsons College, Fairfield, IA. In 1994,
these remains were transferred to the Office of the State Archaeologist
of Iowa Burials Program. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1987, human remains representing seven individuals from
northeast Iowa were transferred from Luther College to the Office of
the State Archaeologist of Iowa Burials Program. No further collection
information is available. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present. Although the exact site is
unknown, northeast Iowa has numerous Oneota sites. The degree of bone
preservation and overall appearance, such as cranial morphology, dental
health, and expression of gender-based dimorphic characteristics is
consistent with known Oneota remains.
    In 1987 and 1995, human remains representing five individuals from
site 13AM1, Allamakee County were transferred from Luther College to
the Office of the State Archaeologist of Iowa Burials Program. No
further collection information is available. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1988, human remains representing one individual from an unknown
site were transferred from Luther College to the Office of the State
Archaeologist of Iowa Burials Program. No further collection
information is available. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present. The degree of bone
preservation and overall appearance are consistent with known Oneota
remains.
    In 1988, human remains representing one individual were removed
from a cache pit at site 13WD55, Woodbury County by the Office of the
State Archaeologist of Iowa. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1993 and 1994, human remains representing six individuals were
removed from site 13WD8 during initial examination and salvage
excavation of a flood-damaged portion of the site by the Office of the
State Archaeologist personnel. No known individuals were identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1994, human remains representing one individual were removed
from site 13AM200, Allamakee County during excavation of a cache pit by
the Office of the State Archaeologist of Iowa. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1995, human remains representing one indivdiual from the surface
of site 13AM16, Allamakee County were transferred from Luther College
to the Office of the State Archaeologist of Iowa. At an unknown date,
these remains were donated to Luther College by Gavin Sampson. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1995, human remains representing two individuals were removed
from site 13LA1, Louisa County, IA from midden and cache pit features
during a University of Illinois field school and transferred to the
Office of the State Archaeologist of Iowa Burials Program. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing six individuals were
removed from site 13AM60, Allamakee County by an unknown person. In
1988, these remains were transferred from Luther College to the Office
of the State Archaeologist of Iowa Burials Program. No known
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are
present. Site 13AM60 has been identified as an Oneota village and
cemetery site based on material culture and site organization. The
degree of bone preservation and overall appearance, such as cranial
morphology, dental health, and expression of gender-based dimorphic
characteristics is consistent with known Oneota remains.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing three individuals
were removed from an unknown site in Lyon County by an unnamed person.
In 1995, these remains were transferred to the Office of the State
Archaeologist of Iowa Burials Program by Doug Pfeil who had been given
the remains by a person wishing to remain anonymous. No known
individuals were identified. The eleven likely associated funerary
objects are shell-tempered pot sherds. The degree of bone preservation
and overall appearance, such as cranial morphology, dental health, and
expression of gender-based dimorphic characteristics is consistent with
known Oneota remains.
    The above listed human remains and associated funerary objects have
been identified as having been removed from Oneota sites within the
State of Iowa based on archeological surveys of the areas and the types
of associated funerary objects present. These areas have been further
identified as Oneota sites based on ethnohistorical evidence, material
culture similarities, and historical maps. The Ioway and the Otoe-
Missouria peoples have been culturally affiliated with the Oneota based
on continuities of material culture, and historical documents. Oral
history evidence presented by representatives of the Iowa Tribe of
Kansas and Nebraska, the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and the Otoe-Missouria
Tribe of Oklahoma further indicate Oneota affiliation with these
present day tribes.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the Office
of the State Archaeologist have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR
10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical
remains of 104 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of
the Office of the State Archaeologist have also determined that,
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 32 objects listed above are
reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human
remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or
ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Office of the State Archaeologist
have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a
relationship of shared group identity which can be reasonably traced
between these Native American human remains and associated funerary
objects and the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, the Iowa Tribe of
Oklahoma, and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Oklahoma.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas
and Nebraska, the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe
of Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes
itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains and
associated funerary objects should contact Shirley Schermer, Burials
Program Director, Office of the State Archaeologist, 303 Eastlawn,

[[Page 53025]]

University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242; telephone: (319) 335-2400,
before November 10, 1997. Repatriation of the human remains and
associated funerary objects to the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska,
the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Oklahoma
may begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: October 3, 1997.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 97-26872 Filed 10-9-97; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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