[Federal Register: April 16, 1996 (Volume 61, Number 74)]
[Notices]               
[Page 16643-16644]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr16ap96-44]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains 
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Control of Apache-Sitgreaves 
National Forest, United States Forest Service, Springerville, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native 
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 
3003(d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects in the control of Apache-Sitgreaves 
National Forest, United States Forest Service, Springerville, AZ.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Field Museum 
of Natural History professional staff, the New Mexico State University 
professional staff, the Museum of Northern Arizona professional staff, 
the University of Arizona professional staff and National Forest 
Service professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Hopi Tribe, the Navajo Nation, the Pueblo of Acoma, and the Pueblo of 
Zuni.
    In 1955, human remains representing one individual were recovered 
from Foot Canyon Pueblo during legally authorized excavations. No known 
individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a 
projectile point.
    In 1969, human remains representing three individuals were 
recovered from the Aunt Lottie site (AZ P:11:8) during a legally 
authorized salvage project. No known individuals were identified. The 
5,862 associated funerary objects include ceramics (bowls, jars, 
pitchers, beads); bone (tools); stone (beads, tools, projectile point); 
and shell (unworked, bracelet, pendant).
    In 1976, human remains representing two individuals were recovered 
from the area of Loco Knoll during legally authorized excavations. The 
six associated funerary objects include ceramics (bowls).
    In 1979, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were recovered from the Correjo Crossing site (AZ Q:16:46) during a 
legally authorized salvage project. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are identified.

[[Page 16644]]

    During 1977 through 1983, human remains representing a minimum of 
six individuals were recovered from Wildcat Canyon site (AZ P:6:26) 
during legally authorized mitigation studies. No known individuals were 
identified. The ten associated funerary objects include ceramics (jar 
and bowls).
    During the 1980s, human remains consisting of 22 individuals were 
recovered from four sites (NA 17282, NA 17271, NA 18350, and NA 20657) 
during legally authorized excavations. The one associated funerary 
object is a bone needle.
    The nine sites listed above include ceramics, architecture, and 
site organization characteristic of Puebloan occupations during the 
Western Anasazi and Mogollon period (600--1300 AD). Technological 
continuity and similarities of the sites with the present-day Hopi 
Tribe, Pueblo of Acoma, and Pueblo of Zuni indicate cultural 
affiliation with these sites. The oral traditions of the Hopi, Pueblo 
of Acoma, and the Pueblo of Zuni indicate affiliation with sites in 
this area during this period.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the National 
Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), 
the human remains listed above represent the physical remains of at 
least 36 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the 
National Forest Service have also determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 5,880 objects listed above are reasonably 
believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at 
the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. 
Lastly, officials of the National Forest Service have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group 
identity which can be reasonably traced between these Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe, the 
Pueblo of Acoma, and the Pueblo of Zuni.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Hopi Tribe, the 
Pueblo of Acoma, and the Pueblo of Zuni. Representatives of any other 
Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with 
these human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. 
Frank E. Wozniak, NAGPRA coordinator, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest 
Service, 517 Gold Avenue SW, Albuquerque, NM 87102; telephone: (505) 
842-3238; fax: (505) 842-3800, before May 16, 1996. Repatriation of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects may begin after that date 
if no additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: April 11, 1996.
C. Timothy McKeown,
Acting Departmental Consulting Archeologist, Archeology & Ethnography 
Program.
[FR Doc. 96-9365 Filed 4-15-96; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F



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