Federal Register / Vol. 60 No. 181 / Tuesday, September 19, 1995
          / Notices                                      Page 48522 - 48523

          DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

          National Park Service

          Notice of Inventory Completion  for Native American Human Remains
          and  Associated  Funerary  Objects   in  the  Possession  of  the
          University   of  Nebraska  State  Museum,  Anthropology  Research
          Division, Lincoln, NE.

          AGENCY:  National Park Service

          ACTION:  Notice

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          Notice  is   hereby  given  under  the   Native  American  Graves
          Protection  and  Repatriation  Act,  25 U.S.C.  3003(d),  of  the
          completion of an inventory for  Native American human remains and
          associated funerary objects from  six sites in Nebraska currently
          in the  possession of the  University of  Nebraska State  Museum,
          Anthropology Research Division, Lincoln, NE.

          A detailed inventory and  assessment has been made by  members of
          the  professional  staff  of  the University  of  Nebraska  State
          Museum, in  consultation  with representatives  of  the  Northern
          Ponca Tribe of Nebraska and the Southern Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma.
          Meetings with these tribal representatives  have been held at the
          Nebraska  State Museum  on eight  occasions during  1993-1995, in
          addition to many phone conversations during this period.

          During  1936-1938,  the   Nebraska  State  Archeological   Survey
          conducted excavations of  these six sites under  the authority of
          the  W.P.A. Official  Project #165-81-8095,  Work Project  #3140.
          Under agreement  with the W.P.A., the  collections resulting from
          these excavations were accessioned  by the University of Nebraska
          State Museum.  

          Human remains from the  Ponca Fort Site (Nanza), Knox  County, NE
          consist  of sixty-six  individuals.   No  known individuals  were
          identified.   A total of 5,310 cultural items are associated with
          these  burials including:  wood  (bark fragments,  scraper, shaft
          smoother,  shaft straightener); copper  (beads, bracelets, bells,
          buttons, coils, neck rings, projectile points, rings, sheets, and
          cones);  glass  (beads,  button),  pipestone  (bannerstone,  pipe
          fragments), bone  (bison tools,  pendent, hair pipe  bead); stone
          (grinding   slab,   unknown  artifact);   iron   (ax,  bracelets,
          projectile  points, fragments);  lead (bracelet,  coils); leather
          fragments; shell (unmodified, gorgets).

          The  Ponca Fort Site's occupation by the Ponca Tribe is estimated
          as c.  1790-1800,  based on  associated cultural  items and  oral





          evidence  of Ponca  ethnohistoric informants  in the  1930s (Wood
          1965).  The J.O. Dorsey "Omaha Map" (1884) indicated the presence
          of  Ponca  earthlodges  on  this  site  and  Ponca  ethnohistoric
          informant J. LaFleshe  described "curvilinear entrenchments"  and
          "many  earth-lodges"  inside  the  fort (Dorsey  1884).    Prince
          Maximilian in  1832 described  a uninhabited Ponca  fort at  this
          location.   Cultural items found with the burials (such as copper
          fragments and trade beads), osteological evidence (such as copper
          staining, marked anterior dental wear, fair to good preservation,
          and morphological  changes related to horseback  riding), and the
          ethnohistoric  evidence are  consistent with Ponca  occupation of
          the site. 

          Human remains  from the Ponca  Point Site (Ma-azi),  Knox County,
          NE, consist of  the remains of one infant.   No known individuals
          were identified.  Two  associated funerary objects, consisting of
          one blue and one white glass bead, were found with this burial.  

          In  1966, Ponca  tribal historian  Peter LeClaire  identified the
          Ponca Point site as "Ma-azi" or  "the burying place on the top of
          the  ridge"   used  by   the  Ponca   in  the   historic  period.
          Osteological evidence of red staining on the arm and  rib and the
          two historic beads associated with this burial, the assessment of
          the site as protohistoric/historic Ponca, and Ponca ethnohistoric
          informants are consistent with Ponca occupation of this site. 

          Human remains from the Hogan Site, Knox County, NE consist of the
          remains  of  three  individuals.     No  known  individuals  were
          identified.   Two hundred eighty-one associated  funerary objects
          include glass  (beads), copper (button),  and unidentified  metal
          (pendant).

          Describing this site in the Report to the Chancellor (1937), Bell
          reports  that the Hogan  site "has been  used as a  burial ground
          until  very recent times by the Ponca."  Osteological evidence of
          red staining, good preservation, morphological changes related to
          horseback  riding,  and  the  associated  funerary  objects   are
          consistent with Ponca occupation of this site.  

          Human remains from the Davis Site, Knox County, NE consist of the
          remains  of   nine  individuals.    No   known  individuals  were
          identified.   Two  hundred and  thirty-eight associated  funerary
          objects include: glass (beads,  bottle); copper (bell, bracelets,
          buttons, bands, coils); iron (sheet, nails); pumice; wood (paper,
          post); tin (bowl, plate); textile (black cloth).  

          Reference is  made to the Ponca  living in this area  as early as
          Truteau  in 1795,  Mackay  in 1797,  Clark  in 1804,  and  Prince
          Maximilian in 1832.   Ponca  tribal members working  on the  site
          during  excavations in  1937 identified  these burials  as Ponca.
          Osteological  evidence of  brachycephalic skulls,  and associated
          cultural items are consistent with Ponca occupation of this site.





          Human  remains from the Minaric II Site (25KX9), Knox County, NE,
          consist  of the remains of six individuals.  No known individuals
          were   identified.    Sixty-eight   associated  funerary  objects
          include:  bone  (antler  fragments,  antler  scraper);  pipestone
          (fragments);  glass (beads);  ceramics (sherds);  copper (cones);
          sandstone abrader; and shells.

          In 1938, Chief Birdhead identified the Minaric II Site as a Ponca
          village "occupied by the  lesser chiefs and the common  people of
          the  tribe."  Chief Birdhead  also said that  his grandfather had
          lived in  one of the houses  on the bottom land.   In 1966, Ponca
          tribal historian Peter  LeClaire compiled a list  of Ponca sites,
          and identified the Minaric  II site as "Farming  Ground Village."
          Osteological evidence of copper staining, marked  anterior dental
          wear, fair to good preservation, morphological changes related to
          horseback  riding, and  Ponca  oral history  are consistent  with
          Ponca occupation of this site.  

          Human remains from the Minaric III Site, Knox County, NE, consist
          of  the remains  of  one individual.    No known  individual  was
          identified.   Twenty-eight  associated funerary  objects include:
          glass  (beads);  metal  (ring,   copper  necklace  band);  lithic
          (projectile point).  

          The  archeological  evidence of  the  Minaric  III site,  located
          between  the Minaric II site  and the Ponca  Fort Site, indicates
          Ponca occupation  during the historic period  consistent with the
          surrounding  Ponca  sites.    Osteological  evidence   of  copper
          staining, marked anterior dental wear, good preservation, and the
          associated cultural items are consistent with Ponca occupation of
          this site.  

          Based on  the above-mentioned  information from these  six sites,
          officials  of the  Nebraska  State Museum  have determined  that,
          pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared
          group identify which can be reasonably traced between these human
          remains and  associated funerary  objects and the  Northern Ponca
          Tribe of Nebraska and the Southern Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma.

          This  notice has  been sent  to officials  of the  Northern Ponca
          Tribe  of Nebraska  and  the Southern  Ponca  Tribe of  Oklahoma.
          Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to
          be culturally  affiliated with  the human remains  and associated
          funerary  objects should  contact  Dr. Thomas  Myers, Curator  of
          Anthropology,  University of  Nebraska State  Museum, Systematics
          Collections W436 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588-0544, telephone
          (402) 472-5033  before October 19,  1995.  Repatriation  of these
          human remains to  the Northern  Ponca Tribe of  Nebraska and  the
          Southern Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma may begin after  this date if no
          additional claimants come forward.

          Dated: September 13, 1995





          Francis P. McManamon
          Departmental Consulting Archeologist
          Archeology and Ethnography Program
          [FR Doc. 95-23153 Filed 9-18-95; 8:45 am]
          BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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